Kit Review – Snootlab DeuLigne LCD Arduino Shield

Hello everyone

Another month and time for another kit review :) Once again we have another kit from the team at Snootlab in France – their DeuLigne LCD Arduino shield. Apart from having a two row, sixteen character backlit LCD there is also a five-way joystick (up, down, left, right and enter) which is useful for data entry and so on.

This LCD shield is different to any others I have seen on the market as it uses the I2C bus for interface with the LCD screen – thereby not using any digital pins at all. The interfacing is taken care of by a Microchip MCP23008 8-bit port expander IC, and Snootlab have written a custom LCD library which makes using the LCD very simple. Furthermore the joystick uses the analog input method, using analogue pin zero. But for now, let’s examine construction.

Please note that the kit assembled in this article is a version 1.0, however the shield is now at version 1.1. Construction is very easy, starting with the visual and easy to follow instructions (download). The authors really have made an effort to write simple, easy to follow instructions. The kit arrives as expected, in a reusable anti-static pouch:

As always everything was included, including stacking headers for Arduino. It’s great to see them included, as some other companies that should know better sometimes don’t. (Do you hear me Sparkfun?)

The PCB is solid and fabricated very nicely – the silk screen is very descriptive, and the PCB is 1.7mm thick. The joystick is surface-mounted and already fitted. Here’s the top:

… and the bottom:

Using a Freetronics EtherTen as a reference,  you can see that the DeuLigne PCB is somewhat larger than the standard Arduino shield:

The first components to solder in are the resistors:

… followed by the transistor and MCP23008. Do not use an IC socket, as this will block the LCD from seating properly…

After fitting the capacitor, contrast trimpot, LCD header pins and stacking sockets the next step is to bolt in the LCD with the standoffs:

The plastic bolts can be trimmed easily, and then glued to the nuts to stay tight. Or you can just melt them together with the barrel of your soldering iron :) Finally you can solder in the LCD data pins and the shield is finished:

The only thing that concerned me was the limited space between LCD pins twelve~sixteen and the stacking header sockets. It may be preferable to solder the stacking sockets last to avoid possibly melting them when soldering the LCD. Otherwise everything was simple and construction took just under twenty minutes.

Now to get the shield working. Download and install the DeuLigne Arduino library, and then you can test your shield with the included examples. The LCD contrast can be adjusted with the trimpot between the joystick and the reset button. Note that this shield is fully Open Hardware compliant, and all the design files and so on are available from the ‘download’ tab of the shield product page.

Initialising the LCD requires the following code before void Setup():

Then in void Setup():

Now you can make use of the various LCD functions, including:

Reading the joystick position is easy, the function

returns an integer to pos representing the position. Right = 0, left = 3, up = 1, down = 2, enter = 4. Automatic text scrolling can be turned on and off with:

Creating custom characters isn’t that difficult. Each character consists of eight rows of five pixels. Create your character inside a byte array, such as:

There is an excellent tool to create these bytes here. Then allocate the custom character to a position number (0~7) using:

Then to display the custom character, just use:

And the resulting character filling the display:

Now for an example sketch to put it all together. Using my modified Freetronics board with a DS1307 real-time clock IC, we have a simple clock that can be set by using the shield’s joystick. For a refresher on the clock please read this tutorial. And for the sketch:

As you can see, the last delay statement is for 400 milliseconds. Due to the extra overhead required by using I2C on top of the LCD library, it slows down the refresh rate a little. Moving forward, a demonstration video:


So there you have it. Another useful, fun and interesting Arduino shield kit to build and enjoy. Although it is no secret I like Snootlab products, it is a just sentiment. The quality of the kit is first rate, and the instructions and support exists from the designers. So if you need an LCD shield, consider this one.

For support, visit the Snootlab website and customer forum in French (use Google Translate). However as noted previously the team at Snootlab converse in excellent English and have been easy to contact via email if you have any questions. Snootlab products including the Snootlab DeuLigne are available directly from their website. High-resolution images available on flickr.

So have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

[Disclaimer - the products reviewed in this article are promotional considerations made available by Snootlab]

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John Boxall

Founder, owner and managing editor of tronixstuff.com.

2 Responses to “Kit Review – Snootlab DeuLigne LCD Arduino Shield”

  1. nasukaren says:

    Great review! In the future, could you please list where we can buy things and the price? I’m assuming for example that the only place to get this display is from the vendor for 24€… If there’s a stateside vendor, I’d love to know!

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