Archive | microcontrollers

Kit review – nootropic design Hackvision

Hello readers

Time for another kit review – the nootropics design Hackvision,  a nice change from test equipment. The purpose of the Hackvision is to allow the user to create retro-style arcade games and so on that can be played on a monitor or television set with analogue video input. Although the display resolution is only 128 by 96 pixels, this is enough to get some interesting action happening. Frankly I didn’t think the Arduino hardware environment alone was capable of this, so the Hackvision was a pleasant surprise.

Assembly is quick and relatively simple, the instructions are online and easy to follow. All the parts required are included:

partsss

The microcontroller is pre-loaded with two games so you can start playing once construction has finished. However you will need a 5V FTDI cable if you wish to upload new games as the board does not have a USB interface. The board is laid out very clearly, and with the excellent silk-screen and your eyes open construction will be painless. Note that you don’t need to install R4 unless necessary, and if your TV system is PAL add the link which is between the RCA sockets. Speaking of which, when soldering them in, bend down the legs to lock them in before soldering, as such:

Doing so will keep them nicely flush with the PCB whilst soldering. Once finished you should have something like this:

almostdoness

All there is to do now is click the button covers into place, plug in your video and audio RCA leads to a monitor, insert nine volts of DC power, and go:

doness

Nice one. For the minimalist users out there, be careful if playing games as the solder on the rear of the PCB can be quite sharp. Included with the kit is some adhesive rubber matting to attach to the underside to smooth everything off nicely. However only fit this once you have totally finished with soldering and modifying the board, otherwise it could prove difficult to remove neatly later on. Time to play some gamesin the following video you can see how poor my reflexes are when playing Pong and Space Invaders:

[ … the Hackvision also generates sounds, however my cheap $10 video capture dongle from eBay didn’t come through with the audio … ]

Well that takes me back. There are some more contemporary games and demonstration code available on the Hackvision games web page. For the more involved Hackvision gamer, there are points on the PCB to attach your own hand-held controls such as paddles, nunchuks and so on. There is a simple tutorial on how to make your own paddles here.

Those who have been paying attention will have noticed that although the Hackvision PCB is not the standard Arduino Duemilanove-compatible layout, all the electronics are there. Apart from I/O pins used by the game buttons, you have a normal Arduino-style board with video and audio out. This opens up a whole world of possibilities with regards to the display of data in your own Arduino sketches (software). From a power supply perspective, note that the regulator is a 78L05 which is only good for 100mA of current, and the board itself uses around 25mA.

To control the video output, you will need to download and install the hackvision-version arduino-tvout library. Note that this library is slightly different to the generic arduino-tvout library with regards to function definitions and parameters. To make use of the included buttons easier, there is also the controllers library. Here is a simple, relatively self-explanatory sketch that demonstrates some uses of the tvout functions:

And the resulting video demonstration:

I will be the first to admit that my imagination is lacking some days. However with the sketch above hopefully you can get a grip on how the functions work. But there are some very good game implementations out there, as listed on the Hackvision games page. After spending some time with this kit, I feel that there is a lack of documentation that is easy to get into. Sure, having some great games published is good but some beginners’ tutorials would be nice as well. However if you have the time and the inclination, there is much that could be done. In the meanwhile you can do your own sleuthing with regards to the functions by examining the TVout.cpp file in the Hackvision tvout library folder.

For further questions about the Hackvision contact nootropic design or perhaps post on their forum. However the Hackvision has a lot of potential and is an interesting extension of the Arduino-based hardware universe – another way to send data to video monitors and televisions, and play some fun games.If you are looking for a shield-based video output device, perhaps consider the Batsocks Tellymate.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow me on twitter or facebook, or join our Google Group for further discussion.

High resolution images are available on flickr.

[Note – The kit was purchased by myself personally and reviewed without notifying the manufacturer or retailer]

Posted in arduino, games, hackvision, kit review, LCD, microcontrollers, notropics2 Comments

Tutorial: Arduino and the SPI bus

Learn how to use the SPI data bus with Arduino in chapter thirty-four of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A seemingly endless tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here

[Updated 10/01/2013]

This is the first of two chapters in which we are going to start investigating the SPI data bus, and how we can control devices using it with our Arduino systems. The SPI bus may seem to be a complex interface to master, however with some brief study of this explanation and practical examples you will soon become a bus master! To do this we will learn the necessary theory, and then apply it by controlling a variety of devices. In this tutorial things will be kept as simple as possible.

But first of all, what is it? And some theory…

SPI is an acronym for “Serial Peripheral Interface”. It is a synchronous serial data bus – data can travel in both directions at the same time, as opposed to (for example) the I2C bus that cannot do so. To allow synchronous data transmission, the SPI bus uses four wires. They are called:

  • MOSI – Master-out, Slave-in. This line carries data from our Arduino to the SPI-controlled device(s);
  • MISO – Master-in, Slave out. This line carries data from the SPI-controlled device(s) back to the Arduino;
  • SS – Slave-select. This line tells the device on the bus we wish to communicate with it. Each SPI device needs a unique SS line back to the Arduino;
  • SCK – Serial clock.

Within these tutorials we consider the Arduino board to be the master and the SPI devices to be slaves. On our Arduino Duemilanove/Uno and compatible boards the pins used are:

  • SS – digital 10. You can use other digital pins, but 10 is generally the default as it is next to the other SPI pins;
  • MOSI – digital 11;
  • MISO – digital 12;
  • SCK – digital 13;

Arduino Mega users – MISO is 50, MOSI is 51, SCK is 52 and SS is usually 53. If you are using an Arduino Leonardo, the SPI pins are on the ICSP header pins. See here for more information. You can control one or more devices with the SPI bus. For example, for one device the wiring would be:

Data travels back and forth along the MOSI and MISO lines between our Arduino and the SPI device. This can only happen when the SS line is set to LOW. In other words, to communicate with a particular SPI device on the bus, we set the SS line to that device to LOW, then communicate with it, then set the line back to HIGH. If we have two or more SPI devices on the bus, the wiring would resemble the following:


Notice how there are two SS lines – we need one for each SPI device on the bus. You can use any free digital output pin on your Arduino as an SS line. Just remember to have all SS lines high except for the line connected to the SPI device you wish to use at the time.

Data is sent to the SPI device in byte form. You should know by now that eight bits make one byte, therefore representing a binary number with a value of between zero and 255. When communicating with our SPI devices, we need to know which way the device deals with the data – MSB or LSB first. MSB (most significant bit) is the left-hand side of the binary number, and LSB (least significant bit) is the right-hand side of the number. That is:

Apart from sending numerical values along the SPI bus, binary numbers can also represent commands. You can represent eight on/off settings using one byte of data, so a device’s parameters can be set by sending a byte of data. These parameters will vary with each device and should be illustrated in the particular device’s data sheet. For example, a digital potentiometer IC with six pots:

sdata

This device requires two bytes of data. The ADDR byte tells the device which of six potentiometers to control (numbered 0 to 5), and the DATA byte is the value for the potentiometer (0~255). We can use integers to represent these two values. For example, to set potentiometer number two to 125, we would send 2 then 125 to the device.

How do we send data to SPI devices in our sketches?

First of all, we need to use the SPI library. It is included with the default Arduino IDE installation, so put the following at the start of your sketch:

Next, in void.setup() declare which pin(s) will be used for SS and set them as OUTPUT. For example,

where ss has previously been declared as an integer of value ten. Now, to activate the SPI bus:

and finally we need to tell the sketch which way to send data, MSB or LSB first by using

or

When it is time to send data down the SPI bus to our device, three things need to happen. First, set the digital pin with SS to low:

Then send the data in bytes, one byte at a time using:

Value can be an integer/byte between zero and 255. Finally, when finished sending data to your device, end the transmission by setting SS high:

Sending data is quite simple. Generally the most difficult part for people is interpreting the device data sheet to understand how commands and data need to be structured for transmission. But with some practice, these small hurdles can be overcome.

Now for some practical examples!

Time to get on the SPI bus and control some devices. By following the examples below, you should gain a practical understanding of how the SPI bus and devices can be used with our Arduino boards.

Example 34.1

Our first example will use a simple yet interesting part – a digital potentiometer (we also used one in the I2C tutorial). This time we have a Microchip MCP4162-series 10k rheostat:


Here is the data sheet.pdf for your perusal. To control it we need to send two bytes of data – the first byte is the control byte, and thankfully for this example it is always zero (as the address for the wiper value is 00h [see table 4-1 of the data sheet]).  The second byte is the the value to set the wiper, which controls the resistance. So to set the wiper we need to do three things in our sketch…

First, set the SS (slave select) line to low:

Then send the two byes of data:

Finally set the SS line back to high:

Easily done. Connection to our Arduino board is very simple – consider the MCP4162 pinout:

Vdd connects to 5V, Vss to GND, CS to digital 10, SCK to digital 13, SDI to digital 11 and SDO to digital 12. Now let’s run through the available values of the MCP4162 in the following sketch:

Now to see the results of the sketch. In the following video clip, a we run up through the resistance range and measure the rheostat value with a multimeter:

Before moving forward, if digital potentiometers are new for you, consider reading this short guide written by Microchip about the differences between mechanical and digital potentiometers.

Example 34.2

In this example, we will use the Analog Devices AD5204 four-channel digital potentiometer (data sheet.pdf). It contains four 10k ohm linear potentiometers, and each potentiometer is adjustable to one of 256 positions. The settings are volatile, which means they are not remembered when the power is turned off. Therefore when power is applied the potentiometers are all pre set to the middle of the scale. Our example is the SOIC-24 surface mount example, however it is also manufactured in DIP format as well.

 

To make life easier it can be soldered onto a SOIC breakout board which converts it to a through-hole package:

ad5204boardss

In this example, we will control the brightness of four LEDs. Wiring is very simple. Pinouts are in the data sheet.pdf.

ex34p2schematic

And the sketch:

The function allOff() and allOn() are used to set the potentiometers to minimum and maximum respectively. We use allOff() at the start of the sketch to turn the LEDs off. This is necessary as on power-up the wipers are generally set half-way. Furthermore we use them in the blinkAll() function to … blink the LEDs. The function setPot() accepts a wiper number (0~3) and value to set that wiper (0~255). Finally the function indFade() does a nice job of fading each LED on and off in order – causing an effect very similar to pulse-width modulation.

Finally, here it is in action:

Example 34.3

In this example, we will use use a four-digit, seven-segment LED display that has an SPI interface. Using such a display considerably reduces the amount of pins required on the micro controller and also negates the use of shift register ICs which helps reduce power consumption and component count. The front of our example:

7segfrss

and the rear:

7segrearss

Thankfully the pins are labelled quite clearly. Please note that the board does not include header pins – they were soldered in after receiving the board. Although this board is documented by Sparkfun there seems to be issues in the operation, so instead we will use a sketch designed by members of the Arduino forum. Not wanting to ignore this nice piece of hardware we will see how it works and use it with the new sketch from the forum.

Again, wiring is quite simple:

  • Board GND to Arduino GND
  • Board VCC to Arduino 5V
  • Board SCK to Arduino D12
  • Board SI to Arduino D11
  • Board CSN to Arduino D10

The sketch is easy to use, you need to replicate all the functions as well as the library calls and variable definitions. To display numbers (or the letters A~F) on the display, call the function

where a is the number to display, b is the base system used (2 for binary, 8 for octal, 10 for usual, and 16 for hexadecimal), and c is for padded zeros (0 =off, 1=on). If you look at the void loop() part of the example sketch, we use all four number systems in the demonstration. If your number is too large for the display, it will show OF for overflow. To control the decimal points, colon and the LED at the top-right the third digit, we can use the following:

After all that, here is the demonstration sketch for your perusal:

And a short video of the demonstration:

So there you have it – hopefully an easy to understand introduction to the world of the SPI bus and how to control the devices within. As always, now it is up to you and your imagination to find something to control or get up to other shenanigans. In the next SPI article we will look at reading and writing data via the SPI bus.

LEDborder

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS usng the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in AD5204, arduino, COM-09767, education, learning electronics, lesson, MCP4162, microcontrollers, SPI, tutorial32 Comments

Discovering Arduino’s internal EEPROM lifespan

How long does the internal EEPROM of an Atmel ATmega328 last for? Let’s find out…

Updated 18/03/2013

Some time ago I published a short tutorial concerning the use of the internal EEPROM  belonging to the Atmel ATmega328 (etc.) microcontroller in our various Arduino boards. Although making use of the EEPROM is certainly useful, it has a theoretical finite lifespan – according to the Atmel data sheet (download .pdf) it is 100,000 write/erase cycles.

One of my twitter followers asked me “is that 100,000 uses per address, or the entire EEPROM?” – a very good question. So in the name of wanton destruction I have devised a simple way to answer the question of EEPROM lifespan. Inspired by the Dangerous Prototypes’ Flash Destroyer, we will write the number 170 (10101010 in binary) to each EEPROM address, then read each EEPROM address to check the stored number. The process is then repeated by writing the number 85 (01010101 in binary) to each address and then checking it again. The two binary numbers were chosen to ensure each bit in an address has an equal number of state changes.

After both of the processes listed above has completed, then the whole lot repeats. The process is halted when an incorrectly stored number is read from the EEPROM – the first failure. At this point the number of cycles, start and end time data are shown on the LCD.

In this example one cycle is 1024 sequential writes then reads. One would consider the entire EEPROM to be unusable after one false read, as it would be almost impossible to keep track of  individual damaged EEPROM addresses. (Then again, a sketch could run a write/read check before attempting to allocate data to the EEPROM…)

If for some reason you would like to run this process yourself, please do not do so using an Arduino Mega, or another board that has a fixed microcontroller. (Unless for some reason you are the paranoid type and need to delete some data permanently). Once again, please note that the purpose of this sketch is to basically destroy your Arduino’s EEPROM. Here is the sketch:

If you are unfamiliar with the time-keeping section, please see part one of my Arduino+I2C tutorial. The LCD used was my quickie LCD shield – more information about that here. Or you could always just send the data to the serial monitor box – however you would need to leave the PC on for a loooooong time… So instead the example sat on top of an AC adaptor (wall wart) behind a couch (sofa)  for a couple of months:

The only catch with running it from AC was the risk of possible power outages. We had one planned outage when our house PV system was installed, so I took a count reading before the mains was turned off, and corrected the sketch before starting it up again after the power cut. Nevertheless, here is a short video – showing the start and the final results of the test:


So there we have it, 1230163 cycles with each cycle writing and reading each individual EEPROM address. If repeating this odd experiment, your result will vary.

Well I hope someone out there found this interesting. Please refrain from sending emails or comments criticising the waste of a microcontroller – this was a one off.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, atmega328, atmel, EEPROM, hardware hacking, lesson, microcontrollers, projects, tutorial5 Comments

April 2011 Competition – Results

Competition over!

Posted in competition, games, microcontrollers0 Comments

Kit review – Freeduino v1.22 Arduino-compatible

Hello readers

Time again for another kit review. Today we will examine the Freeduino Arduino Duemilanove-compatible board in a kit. It is always interesting to see how the different types and makes of Arduino-compatible boards present themselves, so this is review is an extension of that curiosity. This kit was originally designed by NKC Electronics and released under a Creative Commons license.

The packaging can either be classed as underwhelming or environmentally-friendly, as the kit arrives in several plastic resealable bags. Upon emptying them out we are presented with the following, the parts:

partsss

and the PCB:

pcbss1

Hopefully you noticed what ends up being the key features of this kit – the pre-soldered FTDI IC and mini-USB socket. This means the Freeduino can be used with a USB cable (not included) and not an expensive FTDI cable. The PCB itself is very solid, has a very descriptive silk-screen layer with all the component positions labelled, is solder-masked, and has nice rounded corners.

Reviewing the included parts did make me wonder why the supplier has used 5% carbon-film resistors and ceramic capacitors instead of polyesters (except for one). It turns out that Seeedstudio (the distributor for my example kit) claim 5% resistors are easier to read. Originally I claimed that this was an excuse to save a few cents, however a few people have said that such resistors are easier to read.

Furthermore, this one missed out on the polyfuse for USB overcurrent and short-circuit protection. And whether or not the larger tolerances affect the operation of the board, the cheaper components make the finished product look very 1977. However on a brighter note, an IC socket is included.

Assembly was quick and simple, and you can also follow the silk-screen labels on the PCB as well. A good method is to start with the lowest-profile components, such as resistors and capacitors:

solder2ss

… then followed by the capacitors, crystal, LEDs and reset button:

solder3ss

Notice how the ceramic capacitors lead-spacing is too narrow for the holes on the PCB – this makes me think that the distributor has skimped out on the final product and been too lazy to update the PCB layout. The ATmega168 label is an example of this. Moving forward, the voltage regulator and sockets. The easiest way to solder in the shield sockets is to place them into the pins of an Arduino shield and solder – as such:

solder4ss

And there you have it, one Freeduino v1.22 Arduino Duemilanove-compatible board:

finishedss1

The image above also displays another bugbear with this kit – the LED placement. When you have a shield inserted, all of the LEDs are covered up. Furthermore, unlike other Arduino board kits you are stuck with the maximum current output of 50mA for the 3.3V rail as there isn’t a dedicated 3.3V voltage regulator on board. Finally, the power switching between USB and the DC socket is controlled with a jumper and header pins between the USB socket and the 7805 voltage regulator.

Although I might have sounded a little harsh about this kit, it is relatively inexpensive, easy to assemble, and has the USB interface onboard. These are all good things. However the PCB layout could have been improved by correctly spacing the holes for the ceramic capacitors, and moving the LEDs to the end of the board so they are visible with shields inserted. What’s the point of having all those LEDs if you cannot see them…

So if you really get the urge to make your own board with the USB interface, or want to give someone some reasonable soldering practice, this isn’t a bad choice at all. High resolution images are available on flickr. You can order your own Freeduino from Tronixlabs.

And finally a plug for my own store – tronixlabs.com – offering a growing range and Australia’s best value for supported hobbyist electronics from adafruit, DFRobot, Freetronics, Seeed Studio and much much more.

visit tronixlabs.com

As always, have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website.

Posted in ARD107B1P, arduino, freeduino, kit review, microcontrollers, tronixlabs, tronixstuff7 Comments

April 2011 Competition

Competition over!

Posted in competition, games, microcontrollers0 Comments

Tutorial: Arduino and Infra-red control

Learn how to use Arduino and infra-red remote controls in chapter thirty-two of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 10/07/2013

In this article we will look at something different to the usual, and hopefully very interesting and useful – interfacing our Arduino systems with infra-red receivers. Why would we want to do this? To have another method to control our Ardiuno-based systems, using simple infra-red remote controls.

A goal of this article is to make things as easy as possible, so we will not look into the base detail of how things work – instead we will examine how to get things done. If you would like a full explanation of infra-red, perhaps see the page on Wikipedia. The remote controls you use for televisions and so on transmit infra-red beam which is turned on and off at a very high speed – usually 38 kHz, to create bits of serial data which are then interpreted by the receiving unit. As the wavelength of infra-red light is too high for human eyes, we cannot see it. However using a digital camera – we can. Here is a demonstration video of IR codes being sent via a particularly fun kit – the adafruit TV-B-Gone:

Now to get started. You will need a remote control, and a matching IR receiver device. The hardware and library used in this tutorial only  supports NEC, Sony SIRC, Philips RC5, Philips RC6, and raw IR protocols. Or you can purchase a matching set for a good price, such as this example:

irpackage

Or you may already have a spare remote laying around somewhere. I kept this example from my old Sony Trinitron CRT TV after it passed away:

sonyremote1

It will more than suffice for a test remote. Now for a receiver – if you have purchased the remote/receiver set, you have a nice unit that is ready to be wired into your Arduino, and also a great remote that is compact and easy to carry about. To connect your receiver module – as per the PCB labels, connect Vcc to Arduino 5V, GND to Arduino GND, and D (the data line) to Arduino digital pin 11.

Our examples use pin 11, however you can alter that later on. If you are using your own remote control, you will just need a receiver module. These are very cheap, and an ideal unit is the Vishay TSOP4138 (data sheet .pdf). These are available from element-14 and the other usual retail suspects. They are also dead-simple to use. Looking at the following example:

From left to right the pins are data, GND and Vcc (to Arduino +5V). So it can be easily wired into a small breadboard for testing purposes. Once you have your remote and receiver module connected, you need to take care of the software side of things. There is a new library to download and install, download it from here. Please note that library doesn’t work for Arduino Leonardo, Freetronics Leostick, etc with ATmega32U4. Instead, use this library (and skip the modification steps below). Extract the IRremote folder and place into the ..\arduinoxxx\libraries folder. Then restart your Arduino IDE if it was already open.

Using Arduino IDE v1.0 or greater? Open the file “IRRemoteInt.h” in the library folder, and change the line

Then save and close the file, restart the Arduino IDE and you’re set.

With our first example, we will receive the commands from our remote control and display them on the serial monitor:

Open the serial monitor box, point your remote control to the receiver and start pressing away. You should see something like this:

What have we here? Lots of hexadecimal numbers. Did you notice that each button on your remote control resulted in an individual hexadecimal number? I hope so. The number FFFFFFFF means that the button was held down. The remote used was from a yum-cha discount TV. Now I will try again with the Sony remote:

This time, each button press resulted in the same code three times. This is peculiar to Sony IR systems. However nothing to worry about. Looking back at the sketch for example 32.1, the

section is critical – if a code has been received, the code within the if statement is executed. The hexadecimal code is stored in the variable

with which we can treat as any normal hexadecimal number. At this point, press a few buttons on your remote control, and take a note of the matching hexadecimal codes that relate to each button. We will need these codes for the next example…

Now we know how to convert the infra-red magic into numbers, we can create sketches to have our Arduino act on particular commands. As the IR library returns hexadecimal numbers, we can use simple decision functions to take action. In the following example, we use switch…case to examine each inbound code, then execute a function. In this case we have an LCD module connected via I2C, and the sketch is programmed to understand fifteen Sony IR codes. If you don’t have an LCD you could always send the output to the serial monitor. If you are using the DFRobot I2C LCD display, you need to use Arduino v23.

Furthermore you can substitute your own values if not using Sony remote controls. Finally, this sketch has a short loop after the translateIR(); function call which ignores the following two codes – we do this as Sony remotes send the same code three times. Again. you can remove this if necessary. Note that when using hexadecimal numbers in our sketch we preced them with 0x:

And here it is in action:


You might be thinking “why would I want to make things appear on the LCD like that?”. The purpose of the example is to show how to react to various IR commands. You can replace the LCD display functions with other functions of your choosing.

At the start working with infra-red may have seemed to be complex, but with the previous two examples it should be quite simple by now. So there you have it, another useful way to control our Arduino systems. Hopefully you have some ideas on how to make use of this technology. In future articles we will examine creating and sending IR codes from our Arduino. Furthermore, a big thanks to Ken Shirriff for his Arduino library.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, control, DFR0107, dfrobot, education, infrared, IR, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, remote, tronixstuff, tutorial17 Comments

Arduino Game: Tic-Tac-Toe

[Updated 19/02/2013]

Let’s recreate the game of Tic-tac-toe with our Arduino systems. This game is also known as Noughts and Crosses or Three-in-a-row. Whatever we call it, I’m sure you will be familiar with the game from your childhood or general messing about. For the uninitiated, there is an excellent explanation of the game over at Wikipedia.

tttboard

In the following examples, a human will play against the machine (Arduino). The demonstration sketches are almost identical except for one function – machineMove();. This function contains the method of deciding a move for the machine. By localising the machine’s decision making into that function we can experiment with levels of intelligence without worrying about the rest of the sketch. In writing this article it is assumed the reader has some basic Arduino or programming experience. If not, perhaps read some of my Arduino tutorials indexed here.

However first we will examine the hardware. I have used my well-worn Freetronics Eleven board, which is equivalent to the Arduino Uno. For a display, the Sparkfun LCD shield is used. For user input we have two buttons connected to digital pins 6 and 7, using 10k pull-down resistors as normal. The buttons are wired via a ScrewShield set. To save time I have used my generic button-board, whose schematic is below:

example12p3schematic

 

If you were to construct a more permanent example, this could be easily done. One could possibly use a DS touch-screen over their LCD. Perhaps for mark II? Nevertheless, time to move on. Now to explain how the sketch works – please download a copy from here so you can follow along with the explanation.

I have tried to make the sketch as modular as possible to make it easy to follow and modify. The sketch itself is relatively simple. We use an array board[] to map the pieces of the game board in memory – board[0] being the top-left and board[8] being the bottom-right position. We create a graphical representation of the board by drawing rectangles for the horizontal and vertical lines, lines to form crosses, and circles for … circles. The function drawBoard(); takes care of the board lines and calls drawPiece(); to place the players’ pieces. drawBoard(); reads the board[] array to determine if a position is blank (zero), a nought (1) or a cross (2).

The flow of the sketch is easy to follow. First the function introScreen() is called – it displays the introductory screen. Then drawBoard() is called to draw the initially-blank game board. Then the main function playGame(); is called. We have a global variable winner, whose value determine the winner of the game (0 – game still in play, 1 – human, 2 – machine, 3 – draw). playGame(); and other functions will refer to winner throughout the sketch. Within playGame();, the human and machine take turns placing their pieces. The function humanMove(); accepts the human’s choice in piece position, storing it into board[], and not allowing false moves. The function machineMove(); controls the decision-making process for the machine’s moves. In the first example, the machine moves by randomly selecting a board position. If the position is taken, another random position is selected (and so on) until a valid move can be made.

After each instance of humanMove(); and machineMove();, the function checkWinner(); is called. This function compares the contents of the array board[] against all possible scenarios for a win by either player, and calls the function drawTest(); – which checks for a draw – and stores the result in the variable winner as described earlier. Checking for a win is simple, however checking for a draw was a little more complex. This involves counting the number of 1s and 2s in the board[] array. If there are five 1s and four 2s or four 1s and five 2s ( in other words, the board is full) there is a draw. Easy!

If, after the function checkWinner(); is called, the varible winner >0 – then something to end the game has happened – either a win or a draw. This is determined using the switch…case function at the end of checkWinner();. At this point a function relative to the game status is called, each of which display the outcome and wait for the user to press button A to start a new game. At the end of each of these functions, we call the function clearBoard(); – which resets the array board[] and winner back to zero, ready for the next battle of wits.

Now for our first example in action. The function machineMove() is an example of the simplest form of play – the machine randomly selects blank positions on the board until the game ends. In the following video clip you can see this in action:

For the forthcoming examples, we will allow the choice of who moves first. This is accomplished with the function moveFirst(); which sets the variable whofirst to 1 for human first, or 2 for machine first. This is read by playGame() to determine the first move. Now let’s inject some strategy into our machineMove(); function to give the machine a slight edge above sheer randomness.

In the following example, the machine will first only use the centre or corners until those positions have been taken. This is accomplished by placing the position numbers into another array strategy1[]={0,2,4,6,8} which the machine will randomly select from until those positions are used.  Once all those positions have been filled, the machine will revert to random positioning to attempt a win. You can download this example sketch from here. Do you think the machine can win if allowed to move first? Let’s see what happens in the following video clip:

In the second example the player who moves first will generally have the advantage. From this point, how could we strengthen the machine’s level of intelligence to improve its strategy? If you have a better method, and can integrate it into the example sketch, and are happy to publish it under Creative Commons – email the sketch to john at tronixstuff dot com.

So there you have it, some variations on a classic game translated for our Arduino systems. I hope you found it interesting… or at least something different to read about.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, education, games, LCD-09363, lesson, microcontrollers, tutorial4 Comments

Tutorial: Your Arduino’s inbuilt EEPROM

This is chapter thirty-one of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here 

[Updated 09/01/2013]

Today we are going to examine the internal EEPROM in our Arduino boards. What is an EEPROM some of you may be saying? An EEPROM is an Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory. It is a form of non-volatile memory that can remember things with the power being turned off, or after resetting the Arduino. The beauty of this kind of memory is that we can store data generated within a sketch on a more permanent basis.

Why would you use the internal EEPROM? For situations where data that is unique to a situation needs a more permanent home. For example, storing the unique serial number and manufacturing date of a commercial Arduino-based project – a function of the sketch could display the serial number on an LCD, or the data could be read by uploading a ‘service sketch’. Or you may need to count certain events and not allow the user to reset them – such as an odometer or operation cycle-counter.

What sort of data can be stored? Anything that can be represented as bytes of data. One byte of data is made up of eight bits of data. A bit can be either on (value 1) or off (value 0), and are perfect for representing numbers in binary form. In other words, a binary number can only uses zeros and ones to represent a value. Thus binary is also known as “base-2″, as it can only use two digits.

How can a binary number with only the use of two digits represent a larger number? It uses a lot of ones and zeros. Let’s examine a binary number, say 10101010. As this is a base-2 number, each digit represents 2 to the power of x, from x=0 onwards:

binary2 binary12

See how each digit of the binary number can represent a base-10 number. So the binary number above represents 85 in base-10 – the value 85 is the sum of the base-10 values. Another example – 11111111 in binary equals 255 in base 10.

binary2

Now each digit in that binary number uses one ‘bit’ of memory, and eight bits make a byte. Due to internal limitations of the microcontrollers in our Arduino boards, we can only store 8-bit numbers (one byte) in the EEPROM. This limits the decimal value of the number to fall between zero and 255. It is then up to you to decide how your data can be represented with that number range. Don’t let that put you off – numbers arranged in the correct way can represent almost anything!

There is one limitation to take heed of – the number of times we can read or write to the EEPROM. According to the manufacturer Atmel, the EEPROM is good for 100,000 read/write cycles (see the data sheet). One would suspect this to be a conservative estimate, however you should plan accordingly. *Update* After some experimentation, the life proved to be a lot longer

Now we know our bits and and bytes, how many bytes can be store in our Arduino’s microcontroller? The answer varies depending on the model of microcontroller. For example:

  • Boards with an Atmel ATmega328, such as Arduino Uno, Uno SMD, Lilypad or the Freetronics KitTen/Eleven – 1024 bytes (1 kilobyte)
  • Boards with an Atmel ATmega1280 or 2560, such as the Arduino Mega series – 4096 bytes (4 kilobytes)
  • Boards with an Atmel ATmega168, such as the original Arduino Lilypad, old Nano, Diecimila etc – 512 bytes.

If y0u are unsure have a look at the Arduino hardware index or ask your board supplier.

If you need more EEPROM storage than what is available with your microcontroller, consider using an external I2C EEPROM as described in the Arduino and I2C tutorial part two.

At this point we now understand what sort of data and how much can be stored in our Arduino’s EEPROM. Now it is time to put this into action. As discussed earlier, there is a finite amount of space for our data. In the following examples, we will use a typical Arduino board with the ATmega328 with 1024 bytes of EEPROM storage.

To use the EEPROM, a library is required, so use the following library in your sketches:

The rest is very simple. To store a piece of data, we use the following function:

The parameter a is the position in the EEPROM to store the integer (0~255) of data b. In this example, we have 1024 bytes of memory storage, so the value of a is between 0 and 1023. To retrieve a piece of data is equally as simple, use:

Where z is an integer to store the data from the EEPROM position a. Now to see an example.

This sketch will create random numbers between 0 and 255, store them in the EEPROM, then retrieve and display them on the serial monitor. The variable EEsize is the upper limit of your EEPROM size, so (for example) this would be 1024 for an Arduino Uno, or 4096 for a Mega.

The output from the serial monitor will appear as such:

So there you have it, another useful way to store data with our Arduino systems. Although not the most exciting tutorial, it is certainly a useful.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, education, EEPROM, lesson, microcontrollers, tutorial33 Comments

Moving Forward with Arduino – Chapter 30 – twitter

Learn how to tweet from your Arduino in chapter thirty of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe.

[Updated 26/7/2013]

In this article we will learn how to send messages from our Arduino to twitter. For the uninitiated who may be thinking “what is all this twitter nonsense about?”, twitter is a form of microblogging. You can create a message with a maximum length of 140 characters, and broadcast this on the twitter service. For people to receive your messages (or tweets) they also need to be a member of twitter and choose to subscribe to your tweets.

Generally people will use the twitter service using one of three methods: using a web browser on a personal computer or internet device, on a mobile phone, or using a specific application such as TweetDeck on one of the aforementioned devices. For example, here is a typical web browser view:

And here is an example of a twitter application running on an Android OS smartphone:

tweetdeck

So as you can see, it is easy enough to read peoples’ tweets. Therein lies the reason for this article – we can harness twitter as an output device for our Arduino systems. We can broadcast various messages, so systems can be created to monitor specific parameters and report on their status at regular intervals, upon an event occurring, and so on.

In some areas, you can set twitter to send tweets from a certain user to your mobile phone via SMS – however if doing so be careful to confirm possible charges to your mobile phone account. Finally, if you are worried about privacy with regards to your tweets, you can set your account to private and only allow certain people to follow your tweets.

So let’s get started. First of all – you will need a twitter account. If you do not have one, you can sign up for one here. If you already have a twitter account, you can always open more for other uses – such as an Arduino. For example, my twitter account is @tronixstuff, but my demonstration machine twitter account is @tronixstuff2. Then I have set my primary account to follow my machine’s twitter account. Once you have logged into twitter with your machine account, visit this page and get yourself a token by following the Step One link. Save your token somewhere safe, you’ll need to insert it into your Arduino sketch.

Next, you will need some hardware. Apart from your usual Arduino board, you will need an Ethernet shield. However to save space and money I’ll be using the Freetronics EtherTen:

If you are unfamiliar with using Arduino and Ethernet, please review chapter sixteen before continuing forward with this article. From a software perspective, we will need another library for our Arduino IDE. Download and install the twitter library from here. Now, at this point – please run the Webserver example described in chapter sixteen and ensure it is working before moving forward from this point. While you do that, we’ll have a break…

lopburi-0606

Now it is time to send our first tweet. The following sketch is a modification of the demonstration version, in which we have isolated the tweet-sending into a separate function called (strangely enough) tweet();. It is not complex at all:

So after uploading the above sketch, running a network cable from your access point to the Ethernet shield, and powering up the Arduino board – your tweet should appear as such:

Excellent – it works. And I hope yours did as well. If it did not, open the serial monitor box to get some feedback from the sketch. From experimentation the most amount of errors are caused by incorrect IP and trying to send multiple tweets too quickly. If you get excited and try to run the sketch again by hitting reset, twitter will reply back with an error – it does not allow duplicate tweets to be sent (over a short period of time). Twitter will reply to your tweet with a code which describes the result of your tweet. This code is stored in an integer variable using the function:

For example, 200 means the tweet was sent successfully, and 403 means you have attempted a duplicate tweet. However you can omit the code-checking if you are not fussed about your tweet’s status.

Although it was fun tweeting Hello world, let’s create an example that reacts to various events and tweets about them. To simulate some events I have connected four buttons to digital inputs (using the button board from chapter twelve). Pressing a button sends of the matching message. However you can use any form of digital output or decision-making in your sketch. For now, here is the example sketch:

And here is a screen shot of the results after pressing buttons one, four, two then three:

So there you have it, another useful way to send information from your Arduino to the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. Big thanks to @neocat for their work with the twitter  Arduino libraries.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, cellular, ethernet, learning electronics, microcontrollers, tutorial, twitter2 Comments

Tutorial: Arduino and TFT LCD

Old and now unsupported tutorial for 4D Systems 1.44″ TFT serial interface LCD.

Update 20/04/2013 

The Arduino library for this module hasn’t been updated to work with Arduino v1.0.1+ – so you need to use Arduino IDE v22 or v23. And the module itself has been discontinued. For the time being I’m leaving the tutorial here until a more suitable item can be used. We can’t help you with the 4D module

Nevertheless – if you have one – here’s the subject of the tutorial- the 4D Systems 1.44″ TFT serial interface LCD:

The LCD is an LED-backlit thin-film transistor type, resolution is 128 x 128 pixels, with an RGB colour range of 65536.

As an aside, this is a very powerful piece of hardware. The module not only contains a 1.44″ square TFT LCD, there is also a dedicated graphics processor and a microSD card interface. One can program the display processor in the same manner as another microcontroller platform for incredibly interesting results. For more information, please visit:

http://www.4dsystems.com.au/prod.php?id=120

However in the spirit of keeping things simple, this article will focus on driving the LCD directly using our Arduino or compatible boards. There are two firmware versions of this module – the GFX and the SGC. We need to have the SGC firmware, as this allows control via the serial TX/RX pins from our Arduno board. If you have purchased the SGC module, you’re ready to go. Scroll down until you see “And we’re back…”. However if you have the GFX version, please read the following instructions on how to change your LCD’s firmware from GFX to SGC…

Changing the firmware from GFX to SGC

  • At the moment this process only seems available to users of Microsoft Windows. All complaints to 4D Systems.
  • Unfortunately this process may not work with an Arduino Mega board.
  • First of all, remove the ATmega328 from your Arduino board. Please be careful, use a chip puller if possible. We are going to use the board as a simple serial-USB converter;
  • Insert your LCD module into a solderless breadboard;
  • Connect Arduino pin 0 (RX) to display pin 7 (RX); connect Arduino pin 1 (TX) to display pin 8 (TX). [Yes – TX>TX, RX>RX];
  • Connect Arduino 5V to display pin 9; connect Arduino GND to display pin 6; your LCD should display the following:

beforesgc

  • Visit http://www.4dsystems.com.au/prod.php?id=46, download and open the PmmC Loader application; visit http://www.4dsystems.com.au/prod.php?id=120 and download the .pmmc file to your local drive;
  • Connect your Arduino board via USB to the computer; then run the PmmC loader application;
  • Select the appropriate COM: port, load in the .pmmc file, then click Load. The firmware update should take less than sixty seconds;
  • When finished, you will be presented with the following on the computer:

progfinish

… and the following on your LCD:

aftersgcss

  • At this point unplug the USB lead from your Arduino board and all leads into the Arduino board;
  • Re-insert the ATmega328 back into your Arduino board;
  • Reconnect the wires from the LCD module to the Arduino, but this time connect Arduino TX to LCD RX; and LCD TX to Arduino RX.
  • Now you have  the serial-interface SGC firmware model LCD.

And we’re back…

To control this LCD, it requires commands to be sent via Serial.write(), and such commands are in the form of hexadecimal numbers. (You see something new every day). You can download the reference book with all the commands:

http://tronixstuff.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/goldelox-sgc-commands-sis-rev3.pdf

and bypass the library by directly writing the hexadecimal numbers directly to the module.

However, to get up to speed as fast as possible we can use a library with more of the popular functions included. Kudos and thanks to Oscar Gonzalez for writing a very useful library. Download the library from:

http://code.google.com/p/displayshield4d/downloads/list

and install into your ../Arduino-002x/libraries folder, then re-start the Arduino IDE if you had it running. You may be wondering why the library is named displayshield4d – the LCD manufacturer sells this LCD on an Arduino shield. Although that would be great for experimenting, one would need to purchase another standalone LCD if their project moved forward – myself included. So that’s why we’re using the bare LCD board.

To connect the LCD to our Arduino is very simple:

  • LCD pin 5 to Arduino RST;
  • LCD pin 6 to Arduino GND;
  • LCD pin 7 to Arduino D1;
  • LCD pin 8 to Arduino D0;
  • LCD pin 9 to Arduino 5V.

In the following examples we will demonstrate the various functions available in the library. As this is chapter 29, I will no longer explain the more basic functions or ideas that you should know by now, instead relying on comments within the sketch if it feels necessary. It can take a short moment for the LCD controller to process, so always put a short delay between functions.

When uploading a sketch to your Arduino you may need to disconnect the LCD from Arduino D0/D1 as it can interfere with the serial process.

Firstly we will demonstrate text display. Initialising the display requires a few functions:

The second line creates an instance of lcd to be used with the relevant functions. Next, within void setup():

To write text to the LCD, the following function is required:

This line sets the font transparency. If we use the parameter OLED_FONT_TRANSPARENT the unused pixels in the character area will be transparent and continue to show what they were set to before the text was over-written with. You can also use OLED_FONT_OPAQUE, which blocks the item displayed “behind” the text.

Whenever a function requires a colour parameter, we use:

where x, y and z are numerical values (between 0 and 255) for the red, green and blue components of the required colour. If you need an RGB numerical reference, download this handy chart. Finally, to display some text we use the following:

The parameters required are:

  • a – the x-position of the first character. E.g. if this was a zero, the top-left pixel of the first character would be on the left-most pixel column of the LCD;
  • b – the y-position of the first character. e.g. if both a and b were zero, the text would start from the top-left of the LCD;
  • c – numerical code for the font to use: 1 is for 5×7 pixel characters, 2 for 8×8 and 3 for 8×12;
  • the three values within the lcd.RGB() function determine the colour of the text;
  • d – x-axis resolution multiplier. E.g. if you double this and use the 5×7 font, the characters will be double-width;
  • e – y-axis resolution multiplier.

Now let’s see this in action with the following sketch:

And a short video clip of the example in action: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3yypXL022w

As you can see the display update speed is much better than the LCD from the previous chapter. Although this example was short, don’t be afraid to try out your own parameters in the example sketch.

Next we will demonstrate the various graphics functions in the library. Creating graphics isn’t rocket science, it just takes some imagination (something I admit to lacking) and following the parameters for each function. Our first is

which places a pixel on the screen at location x,y of colour described using lcd.RGB(). Next we have

which draws a line from x1, y1 to x2, y2 of colour rgb. One can also create rectangles and so on using

This will create a rectangle with the top-left point at x,y; width is l pixels, height is h pixels, and a new parameter z. If z is 0, the function will draw a solid shape, if z is 1, it will display only a wire-frame rectangle with a pixel width of one. Circles are created using

where x and y are the coordinates for the centre of the circle, r is the radius, and z is the solid/wireframe parameter. And finally – triangles:

This will draw a triangle with the corners at the coordinate parameters; z again is the solid/wireframe parameter. However you need to order the corners in an anti-clockwise order. This will become evident in the example sketch below. In this example we run through the graphical functions described above. By following through the sketch you should gain an idea of how the graphical functions are used, in order to create your own displays.

And here is the video of example 29.2 in action … brought to you by Mr Blurrycam: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKy-GuKWGZ8

 

Posted in 4d systems, arduino, education, LCD, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, TFT, tutorial

Tutorial: Arduino and Colour LCD

Learn how to use the colour LCD shield from Sparkfun in chapter twenty-eight of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 19/02/2013

Although there are many colour LCDs on the market, I’ve chosen a relatively simple and popular model to examine in this tutorial – the Sparkfun Color LCD shield:

If you buy one note (shown above) that stacking headers aren’t supplied or fitted to the shield. If you get a header pack from Sparkfun or elsewhere – order PRT-10007 not PRT-11417 as the LCD shield doesn’t have the extra holes for R3 Arduino boards. However if you do have an Arduino R3 – relax … the shield works. While we’re on the subject of pins – this shield uses D3~D5 for the three buttons, and D8, 9, 11 and 13 for the LCD interface. The shield takes 5V and doesn’t require any external power for the backlight. The LCD unit is 128 x 128 pixels, with nine defined colours (red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink) as well as black and white.

So let’s get started. From a software perspective, the first thing to do is download and install the library for the LCD shield. Visit the library page here. Then download the .zip file, extract and copy the resulting folder into your ..\arduino-1.0.x\libraries folder. Then restart the Arduino IDE if it was already open.

At this point let’s check the shield is working before moving forward. Fit it to your Arduino – making sure the shield doesn’t make contact with the USB socket**. Then open the Arduino IDE and upload the TestPattern sketch found in the Examples folder. You should be presented with a nice test pattern as such:

It’s difficult to photograph the LCD – (some of them have very bright backlights), so the image may not be a true reflection of reality. Nevertheless this shield is easy to use and we will prove this in the following examples.

At the start of every sketch, you will need the following lines:

as well as the following in void setup():

With regards to lcd.init(), try it first without a parameter. If the screen doesn’t work, try PHILIPS or EPSON instead. There are two versions of the LCD shield floating about each with a different controller chip. The contrast parameter is subjective, however 63 looks good – but test for yourself. Now let’s move on to examine each function with a small example, then use the LCD shield in more complex applications.

The LCD can display 8 rows of 16 characters of text. The function to display text is:

where x and y are the coordinates of the top left pixel of the first character in the string. Another necessary function is:

Which clears the screen and sets the background colour to the parameter colour.  Please note – when referring to the X- and Y-axis in this article, they are relative to the LCD in the position shown below. Now for an example – to recreate the following display:

… use the following sketch:

In example 28.1 we used the function lcd.clear(), which unsurprisingly cleared the screen and set the background a certain colour. Let’s have a look at the various background colours in the following example. The lcd.clear()  function is helpful as it can set the entire screen area to a particular colour. As mentioned earlier, there are the predefined colours red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink, as well as black and white. Here they are in the following example:

And now to see it in action. The colours are more livid in real life, unfortunately the camera does not capture them so well.

Now that we have had some experience with the LCD library’s functions, we can move on to drawing some graphical objects. Recall that the screen has a resolution of 128 by 128 pixels. We have four functions to make use of this LCD real estate, so let’s see how they work. The first is:

This functions places a pixel (one LCD dot) at location x, y with the colour of colour.

Note – in this (and all the functions that have a colour parameter) you can substitute the colour (e.g. BLACK) for a 12-bit RGB value representing the colour required. 

Next is:

Which draws a line of colour COLOUR, from position x0, y0 to x1, y1. Our next function is:

This function draws an oblong or square of colour COLOUR with the top-left point at x0, y0 and the bottom right at x1, y1. Fill is set to 0 for an outline, and 1 for a filled oblong. It would be convenient for drawing bar graphs for data representation. And finally, we can also create circles, using:

X and Y is the location for the centre of the circle, radius and COLOUR are self-explanatory. We will now use these graphical functions in the following demonstration sketch:

You can see Example 28.3  in the following video. (There’s a section in  the video showing semi-circles – however this isn’t possible with the new Arduino v1+ library).  For photographic reasons, I will stick with white on black for the colours.

So now you have an explanation of the functions to drive the screen – and only your imagination is holding you back.  ** Get an Eleven board – it has a microUSB socket so you don’t run the risk of rubbing against shields. For another example of the colour LCD shield in use, check out my version of “Tic-tac-toe“.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, education, LCD, LCD-09363, lesson, microcontrollers, tutorial3 Comments

Project – Simple RFID access system

In this tutorial you can make an RFID access system. It’s very simple and can be used with a wide variety of end-uses.

Updated 18/03/2013

The purpose of this project is to prototype a basic RFID access system. Although it is not that complicated, this article is my response to a kit reviewed in the Australian “Silicon Chip” (November 2010) electronics magazine. Their article describes the kit in detail – operation, schematic, use and installation. However the code for the microcontroller (PIC16F628A)  is not published due to the kit manufacturer holding copyright over the design.

This is a shame, as many organisations have been quite successful selling open-source kits. So instead of moaning about it, I have created my own design that matches the operation of the original, instead using the ATmega328 MCU with Arduino bootloader. Consider this a basic framework that you can modify for your own access system, or the start of something more involved.

articless

There are pros and cons with the original vs. my version. The biggest pro is that you can buy the whole kit for around Au$40 including a nice PCB, solder it together, and it works. However if you want to do it yourself, you can modify it to no end, and have some fun learning and experimenting along the way. So let’s go!

The feature requirements are few. The system must be able to learn and remember up to eight RFID access tags/cards, etc – which must be able to be altered by a non-technical user. Upon reading a card, the system will activate a relay for a period of time (say 1 second) to allow operation of a door strike or electric lock. Finally, the RFID tag serial numbers are to be stored in an EEPROM in case of a power outage. When a tag is read, a matching LED (1~8) will show which tag was read. There are also two LEDs, called “Go” and “Stop” which show the activation status. The original kit has some more LEDs, which I have made superfluous by blinking existing LEDs.

This is a simple thing to make, and the transition from a solderless breadboard to strip board will be easy for those who decide to make a permanent example. But for now, you can follow with the prototype. First is the parts list:

  • Atmel ATmega328 with Arduino bootloader;
  • 16 MHz resonator (X1 in schematic);
  • ten LEDs of your choice;
  • two normally-open push buttons;
  • two 560 ohm resistors (all resistors 1/4 watt);
  • one 1k ohm resistor;
  • three 10k ohm resistors;
  • one BC548 transistor;
  • three 0.01 uF monolithic capacitors;
  • one 100 uF electrolytic capacitor;
  • one 1N4004 diode;
  • Microchip 24LC256 EEPROM;
  • 125 kHZ RFID module;
  • 125 kHz RFID tags/cards;
  • connecting wire;
  • large solderless breadboard;
  • LM7805 power regulator;
  • relay of your choice with 5V coil (example).

When selecting a relay, make sure it can handle the required load current and voltage – and that the coil current is less than 100mA.

If attempting to switch mains voltage/current – contact a licensed electrician. Your life is worth more than the money saved by not consulting an expert.

And here is the schematic (large version):

simplerfidschematic

Here is the prototype on the solderless breadboard. For demonstration purposes an LED has been substituted for the transistor/relay section of the circuit, the power regulator circuitry has not been shown, and there are superfluous 4.7k resistors on the I2C bus. To program the software (Arduino sketch) the easiest way is by inserting the target IC into an Arduino-compatible board, or via a 5V FTDI cable and a basic circuit as described here.

rfidbboardss

The Arduino sketch is also quite simple. The main loop calls the procedure readTags() to process any RFID tag read attempts, and then monitors button A – if pressed, the function learnTags() is called to allow memorisation of new RFID tags. Each tag serial number consists of 14 decimal numbers, and these are stored in the EEPROM sequentially. That is, the first tag’s serial number occupies memory positions 0~13, the second tag’s serial number occupies memory position 14~28, and so on. Two functions are used to read and write tag serial numbers to the EEPROM – readEEPROMtag() and writeEEPROMtag().

The EEPROM is controlled via the I2C bus. For a tutorial about Arduino, I2C bus and the EEPROM please read this article. For a tutorial about Arduino and RFID, please read this article. The rest of the sketch is pretty self-explanatory. Just follow it along and you can see how it works. You can download the sketch from hereAnd finally, a quick video demonstration:

So there you have it. I hope you enjoyed reading about this small project and perhaps gained some use for it of your own or sparked some other ideas in your imagination that you can turn into reality.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in hardware hacking, learning electronics, microcontrollers, projects, RDM630, RDM6300, rfid12 Comments

Tutorial: Arduino and GSM Cellular – Part Two

Continue to learn about connecting your Arduino to the cellular network with the SM5100 GSM module shield. This is chapter twenty-seven of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 02/03/2013

Assumed understanding for this article is found in part one. If you have not already done so, please read and understand it. In this instalment we continue with bare projects which you can use as a framework for your own creations.

Reach out and control something

First we will discuss how to make something happen by a simple telephone call. And the best thing is that we don’t need the the GSM module to answer the telephone call (thereby saving money) – just let the module ring a few times. How is this possible? Very easily. Recall example 26.1 – we monitored the activity of the GSM module by using our terminal software. In this case what we need to do is have our Arduino examine the text coming in from the serial output of the GSM module, and look for a particular string of characters.

When we telephone the GSM module from another number, the module returns the text as shown in the image below:

term2

We want to look for the text “RING”, as (obviously) this means that the GSM shield has recognised the ring signal from the exchange. Therefore need our Arduino to count the number of rings for the particular telephone call being made to the module. (Memories – Many years ago we would use public telephones to send messages to each other. For example, after arriving at a foreign destination we would call home and let the phone ring five times then hang up – which meant we had arrived safely). Finally, once the GSM shield has received a set number of rings, we want the Arduino to do something.

From a software perspective, we need to examine each character as it is returned from the GSM shield. Once an “R” is received, we examine the next character. If it is an “I”, we examine the next character. If it is an “N”, we examine the next character. If it is a “G”, we know an inbound call is being attempted, and one ring has occurred. We can set the number of rings to wait until out desired function is called. In the following example, when the shield is called, it will call the function doSomething() after three rings.

The function doSomething() controls two LEDs, one red, one green. Every time the GSM module is called for 3 rings, the Arduino alternately turns on or off the LEDs. Using this sketch as an example, you now have the ability to turn basically anything on or off, or call your own particular function. Another example would be to return some type of data, for example you could dial in and have the Arduino send you a text message containing temperature data.

And now for a quick video demonstration. The first call is made, and the LEDs go from red (off) to green (on). A second call is made, and the LEDs go from green (on) to red (off). Although this may seem like an over-simplified example, with your existing Ardiuno knowledge you now have the ability to run any function by calling your GSM shield.

Control Digital I/O via SMS

Now although turning one thing on or off is convenient, how can we send more control information to our GSM module? For example, control four or more digital outputs at once? These sorts of commands can be achieved by the reception and analysis of text messages.

Doing so is similar to the method we used in example 27.1. Once again, we will analyse the characters being sent from the GSM module via its serial out. However, there are two AT commands we need to send to the GSM module before we can receive SMSs, and one afterwards. The first one you already know:

Which sets the SMS mode to text. The second command is:

This command tells the GSM module to immediately send any new SMS data to the serial out. An example of this is shown in the terminal capture below:

smsrxdemo

Two text messages have been received since the module was turned on. You can see how the data is laid out. The blacked out number is the sender of the SMS. The number +61418706700 is the number for my carrier’s SMSC (short message service centre). Then we have the date and time. The next line is the contents of the text message – what we need to examine in our sketch.

The second text message in the example above is how we will structure our control SMS. Our sketch will wait for a # to come from the serial line, then consider the values after a, b, c and d – 0 for off, 1 for on. Finally, we need to send one more command to the GSM module after we have interpreted our SMS:

This deletes all the text messages from the SIM card. As there is a finite amount of storage space on the SIM, it is prudent to delete the incoming message after we have followed the instructions within. But now for our example. We will control four digital outputs, D9~12. For the sake of the exercise we are controlling an LED on each digital output, however you could do anything you like. Although the sketch may seem long and complex, it is not – just follow it through and you will see what is happening:

And now for a video demonstration:

So there you have it – controlling your Arduino digital outputs via a normal telephone or SMS. Now it is up to you and your imagination to find something to control, sensor data to return, or get up to other shenanigans.

If you enjoyed this article, you may find this of interest – controlling AC power outlets via SMS.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, CEL-00675, CEL-09607, cellphone hacking, cellular, GSM, hardware hacking, lesson, microcontrollers, SM5100, SMS, tutorial

Kit Review – MDC Bare-bones Board Kit (Arduino-compatible)

Hello readers

Today we continue to examine Arduino-compatible products by assembling an interesting kit from Modern Device Company – their “Bare Bones Board” (to be referred to as BBB). The BBB kit is an inexpensive way to take advantage of the Arduino Duemilanove-compatible platform, and also fills some gaps in the marketplace. Unlike the usual Arduino and compatible boards, the BBB does not maintain the recognisable form factor – that is, you cannot use the variety of Arduino shields. However, the BBB does have all the input and output connections, just in different positions.

So why would you use this kit? If you are looking to create a more permanent Arduino-based project that did not require a shield, and you are in a hurry – the BBB could be easily integrated into your design. Money is saved by not having the usual USB connection, so uploading your sketch is achieved using a 5V FTDI cable or using another Arduino board as the programmer.

Furthermore, the PCB is designed in a way that allows you to plug the BBB into the side of a solderless breadboard, which allows prototyping more complex Arduino-based circuits very easy. But more about that later. For now, let’s have a look at construction. An excellent set of instructions and a guide to use is available for download here.

In the spirit of saving money, the kit arrives in a plastic bag of sorts:

packagingss1

And upon emptying the contents, the following parts are introduced:

partsss2

Regular readers would know that the inclusion of an IC socket makes me very happy. The PCB is thicker than average and has a great silk-screen which makes following instructions almost unnecessary. One of the benefits of this kit is the ability to connect as little or as many I/O or programming pins as required.

And for the pins A0~A5, 5V, GND and AREF you are provided with header pins and a socket, allowing you to choose. Or you could just solder directly into the board. These pins are available on the bottom-left of the PCB. However there was one tiny surprise included with the parts:

rawinductor

This is a 15uH SMD inductor, used to reduce noise on the analog/digital section. According to the instructions, this was originally required with Arduino-style boards that used the ATmega168 microcontroller – however the BBB now includes the current ATmega328 which does not require the inductor. However, it is good to get some SMD practice, so I soldered it in first:

solder1ss1

Well it works, so that was a success. Soldering the rest of the main components was quite simple, thanks to the markings on the PCB. The key is to start with the lowest-profile (height) components (such as that pesky inductor) and work your way up to the largest. For example:

solder2ss1

As you can see from the PCB close-up above, you can have control over many attributes of your board. Please note that the revision-E kit does include the ATmega328 microcontroller, not the older ‘168. For more permanent installations, you can solder directly into I/O pins, the power supply and so on.

Speaking of power, the included power regulator IC for use with the DC input has quite a low current rating – 250 mA (below left). For my use, this board will see duty in a breadboard, and also a 5V supply for the rest of the circuit, so more current will be required. Thankfully the PCB has the space and pin spacing for a 7805 5V 1A regulator (below right), so I installed my own 7805 instead:

regulators

Finally, to make my Arduino-breadboarding life easier I installed the sockets for the analogue I/O, the DC socket and a row of header pins for the digital I/O. Below is my finished example connected into a breadboard blinking some LEDs:

finishedonbbss

In this example, the board is being powered from the 5V that comes along the FTDI cable. If doing so yourself, don’t forget that there is a maximum of 500 mA available from a USB port. If you need more current (and have installed the 7805 voltage regulator) make use of the DC socket, and set the PCB power select jumper to EXT. For a better look at the kit in action, here is a short video clip:

As you can see from the various angles shown in the video, there are many points on the PCB to which you can use for power, ground, I/O connection and so on. As illustrated at the beginning of this article, a variety of header pins are included with the kit. And please note that the LED on the board is not wired into D13 as other Arduino-type boards have been… the BBB’s LED is just an “on” indicator.

However if you are using this type of kit, you most likely will not need to blink a solitary LED. However some people do use the D13 LED for trouble-shooting, so perhaps you will need it after all. Each to their own!

In conclusion, the BBB is another successful method of prototyping with the Arduino system. The kit was of a good quality, included everything required to get working the first time, and is quite inexpensive if you have a 5V FTDI cable or an Arduino Duemilanove/Uno or compatible board for sketch uploading.

Once again, thank you for reading this kit review, and I look forward to your comments and so on. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, and if you have any questions – why not join our Google Group? It’s free and we’re all there to learn and help each other.

High resolution photos are available on flickr.

[Note – this kit was purchased by myself personally and reviewed without notifying the manufacturer or retailer]

Posted in arduino, bare bones board, kit review, learning electronics, microcontrollers, modern devices4 Comments

Tutorial: Using analog input for multiple buttons

Use multiple buttons with one analog input in chapter twenty-five of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe.

[Updated 14/03/2013]

The purpose of this article is demonstrate how you can read many push buttons (used for user-input) using only one analog input pin. This will allow you to save digital I/O pins for other uses such as LCD modules and so on. Hopefully you recall how we used analogRead() in chapter one, and how we used a potentiometer to control menu options in exercise 10.1. For this article, we will be looking at reading individual presses, not simultaneous (i.e. detecting multiple button presses).

To recap, an analog input pin is connected to an analog to digital (ADC) converter in our Arduino’s microcontroller. It has a ten bit resolution, and can return a numerical value between 0 and 1023 which relates to an analog voltage being read of between 0 and 5 volts DC. With the following sketch:

and in the following short video, we have demonstrated the possible values returned by measuring the voltage from the centre pin of a 10k ohm potentiometer, which is connected between 5V and GND:

As the potentiometer’s resistance decreases, the value returned by analogRead() increases. Therefore at certain resistance values, analogRead() will return certain numerical values. So, if we created a circuit with (for example) five buttons that allowed various voltages to be read by an analog pin, each voltage read would cause analogRead() to return a particular value. And thus we can read the status of a number of buttons using one analog pin. The following circuit is an example of using five buttons on one analog input, using the sketch from example 25.1:

example25p2

And here it is in action:

Where is the current coming from? Using pinMode(A5, INPUT_PULLUP); turns on the internal pull-up resistor in the microcontroller, which gives us ~4.8V to use. Some of you may have notice that when the right-most button is pressed, there is a direct short between A5 and GND. When that button is depressed, the current flow is less than one milliamp due to the pull-up resistor protecting us from a short circuit. Also note that you don’t have to use A5, any analog pin is fine.

As shown in the previous video clip, the values returned by analogRead() were:

  • 1023 for nothing pressed (default state)
  • 454 for button one
  • 382 for button two
  • 291 for button three
  • 168 for button four
  • 0 for button five

So for our sketches to react to the various button presses, they need to make decisions based on the value returned by analogRead(). Keeping all the resistors at the same value gives us a pretty fair spread between values, however the values can change slightly due to the tolerance of resistors and parasitic resistance in the circuit.

So after making a prototype circuit, you should determine the values for each button, and then have your sketch look at a range of values when reading the analog pin. Doing so becomes more important if you are producing more than one of your project, as resistors of the same value from the same batch can still vary slightly. Using the circuit from example 25.2, we will use a function to read the buttons and return the button number for the sketch to act upon:

And now our video demonstration:

So now you have a useful method for receiving input via buttons without wasting many digital input pins. I hope you found this article useful or at least interesting.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in analog, arduino, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, multiple buttons, tutorial9 Comments

Initial review: mbed LPC1768 Development Board

In this article we review the mbed NXP LPC1768 development board and the mbed system in general.

Introduction

Today we will examine the mbed NXP LPC1768 development board. The goal of the mbed system is to “provide(s) a platform for microcontroller hardware, tools, libraries and resources designed to enable rapid prototyping with microcontrollers.” (http://mbed.org/handbook/About). Personally I also see this as a good option for a “next step” for those who have outgrown their Arduino – the mbed offers much more processing power, a similar development environment and similar hardware ease of use. A great way to move from 8-bit to 32-bit power…

The NXP LCP1768 MCU on our mbed board offers the following specifications:

  • a Cortex-M3 core running at 96MHz
  • 512kb flash memory and 64kb RAM
  • powered via USB or 4.5~9V DC applied straight to the board
  • Real time clock (requires external battery backup if necessary)
  • Loads of I/O options, including:
  • USB serial
  • I2C
  • Ethernet on board
  • SPI
  • serial I/O
  • Control-area network (CAN) bus
  • 3.3v digital logic, 40mA per digital pin with a total maximum of 400 mA
  • analog and digital I/O pins

For a full description and data sheet, please visit: http://mbed.org/handbook/mbed-NXP-LPC1768.

Although a small project started by two ARM employees, the mbed has proven to be a worthy product to allow people of generally all skill levels access to powerful microcontrollers without a lot of the inherent complications. It does this in two ways:

Firstly, the hardware is very simple and designed for ease of use. The LPC1768 is mounted on a small board to convert it to a DIP format, making breadboard easy. The designers have also thought to include four blue LEDs for digital output and a nice large reset button. Interface with the PC is via USB. The mbed appears as a USB flash drive to your computer’s operating system, and compiled programs are downloaded as a single .bin file into the mbed.

Secondly, the development environment. Unlike other MCU products on the market, mbed is a completely online development environment. That is, in a manner very similar to cloud computing services such as Google Docs or Zoho Office. However there are some pros and cons of this method. The pros include not having to install any software on the PC – as long as you have a web browser and a USB port you should be fine; any new libraries or IDE updates are handled on the server leaving you to not worry about staying up to date; and the online environment can monitor and update your MCU firmware if necessary. However the cons are that you cannot work with your code off-line, and there may be some possible privacy issues. We will examine the online environment later on.

Preparing and using the mbed is incredibly simple. The designers have certainly exceeded their goal of providing a rapid prototyping environment. The process from opening the box to running your first program is (as always) quite simple.

The initial packaging is clear and inviting, and includes a getting started document, USB cable, a laminated hardware pinout card (very useful) and a bumper sticker (!):

1

 

The mbed unit itself is compact yet not too small:

2

The underside contains the USB interface and flash drive controllers:

3

The initial setup requires registration with the mbed online environment. This is done by plugging in your mbed to the USB, and visiting the web page URL stored in the mbed’s flash drive:

4

This will take you to the login page where you can create a new user profile:

5

The serial number of the mbed is recognised and linked to your user account. This means you do need to own an mbed to explore the depths of the online services available, and also serves to keep the mbed online ecosystem free of spammers and whatnot. After registration, you will be presented with the “getting started” page, which contains links to the function references, tutorials, FAQs, user forums, user-contributed content and more. All is revealed by exploring the links from this page.

After signing up, you can create a profile page which is public. This also contains tabs that contain notes, published (programs you make public) and libraries (that you have made public) Initially I thought the profile page would be private, or limited to other mbed owners, but this is not the case. From this page you can create notebook files, view your past activity and display published programs and libraries.

For example, I created a test notebook page and someone left a comment on it twenty minutes later. So be careful if you have some secrets – instead, you could cut and paste work to and from the IDE. However if you accidentally publish something it can be deleted, but remember that the internet is written in ink, not pencil.

However don’t let privacy worries put you off – just be careful not to write anything or publish programs you want to keep secret. Furthermore, as said earlier –  having an online IDE has a few advantages – you don’t need to install anything on your PC apart from an up to date web browser. This means you can work on programs from other computers with ease. Bored at work? Using a locked-down hotel or  school computer? You can still work on your mbed programs!

The openness of the mbed environment does create a positive, helpful environment similar to that found in the open-source community – there are many libraries that have been submitted that allow connection to various pieces of hardware such as LCD screens, bluetooth, Wii controllers, motors, servos, sensors and so on – as well as libraries for pachube, twitter, HTTP client and server access, and much more. These are found in the environment’s “Cookbook” section. If something interesting is on the market, there may very well be an mbed library to work with it.

The IDE is quite clear and straightforward. The program editor maintains colour-context, line numbering, support auto-formatting, and you can import or export code using the standard copy and paste keyboard shortcuts.

6

You can have multiple folders open at once, where each folder contains one program, the standard mbed function library and others you may have imported. Furthermore, there is also a very clear function reference for the standard mbed library available within the IDE – very useful. Programs are written in C++, and the online IDE takes care of everything – leaving you with only the .bin file to upload to the mbed. If you are new to programming or a little rusty with C++, books with unfortunate titles such as “C++ for Dummies” may prove useful.

7

You can also import libraries published by other mbed users into your own projects. Details of these published libraries (and programs) are listed in the mbed online environment. The speed of development is demonstrated very well in this video from the mbed team:

The support options are very good, including a members-only forum, loads of information, the Cookbook, a wiki for publishing user-contributed libraries and resources, and other FAQs and so on. If you have a question I am sure it could be answered very quickly.  When it comes time to compile and run your program, after a successful compile your computer will download a single .bin file, which is then copied over to your mbed. Then by pressing the reset button on the mbed, the program is stored into the MCU and executed. You can store more than one .bin file on the mbed, however the latest file (by time stamp) is only executed.

Overall the mbed is a refreshingly-easy point of entry to microcontrollers. The ability to quickly prototype an idea into reality is really not difficult, and those with some C++ experience (or willing to learn) will make use of the mbed environment in no time at all. And if you decide to move your prototype into production, details and schematics are provided to help implement the nxp LPC1768 into your designs. Frankly, for fast prototyping at work, or just fun for anyone interested in electronics, the mbed offers a simple yet powerful way of getting things done.

The mbed board used in this review was a promotional consideration from RS. You can purchase an mbed directly from your local RS distributor.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in learning electronics, lesson, LPC1768, mbed, microcontrollers, product review, review, tronixstuff, tutorial10 Comments

Tutorial: Arduino and monochrome LCDs

Please note that the tutorials are not currently compatible with Arduino IDE v1.0. Please continue to use v22 or v23 until further notice. 

This is chapter twenty-four of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe.

The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Welcome back fellow arduidans!

The purpose of this article is to summarise a range of affordable monochrome liquid-crystal display units that are available to work with our Arduino; and to replace the section about LCDs in chapter two of this series. We will first examine some fixed-character and then graphical LCD units in this article. So let’s go!

Fixed-character LCD modules

When shopping around for LCD modules, these will usually be the the most common found in retail outlets. Their size is normally measured by the number of columns and rows of characters in the display. For example, the three LCDs below are 8×2, 16×2 and 20×4 characters in size:

lcdtypesss

Currently, most LCDs should have a backlight of some sort, however you may come across some heavily-discounted models on (for example) eBay that are not. Character, background and backlight colours can vary, for example:

backlitsss

Interfacing these screens with our Arduino boards is very easy, and there are several ways to do so. These interface types can include four- and eight-bit parallel, three-wire,  serial, I2C and SPI interfaces; and the LCD price is usually inversely proportional to the ease of interface (that is, parallel are usually the cheapest).

Four-bit parallel interface

This is the cheapest method of interface, and our first example for this article. Your LCD will need a certain type of controller IC called a Hitachi HD44780 or compatible such as the KS0066. From a hardware perspective, there are sixteen pins on the LCD. These are usually in one row:

16pinsss

… or two rows of eight:

2by8pinsss

The pin labels for our example are the following:

  1. GND
  2. 5V (careful! Some LCDs use 3.3 volts – adjust according to LCD data sheet from supplier)
  3. Contrast
  4. RS
  5. RW
  6. Enable
  7. DB0 (pins DB0~DB7 are the data lines)
  8. DB1
  9. DB2
  10. DB3
  11. DB4
  12. DB5
  13. DB6
  14. DB7
  15. backlight + (unused on non-backlit LCDs) – again, check your LCD data sheet as backlight voltages can vary.
  16. backlight GND (unused on non-backlit LCDs)

As always, check your LCD’s data sheet before wiring it up.

Some LCDs may also have the pinout details on their PCB if you are lucky, however it can be hard to decipher:

Now let’s connect our example 16×2 screen to our Arduino using the following diagram.

Our LCD runs from 5V and also has a 5V backlight – yours may differ, so check the datasheet:

4bitparallel2

(Circuit layout created using Fritzing)

Notice how we have used six digital output pins on the Arduino, plus ground and 5V. The 10k ohm potentiometer connected between LCD pins 2, 3 and 5 is used to adjust the display contrast. You can use any digital out pins on your Arduino, just remember to take note of which ones are connected to the LCD as you will need to alter a function in your sketch. If your backlight is 3.3V, you can use the 3.3V pin on the Arduino.

From a software perspective, we need to use the LiquidCrystal() library. This library should be pre-installed with the Arduino IDE. So in the start of your sketch, add the following line:

Next, you need to create a variable for our LCD module, and tell the sketch which pins are connected to which digital output pins. This is done with the following function:

The parameters in the brackets define which digital output pins connect to (in order) LCD pins: RS, enable, D4, D5, D6, and D7.

Finally, in your void setup(), add the line:

This tells the sketch the dimensions in characters (columns, rows) of our LCD module defined as the variable lcd. In the following example we will get started with out LCD by using the basic setup and functions. To save space the explanation of each function will be in the sketch itself. Please note that you do not have to use an Arduino Mega – it is used in this article as my usual Arduino boards are occupied elsewhere.

And here is a quick video of the example 24.1 sketch in action:

There are also a some special effects that we can take advantage of with out display units – in that we can actually define our own characters (up to eight per sketch). That is, control the individual dots (or pixels) that make up each character. With the our character displays, each character is made up of five columns of eight rows of pixels, as illustrated in the close-up below:

pixels

In order to create our characters, we need to define which pixels are on and which are off. This is easily done with the use of an array (array? see chapter four). For example, to create a solid block character as shown in the image above, our array would look like:

Notice how we have eight elements, each representing a row (from top to bottom), and each element has five bits – representing the pixel column for each row. The next step is to reference the custom character’s array to a reference number (0~7) using the following function within void setup():

Now when you want to display the custom character, use the following function:

where 0 is the memory position of the character to display.

To help make things easier, there is a small website that does the array element creation for you. Now let’s display a couple of custom characters to get a feel for how they work. In the following sketch there are three defined characters: