Project – Arduino “Book Monster”

Introduction

Recently we saw a neat project by the people from Evil Mad Scientist – their “Peek-O-Book“, a neat take on a book with a shy monster inside, based on hardware from their Snap-O-Lantern kit. Not wanting to fork out for the postage to Australia we decided to make our own version, of which you can follow along.

This is a fun project that doesn’t require too much effort and has a lot of scope for customisation. There’s no right or wrong when making your own (or this one!) so just have fun with it.

Construction

First, you’ll need a book of some sort, something large enough to hide the electronics yet not too large to look “suspicious” – then cut the guts out to make enough space for the electronics. Then again it’s subjective, so get whatever works for you. Coincidentally we found some “dummy books” (not books for dummies) that were perfect for the job:

dummy book

After spraying the inside with matt black paint, the inside is better suited for the “eyes in the dark” effect required for the project:

dummy book internal

The “book” had a magnet and matching metal disk on the flap to aid with keep the cover shut, however this was removed as it will not allow for smooth opening with the servo.

The electronics are quite simple if you have some Arduino or other development board experience. Not sure about Arduino? You can use any microcontroller that can control a servo and some LEDs. We’re using a Freetronics LeoStick as it’s really small yet offers a full Arduino Leonardo-compatible experience, and a matching Protostick to run the wires and power from:

Freetronics Leostick and Protostick

By fitting all the external wiring to the Protostick you can still use the main LeoStick for other projects if required. The power is from 4 x AA cells, with the voltage reduced with a 1n4004 diode:

battery power and diode

And for the “eyes” of our monster – you can always add more if it isn’t too crowded in the book:

Arduino LEDs

We’ll need a resistor as well for the LEDs. As LEDs are current driven you can connect two in series with a suitable dropping resistor which allows you to control both if required with one digital output pin. You can use the calculator here to help determine the right value for the resistor.

Finally a servo is required to push the lid of the book up and down. We used an inexpensive micro servo that’s available from Tronixlabs:

Arduino servo

The chopsticks are cut down and used as an extension to the servo horn to give it more length:

Arduino servo mounted

Don’t forget to paint the arm black so it doesn’t stand out when in use. We had a lazy attack and mounted the servo on some LEGO bricks held in with super glue, but it works. Finally, here is the circuit schematic for our final example – we also added a power switch after the battery pack:

book monster schematic small

To recap  – this is a list of parts used:

After some delicate soldering the whole lot fits neatly in the box:

Arduino book monster final

Arduino Sketch

The behaviour of your “book monster” comes down to your imagination. Experiment with the servo angles and speed to simulate the lid opening as if the monster is creeping up, or quickly for a “pop-up” surprise. And again with the LED eyes you can blink them and alter the brightness with PWM. Here’s a quick sketch to give you an idea:

You can watch our example unit in this video.

Frankly the entire project is subjective, so just do what you want.

Conclusion

Well that was fun, and I am sure this will entertain many people. A relative is a librarian so this will adorn a shelf and hopefully give the children a laugh. Once again, thanks to the people from Evil Mad Science for the inspiration for this project – so go and buy something from their interesting range of kits and so on.

And if you enjoyed this article, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop”.

visit tronixlabs.com

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.
The following two tabs change content below.

John Boxall

Founder, owner and managing editor of tronixstuff.com.

Leave a Reply

Subscribe via email

Receive notifications of new posts by email.

Arduino Tutorials

Click for Detailed Chapter Index

Chapters 0 1 2 3 4
Chapters 5 6 6a 7 8
Chapters 9 10 11 12 13
Ch. 14 - XBee
Ch. 15 - RFID - RDM-630
Ch. 15a - RFID - ID-20
Ch. 16 - Ethernet
Ch. 17 - GPS - EM406A
Ch. 18 - RGB matrix - awaiting update
Ch. 19 - GPS - MediaTek 3329
Ch. 20 - I2C bus part I
Ch. 21 - I2C bus part II
Ch. 22 - AREF pin
Ch. 23 - Touch screen
Ch. 24 - Monochrome LCD
Ch. 25 - Analog buttons
Ch. 26 - GSM - SM5100 Uno
Ch. 27 - GSM - SM5100 Mega
Ch. 28 - Colour LCD
Ch. 29 - TFT LCD - coming soon...
Ch. 30 - Arduino + twitter
Ch. 31 - Inbuilt EEPROM
Ch. 32 - Infra-red control
Ch. 33 - Control AC via SMS
Ch. 34 - SPI bus part I
Ch. 35 - Video-out
Ch. 36 - SPI bus part II
Ch. 37 - Timing with millis()
Ch. 38 - Thermal Printer
Ch. 39 - NXP SAA1064
Ch. 40 - Push wheel switches
Ch. 40a - Wheel switches II
Ch. 41 - More digital I/O
Ch. 42 - Numeric keypads
Ch. 43 - Port Manipulation - Uno
Ch. 44 - ATtiny+Arduino
Ch. 45 - Ultrasonic Sensor
Ch. 46 - Analog + buttons II
Ch. 47 - Internet-controlled relays
Ch. 48 - MSGEQ7 Spectrum Analyzer
First look - Arduino Due
Ch. 49 - KTM-S1201 LCD modules
Ch. 50 - ILI9325 colour TFT LCD modules
Ch. 51 - MC14489 LED display driver IC
Ch. 52 - NXP PCF8591 ADC/DAC IC
Ch. 53 - TI ADS1110 16-bit ADC IC
Ch. 54 - NXP PCF8563 RTC
Ch. 55 - GSM - SIM900
Ch. 56 - MAX7219 LED driver IC
Ch. 57 - TI TLC5940 LED driver IC
Ch. 58 - Serial PCF8574 LCD Backpacks
Ch. 59 - L298 Motor Control
Ch. 60 - DS1307 and DS3231 RTC part I
Arduino Yún tutorials
pcDuino tutorials

The Arduino Book

Arduino Workshop

Für unsere deutschen Freunde

Dla naszych polskich przyjaciół ...

Australian Electronics!

Buy and support Silicon Chip - Australia's only Electronics Magazine.

Use of our content…

%d bloggers like this: