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Book – “Arduino Workshop – A Hands-On Introduction with 65 Projects”

Over the last few years I’ve been writing a few Arduino tutorials, and during this time many people have mentioned that I should write a book. And now thanks to the team from No Starch Press this recommendation has morphed into my new book – “Arduino Workshop“:

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Although there are seemingly endless Arduino tutorials and articles on the Internet, Arduino Workshop offers a nicely edited and curated path for the beginner to learn from and have fun. It’s a hands-on introduction to Arduino with 65 projects – from simple LED use right through to RFID, Internet connection, working with cellular communications, and much more.

Each project is explained in detail, explaining how the hardware an Arduino code works together. The reader doesn’t need any expensive tools or workspaces, and all the parts used are available from almost any electronics retailer. Furthermore all of the projects can be finished without soldering, so it’s safe for readers of all ages.

The editing team and myself have worked hard to make the book perfect for those without any electronics or Arduino experience at all, and it makes a great gift for someone to get them started. After working through the 65 projects the reader will have gained enough knowledge and confidence to create many things – and to continue researching on their own. Or if you’ve been enjoying the results of my thousands of hours of work here at tronixstuff, you can show your appreciation by ordering a copy for yourself or as a gift 🙂

You can review the table of contents, index and download a sample chapter from the Arduino Workshop website.

Arduino Workshop is available from No Starch Press in printed or ebook (PDF, Mobi, and ePub) formats. Ebooks are also included with the printed orders so you can get started immediately.

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In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, Arduino Workshop, book, books, cellular, clocks, display, distance, ds1307, DS3232, education, EEPROM, freetronics, GPS, graphic, GSM, hardware hacking, I2C, internet, LCD, learning electronics, lesson, no starch press, numeric keypad, part review, product review, projects, RDM630, RDM6300, relay, review, sensor, servo, SMS, time clock, timing, tronixstuff, tutorial, twitter, wireless, xbee13 Comments

Arduino, Android and Seeedstudio Bluetooth Bee

Introduction

In this article we examine the Seeedstudio “Bluetooth Bee” modules and how they can be used in a simple way in conjunction with Android devices to control the Arduino world.  Here is an example of a Bluetooth Bee:

For the curious, the hardware specifications are as follows:

  • Typical -80dBm sensitivity
  • Up to +4dBm RF transmit power
  • Fully Qualified Bluetooth V2.0+EDR 3Mbps Modulation
  • Low Power 1.8V Operation, 1.8 to 3.6V I/O
  • UART interface with programmable baud rate
  • Integrated PCB antenna.
  • XBee compatible headers

You may have noticed that the Bluetooth Bee looks similar to the Xbee-style data transceivers – and it is, in physical size and some pinouts, for example:

The neat thing with the BtB (Bluetooth Bee) is that it is compatible with Xbee sockets and Arduino shields. It is a 3.3V device and has the same pinouts for Vcc, GND, TX and RX – so an existing Xbee shield will work just fine.

In some situations you may want to use your BtB on one UART and have another for debugging or other data transport from an Arduino – which means the need for a software serial port. To do this you can get a “Bees Shield” which allows for two ‘Bee format transceivers on one board, which also has jumpers to select software serial pins for one of them. For example:

Although not the smallest, the Bees Shield proves very useful for experimenting and busy wireless data transmit/receive systems. More about the Bees Shield can be found on their product wiki.

Quick Start 

In the past many people have told me that bluetooth connectivity has been too difficult or expensive to work with. In this article I want to make things as simple as possible, allowing you to just move forward with your ideas and projects. One very useful function is to control an Arduino-compatible board with an Android-based mobile phone that has Bluetooth connectivity. Using the BtB we can create a wireless serial text bridge between the phone and the Arduino, allowing control and data transmission between the two.

We do this by using a terminal application on the Android device – for our examples we will be using “BlueTerm” which can be downloaded from Google Play – search for “blueterm” as shown below:

gplay1

In our Quick Start example, we will create a system where we can turn on or off four Arduino digital output pins from D4~D7. (If you are unsure about how to program an Arduino, please consider this short series of tutorials). The BtB is connected using the Bees shield. This is based on the demonstration sketch made available on the BtB Wiki page – we will use commands from the terminal on the Android device to control the Arduino board, which will then return back status.

As the BtB transmit and receive serial data we will have it ‘listen’ to the virtual serial port on pins 9 and 10 for incoming characters. Using a switch…case function it then makes decisions based on the incoming character. You can download the sketch from here. If you were to modify this sketch for your own use, study the void loop() section to see how the incoming data is interpreted, and how data is sent back to the Android terminal using blueToothSerial.println.

Before using it for the first time you will need to pair the BtB with your Android device. The PIN is set to a default of four zeros. After setting up the hardware and uploading the sketch, wait until the LEDs on the BtB blink alternately – at this point you can get a connection and start communicating. In the following video clip you can see the whole process:


Where to from here?

There are many more commands that can be set using terminal software from a PC with a Bluetooth adaptor, such as changing the PIN, device name and so on. All these are described in the BtB Wiki page along with installation instructions for various operating systems.

Once again I hope you found this article interesting and useful. The Bluetooth Bees are an inexpensive and useful method for interfacing your Arduino to other Bluetooth-compatible devices. For more information and product support, visit the Seeedstudio product pages.

Bluetooth Bees are available from Seeedstudio and their network of distributors.

Disclaimer – Bluetooth Bee products used in this article are promotional considerations made available by Seeedstudio.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in android, arduino, bluetooth, cellular, INT119B2P, lesson, seeedstudio, tutorial, WLS125E1P, xbee

Tutorial: Control AC outlets via SMS

Learn how to control AC outlets via SMS text message. This is chapter thirty-three of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 02/03/2013

Assumed understanding for this article is found in part one. If you have not already done so, please read and understand it.

In this chapter we will continue with the use of the SM5100 cellular shield to turn digital outputs on and off via SMS. However please read chapters twenty-six and twenty-seven first if you are unfamiliar with using the GSM shield with Arduino. As an extension of chapter twenty-seven, we will use our Arduino to turn on or off AC outlets via a common remote-control AC outlet pack. Please note this is more of a commentary of my own experience, and not an exact tutorial. In other words, by reading this I hope you will gain some ideas into doing the necessary modifications yourself and in your own way.

Firstly, we need some remote-control AC outlets. Most electrical stores or giant retail warehouses may have something like this:

originaloutletsss

Nothing too original, just a wireless remote control that can switch on or off receiver outlets on a choice of four radio frequencies. Before moving forward I would like to acknowledge that this article was inspired by the wonderful book Practical Arduino – Cool Projects for Open Source Hardware by Jon Oxer and Hugh Blemings. In chapter two an appliance remote-control system is devised using a similar system.

At first glance the theory behind this project is quite simple – using the hardware in example 27.2, instead of controlling LEDs, activate the buttons on the wireless remote control for the AC outlets – leaving us with AC outlets controlled via SMS. However there are a few things to keep in mind and as discovered during the process, various pitfalls as well.

Before voiding the warranty on your remote control, it would be wise to test the range of the remote control to ensure it will actually work in your situation. I found this was made a lot easier by connecting a radio to the remote outlet – then you can hear when the outlet is on or off. If this is successful, make a note of the amount of time required to press the on and off buttons – as we need to control the delay in our Arduino sketch.

The next step is to crack open the remote control:

originalremotess

… and see what we have to work with:

remotepcbss

Straight away there are two very annoying things – the first being the required power supply – 12 volts; and the second being the type of button contacts on the PCB. As you can see above we only have some minute PCB tracks to solder our wires to. It would be infinitely preferable to have a remote control that uses actual buttons soldered into a PCB, as you can easily desolder and replace them with wires to our Arduino system. However unless you can casually tear open the remote control packaging in the store before purchase, it can be difficult to determine the type of buttons in the remote.

As you can see in the photo above, there is an off and on pad/button each for four channels of receiver. In my example we will only use two of them to save time and space. The next question to solve is how to interface the Arduino digital outputs with the remote control. In Practical Arduino, the authors have used relays, but I don’t have any of those in stock. However I do have a quantity of common 4N25 optocouplers, so will use those instead. An optocoupler can be thought of as an electronic switch that is isolated from what is it controlling – see my article on optocouplers for more information.

Four optocouplers will be required, two for each radio channel. To mount them and the associated circuitry, we will use a blank protoshield and build the Arduino-remote control interface onto the shield. The circuitry for the optocoupler for each switch is very simple, we just need four of the following:

As the LED inside the optocoupler has a forward voltage of 1.2 volts at 10mA, the 390 ohm resistor is required as our Arduino digital out is 5 volts. Dout is connected to the particular digital out pin from the Arduino board. Pins 4 and 5 on the optocoupler are connected to each side of the button contact on our remote control.

The next consideration is the power supply. The remote control theoretically needs 12 volts, however the included battery only measured just over nine. However for the optimum range, the full 12 should be supplied. To save worrying about the battery, our example will provide 12V to the remote control. Furthermore, we also need to supply 5 volts at a higher current rating that can be supplied by our Arduino. In the previous GSM chapters, I have emphasised that the GSM shield can possibly draw up to two amps in current. So once again, please ensure your power supply can deliver the required amount of current. From experience in my location, I know that the GSM shield draws around 400~600 milliamps of current – which makes things smaller and less complex.

The project will be supplied 12 volts via a small TO-92 style 78L12 regulator, and 5 volts via a standard TO-220 style 7805 regulator. You could always use a 7812, the 78L12 was used as the current demand is lower and the casing is smaller. The power for the whole project will come from a 15V DC 1.5A power supply. So our project’s power supply schematic will be as follows:

Now to mount the optocouplers and the power circuitry on the blank protoshield. Like most things in life it helps to make a plan before moving forward. I like to use graph paper, each square representing a hole on the protoshield, to plan the component layout. For example:

It isn’t much, but it can really help. Don’t use mine – create your own, doing so is good practice. After checking the plan over, it is a simple task to get the shield together. Here is my prototype example:

shieldss

It isn’t neat, but it works. The header pins are used to make connecting the wires a little easier, and the pins on the right hand side are used to import the 15V and export 12V for the remote. While the soldering iron is hot, the wires need to be soldered to the remote control. Due to the unfortunate size of the PCB tracks, there wasn’t much space to work with:

txsolder1ss

But with time and patience, the wiring was attached:

txsolder2ss

Again, as this is a prototype the aesthetics of the modification are not that relevant. Be careful when handling the remote, as any force on the wiring can force the soldered wire up and break the PCB track. After soldering each pair of wires to the button pads, use the continuity function of a multimeter to check for shorts and adjust your work if necessary.

At this stage the AC remote control shield prototype is complete. It can be tested with a simple sketch to turn on and off the related digital outputs. For example, the following sketch will turn on and off each outlet in sequence:

Now to get connected with our GSM shield. It is a simple task to insert the remote shield over the GSM shield combination, and to connect the appropriate power supply and (for example) GSM aerial. The control sketch is a slight modification of example 27.2, and is shown below

The variable pressdelay stores the amount of time in milliseconds to ‘press’ a remote control button. To control our outlets, we send a text message using the following syntax:

Where a/b are remote channels one and two, and x is replaced with 0 for off and 1 for on.

So there you have it – controlling almost any AC powered device via text message from a cellular phone. Imagine trying to do that ten, or even five years ago. As always, now it is up to you and your imagination to find something to control or get up to other shenanigans.

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Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in AC power, arduino, CEL-00675, CEL-09607, cellphone hacking, cellular, GSM, hardware hacking, lesson, SM5100, SMS, tutorial

Moving Forward with Arduino – Chapter 30 – twitter

Learn how to tweet from your Arduino in chapter thirty of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe.

[Updated 26/7/2013]

In this article we will learn how to send messages from our Arduino to twitter. For the uninitiated who may be thinking “what is all this twitter nonsense about?”, twitter is a form of microblogging. You can create a message with a maximum length of 140 characters, and broadcast this on the twitter service. For people to receive your messages (or tweets) they also need to be a member of twitter and choose to subscribe to your tweets.

Generally people will use the twitter service using one of three methods: using a web browser on a personal computer or internet device, on a mobile phone, or using a specific application such as TweetDeck on one of the aforementioned devices. For example, here is a typical web browser view:

And here is an example of a twitter application running on an Android OS smartphone:

tweetdeck

So as you can see, it is easy enough to read peoples’ tweets. Therein lies the reason for this article – we can harness twitter as an output device for our Arduino systems. We can broadcast various messages, so systems can be created to monitor specific parameters and report on their status at regular intervals, upon an event occurring, and so on.

In some areas, you can set twitter to send tweets from a certain user to your mobile phone via SMS – however if doing so be careful to confirm possible charges to your mobile phone account. Finally, if you are worried about privacy with regards to your tweets, you can set your account to private and only allow certain people to follow your tweets.

So let’s get started. First of all – you will need a twitter account. If you do not have one, you can sign up for one here. If you already have a twitter account, you can always open more for other uses – such as an Arduino. For example, my twitter account is @tronixstuff, but my demonstration machine twitter account is @tronixstuff2. Then I have set my primary account to follow my machine’s twitter account. Once you have logged into twitter with your machine account, visit this page and get yourself a token by following the Step One link. Save your token somewhere safe, you’ll need to insert it into your Arduino sketch.

Next, you will need some hardware. Apart from your usual Arduino board, you will need an Ethernet shield. However to save space and money I’ll be using the Freetronics EtherTen:

If you are unfamiliar with using Arduino and Ethernet, please review chapter sixteen before continuing forward with this article. From a software perspective, we will need another library for our Arduino IDE. Download and install the twitter library from here. Now, at this point – please run the Webserver example described in chapter sixteen and ensure it is working before moving forward from this point. While you do that, we’ll have a break…

lopburi-0606

Now it is time to send our first tweet. The following sketch is a modification of the demonstration version, in which we have isolated the tweet-sending into a separate function called (strangely enough) tweet();. It is not complex at all:

So after uploading the above sketch, running a network cable from your access point to the Ethernet shield, and powering up the Arduino board – your tweet should appear as such:

Excellent – it works. And I hope yours did as well. If it did not, open the serial monitor box to get some feedback from the sketch. From experimentation the most amount of errors are caused by incorrect IP and trying to send multiple tweets too quickly. If you get excited and try to run the sketch again by hitting reset, twitter will reply back with an error – it does not allow duplicate tweets to be sent (over a short period of time). Twitter will reply to your tweet with a code which describes the result of your tweet. This code is stored in an integer variable using the function:

For example, 200 means the tweet was sent successfully, and 403 means you have attempted a duplicate tweet. However you can omit the code-checking if you are not fussed about your tweet’s status.

Although it was fun tweeting Hello world, let’s create an example that reacts to various events and tweets about them. To simulate some events I have connected four buttons to digital inputs (using the button board from chapter twelve). Pressing a button sends of the matching message. However you can use any form of digital output or decision-making in your sketch. For now, here is the example sketch:

And here is a screen shot of the results after pressing buttons one, four, two then three:

So there you have it, another useful way to send information from your Arduino to the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. Big thanks to @neocat for their work with the twitter  Arduino libraries.

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Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, cellular, ethernet, learning electronics, microcontrollers, tutorial, twitter2 Comments

Tutorial: Arduino and GSM Cellular – Part Two

Continue to learn about connecting your Arduino to the cellular network with the SM5100 GSM module shield. This is chapter twenty-seven of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 02/03/2013

Assumed understanding for this article is found in part one. If you have not already done so, please read and understand it. In this instalment we continue with bare projects which you can use as a framework for your own creations.

Reach out and control something

First we will discuss how to make something happen by a simple telephone call. And the best thing is that we don’t need the the GSM module to answer the telephone call (thereby saving money) – just let the module ring a few times. How is this possible? Very easily. Recall example 26.1 – we monitored the activity of the GSM module by using our terminal software. In this case what we need to do is have our Arduino examine the text coming in from the serial output of the GSM module, and look for a particular string of characters.

When we telephone the GSM module from another number, the module returns the text as shown in the image below:

term2

We want to look for the text “RING”, as (obviously) this means that the GSM shield has recognised the ring signal from the exchange. Therefore need our Arduino to count the number of rings for the particular telephone call being made to the module. (Memories – Many years ago we would use public telephones to send messages to each other. For example, after arriving at a foreign destination we would call home and let the phone ring five times then hang up – which meant we had arrived safely). Finally, once the GSM shield has received a set number of rings, we want the Arduino to do something.

From a software perspective, we need to examine each character as it is returned from the GSM shield. Once an “R” is received, we examine the next character. If it is an “I”, we examine the next character. If it is an “N”, we examine the next character. If it is a “G”, we know an inbound call is being attempted, and one ring has occurred. We can set the number of rings to wait until out desired function is called. In the following example, when the shield is called, it will call the function doSomething() after three rings.

The function doSomething() controls two LEDs, one red, one green. Every time the GSM module is called for 3 rings, the Arduino alternately turns on or off the LEDs. Using this sketch as an example, you now have the ability to turn basically anything on or off, or call your own particular function. Another example would be to return some type of data, for example you could dial in and have the Arduino send you a text message containing temperature data.

And now for a quick video demonstration. The first call is made, and the LEDs go from red (off) to green (on). A second call is made, and the LEDs go from green (on) to red (off). Although this may seem like an over-simplified example, with your existing Ardiuno knowledge you now have the ability to run any function by calling your GSM shield.

Control Digital I/O via SMS

Now although turning one thing on or off is convenient, how can we send more control information to our GSM module? For example, control four or more digital outputs at once? These sorts of commands can be achieved by the reception and analysis of text messages.

Doing so is similar to the method we used in example 27.1. Once again, we will analyse the characters being sent from the GSM module via its serial out. However, there are two AT commands we need to send to the GSM module before we can receive SMSs, and one afterwards. The first one you already know:

Which sets the SMS mode to text. The second command is:

This command tells the GSM module to immediately send any new SMS data to the serial out. An example of this is shown in the terminal capture below:

smsrxdemo

Two text messages have been received since the module was turned on. You can see how the data is laid out. The blacked out number is the sender of the SMS. The number +61418706700 is the number for my carrier’s SMSC (short message service centre). Then we have the date and time. The next line is the contents of the text message – what we need to examine in our sketch.

The second text message in the example above is how we will structure our control SMS. Our sketch will wait for a # to come from the serial line, then consider the values after a, b, c and d – 0 for off, 1 for on. Finally, we need to send one more command to the GSM module after we have interpreted our SMS:

This deletes all the text messages from the SIM card. As there is a finite amount of storage space on the SIM, it is prudent to delete the incoming message after we have followed the instructions within. But now for our example. We will control four digital outputs, D9~12. For the sake of the exercise we are controlling an LED on each digital output, however you could do anything you like. Although the sketch may seem long and complex, it is not – just follow it through and you will see what is happening:

And now for a video demonstration:

So there you have it – controlling your Arduino digital outputs via a normal telephone or SMS. Now it is up to you and your imagination to find something to control, sensor data to return, or get up to other shenanigans.

If you enjoyed this article, you may find this of interest – controlling AC power outlets via SMS.

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Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, CEL-00675, CEL-09607, cellphone hacking, cellular, GSM, hardware hacking, lesson, microcontrollers, SM5100, SMS, tutorial

Tutorial – Arduino Uno and SM5100B GSM Cellular

Shield is now obsolete. Contact your hardware supplier for support.

Posted in arduino, CEL-00675, CEL-09607, cellphone hacking, cellular, GSM, lesson, SMS, tronixstuff, tutorial


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