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Review – Freetronics 128×128 Pixel Colour OLED Module

Introduction

Time for another review, and in this instalment we have the new 128×128 Pixel OLED Module from Freetronics. It’s been a while since we’ve had a full-colour graphic display to experiment with, and this one doesn’t disappoint. Unlike other displays such as LCD, this one uses OLED – “Organic Light-Emitting Diode” technology.

OLEDs allow for a faster refresh rate, and to the naked eye has a great amount of colour contrast. Furthermore the viewing angles are excellent, you can clearly read the display from almost any angle, for example:

freetronics OLED display bottom view

freetronics OLED display side

However they can suffer from burn-in from extended display of the same thing so that does need to be taken into account. Nevertheless they provide an inexpensive and easy-to-use method of displaying colour text, graphics and even video from a variety of development boards. Finally – there is also a microSD socket for data logging, image storage or other uses. However back to the review unit. It arrives in typical retail packaging:

freetronics OLED display

and includes the OLED display itself, a nifty reusable parts tray/storage box, and two buttons. The display has a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels and has a square display area with a diagonal size of 38.1 mm. The unit itself is quite compact:

freetronics OLED display front

freetronics_OLED_display_rear

The display is easily mounted using the holes on the left and right-hand side of the display. The designers have also allowed space for an LED, current-limiting resistor and button on each side, for user input or gaming – perfect for the  included buttons. However this section of the PCB is also scored-off so you can remove them if required. Using the OLED isn’t difficult, and tutorials have been provided for both Arduino and Raspberry Pi users.

Using with Arduino

After installing the Arduino library, it’s a simple matter of running some jumper wires from the Arduino or compatible board to the display – explained in detail with the “Quickstart” guide. Normally I would would explain how to use the display myself, however in this instance a full guide has been published which explains how to display text of various colours, graphics, displaying images stored on a microSD card and more. Finally there’s some interesting demonstration sketches included with the library. For example, displaying large amounts of text:

… the variety of fonts available:

freetronics OLED font demonstration

… and for those interested in monitoring changing data types, a very neat ECG-style of sketch:

… and the mandatory rotating cube from a Freetronics forum member:

Using with Raspberry Pi

For users of this popular single-board computer, there’s a great tutorial and some example videos available on the Freetronics website for your consideration, such as the following video clip playback:

Support

Along with the Arduino and Raspberry Pi tutorials, there’s also the Freetronics support forum where members have been experimenting with accelerated drivers, demonstrations and more.

Competition!

For a chance to win your own OLED display, send a postcard with your email address clearly printed on the back to:

OLED Competition, PO Box 5435 Clayton 3168 Australia. 

Cards must be received by 24/10/2013. One card will then be selected at random and the winner will be sent one Freetronics OLED Display. Prize will be delivered by Australia Post standard air mail. We’re not responsible for customs or import duties, VAT, GST, import duty, postage delays, non-delivery or whatever walls your country puts up against receiving inbound mail.

Conclusion

Compared to previous colour LCD units used in the past, OLED technology is a great improvement – and demonstrated very well with this unit. Furthermore you get the whole package – anyone call sell you a display, however Freetronics also have the support, tutorials, drivers and backup missing from other retailers. So if you need a colour display, check it out.

And for more detail, full-sized images from this article can be found on flickr. And if you’re interested in learning more about Arduino, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

[Note – OLED display was a promotional consideration from Freetronics]

Posted in arduino, freetronics, LCD, OLED, product review, raspberry pi, review, tutorial0 Comments

Arduino and TM1638 LED Display Modules

Introduction

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the use of some interesting LED display modules I discovered on the dealextreme website, for example:

They contain eight 7-segment red LED digits, eight red/green LEDs and also eight buttons for user input. You can get red or green display models. The units can also be daisy-chained, allowing up to five at once, and a short cable is included with each module, as well as some short spacers and bolts, such as:

The spaces are just long enough to raise the PCB above a surface, however to mount the boards anywhere useful you would need longer ones. You may also want to remove the IDC sockets if you want to mount the module close to the surface of a panel. This would be a simple desoldering task as they are through-hole sockets:

The board is controlled by a TM1638 IC:

This part seems to be a domestic Chinese product from “Titan Micro Electronics“. After a quick search the TM1638 isn’t available from Digikey, Mouser or the element14 group… so if anyone has a lead on a low-volume, reliable supplier for these – please leave a comment below. However here is a link to the data sheet – thanks Marc!.

Getting Started

Now to make things happen…

Hardware – Connection to an Arduino-compatible board (or other MCU) is quite simple. The pinouts are shown on the rear of the PCB, and match the fitting on the ribbon cable. If you look at the end of the cable as such:

The top-right hole is pin one, with the top-left being pin two, the bottom-right pin nine and bottom-left pin ten. Therefore the pinouts are:

  1. Vcc (5V)
  2. GND
  3. CLK
  4. DIO
  5. STB1
  6. STB2
  7. STB3
  8. STB4
  9. STB5
  10. not connected

For Arduino use, pins 1~4 are the minimum necessary to use one module. Each additional module will require another digital pin connected to STB2, STB3, etc. More on this later. Please note that each module set to full brightness with every LED on consumes 127mA, so it would be wise to use external power with more than one module and other connections with Arduino boards. After spending some time with the module, I made a quick shield with an IDC header to make connection somewhat easier:

Software –  download and install the T1638 library from here. Thanks and kudos to rjbatista at gmail dot com for the library. Initialising modules in the sketch is simple. Include the library with:

then use one of the following for each module:

x is  the Arduino digital pin connected to the module cable pin 4, y is the Arduino digital pin connected to the module cable pin 3, and z is the strobe pin. So if you had one module with data, clock and strobe connected to pins 8, 7,  and 6 you would use:

If you had two modules, with module one’s strobe connected to Arduino digital 6, and module two’s strobe connected to digital 5, you would use:

and so on for more modules.  Now to control the display…

The bi-colour LEDs

Controlling the red/green LEDs is easy. For reference they are numbered zero to seven from left to right. To turn on or off a single LED, use the following:

Using the method above may be simple it is somewhat inefficient. A better way is to address all of the LEDs in one statement. To do this we send two bytes of data in hexadecimal to the display. The MSB (most significant byte) consists of eight bits, each representing one green LED being on (1) or off (0). The LSB (least significant byte) represents the red LEDs.

An easy way to determine the hexadecimal value to control the LEDs is simple, image you have one row of LEDs – the first eight being green and the second eight being red.  Set each digit to 1 for on and 0 for off. The convert the two binary numbers to hexadecimal and use this function:

Where green is the hexadecimal number for the green LEDs and red is the hexadecimal number for the red LEDs. For example, to turn on the first three LEDs as red, and the last three as green, the binary representation will be:

00000111 11100000 which in hexadecimal is E007. So we would use:

which produces the following:

The 7-segment display

To clear the numeric display (but not the LEDs below), simply use:

or to turn on every segment AND all the LEDs, use the following

To display decimal numbers, use the function:

where a is the integer, b is the position for the decimal point (0 for none, 1 for digit 8, 2, for digit 7, 4 for digit 6, 8 for digit 4, etc), and the last parameter (true/false) turns on or off leading zeros. The following sketch demonstrates the use of this function:

and the results:

One of the most interesting features is the ability to scroll text across one or more displays. To do so doesn’t really need an explanation as the included demonstration sketch:

included with the TM1638 library is easily followed. Just insert your text in the const char string[], ensure that the module(s) are wired according to the module definition at the start of the sketch and you’re set. To see the available characters, visit the function page. Note that the display is only seven-segments, so some characters may not look perfect, but in context will give you a good idea – for example:

Finally, you can also individually address each segment of each digit. Consider the contents of this array:

each element represents digits 1~8. The value of each element determines which segment of the digit turns on. For segments a~f, dp the values are 1,2,4,6,16,32,64,128. So the results of using the array above in the following function:

will be:

Naturally you can combine values for each digit to create your own characters, symbols, etcetera. For example, using the following values:

we created:

The buttons

The values of the buttons are returned as a byte value from the function:

As there are eight buttons, each one represents one bit of a binary number that is returned as a byte. The button on the left returns decimal one, and the right returns 128. It can also return simultaneous presses, so pressing buttons one and eight returns 129. Consider the following sketch, which returns the values of the button presses in decimal form, then displays the value:

and the results:

Update – 21/05/2012

A reader from Brazil has used one of the modules as part of a racing simulator – read more about it here, and view his demonstration below.

Update – 08/02/2013

Great tutorial on using these with a Raspberry Pi.

These display boards were a random, successful find. When ordering from dealextreme, do so knowing that your order may take several weeks to arrive as they are not the fastest of online retailers; and your order may be coming from mainland China which can slow things down somewhat. Otherwise the modules work well and considering the minimal I/O and code requirements, are a very good deal.

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, lesson, part review, raspberry pi, TM1638, tutorial34 Comments


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