Archive | room deoderiser

Breaking up an automatic room deodoriser – round two

Again we attempt to break down an automatic room deodoriser.

Updated 18/03/2013

Today we are going to tear down another automatic room deodoriser. Why? Well the first attempt beat me, so it was time to even the score and try again with another type. The supermarket had the following units for $7.99, which seemed a little too cheap:

brandnewss1

The “satisfaction guarantee” gave me a chuckle, the thought of writing to SC Johnson complaining that their products were not that hackable would be interesting. But would it be hackable at all? Let’s find out. The packaging promises a squirt of scent when the unit detects motion, then holds out for 30 minutes until the next release. The word motion hints that there would be a PIR inside the unit. However the instructions mention that the unit does not work that well in dark or bright rooms – which is odd, as PIRs usually work in the dark. Hmm. This unit is somewhat smaller than the previous attempt, yet still offers us a pair of alkaline AA cells:

insidess

Moving on, time to start the disassembly process. The rear shows four screws, easily removed:

backss

revealing the fun things:

gearsss

The motor drive is reduced twice, which then has a geared arm which causes the vertical motion to pressure the cylinder to release the scent. The whole mess of gears was lubricated generously, the whole lot literally came out with the touch of a finger. Removing the gears and goop reveals the motor and control boards, which clipped out easily:

motorpcbss

Interesting – a labelled motor. Very good, what looks like to be a 3V DC motor. The control board is made up of two PCBs, a smaller module that holds a control IC of some sort, and the larger, lesser-densely populated board with the button, status LED and “motion detector”. Let’s have a close-up of that PCB:

pcbaloness

So we have the button, which causes the motor to run; a yellow LED which blinks once every five seconds; and out motion detector in the black casing. The motion detector seemed rather familiar, so I removed the black housing around it with some pliers, which revealed this:

lightsensorss

Huh – that looks just like an LED. The metal object inside the clear casing was even identical to what you would see inside an LED. However, foolishly I broke it off the PCB when removing the housing, so could not get any voltage to it. From reading the instructions earlier on – that mention the light/dark issue, causes me to ponder if this is some sort of light-dependent sensor?

No – it is a photodiode! However the motor looked quite worthwhile. Curious to see what is driving it, I hooked up Mr Fluke to see what happens:

No surprises there, almost three volts DC forward voltage. After applying forward current the circuit applies a quick reverse current to release, thereby causing the gears and arm to ‘squeeze’ down on the scent cylinder. So now we have a circuit board that runs on 3V, which can output 3V for a few seconds every 30 minutes – or at the press of a button.

With regards to current, another measurement was taken:


When free-running, the motor draws around 45 milliamps – and the stall current (that is, the current drawn when I force the spindle to stop) is around 675 milliamps. That is quite a strong little motor, and worth the effort. In general, this has been a good tear down, we scored some AA cells, a good motor and gears, some stink spray, and a timing circuit that could have uses elsewhere. So overall a win – the score has evened with the deodoriser world! High resolution photos available on flickr.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in electronics, hardware hacking, room deoderiser, tutorial4 Comments

Breaking up an automatic room deodoriser – part one

In this article we attempt to break down an automatic room deodoriser and have some fun.

Updated 18/03/2013

[Update – we won round two]

Today we are going to tear down an automatic room deodoriser. Why? Why not! After walking around the supermarket as one does, pontificating over the need for doughnuts – I noticed this package on sale for eight dollars:

unopenedss

What grabbed my attention was the words “movement sensor” and the price tag. A sensor by itself can cost more. Where’s the catch? I am sure the company makes their money back from selling the refills, in a similar method to ink cartridges and razor blades. Good for them. However, perhaps this can be good for us! So into the basket and home it came. My flatmates thought it was a lovely gesture to have one in the hallway. Hah! As Dave Jones would say, “don’t turn it on – take it apart!” So let’s go…

The can of spray went straight into the WC, nothing of interest there. Three alkaline AA cells were included:

alkalinesss

Well that’s a good start, you can always use these in a camera or something else. Armed with a philips-head screwdriver and a pair of needle-nosed pliers, the entire assembly came apart very easily and without force. I must congratulate the designers, you almost get the feeling that this is designed to be repaired if broken, and not replaced. The process of disassembly was quite easy:

1ss1

The front cover came off quite easily. The switch on the right enables/disables the movement sensor; the LED indicates the repeat mode for the spray; and the black switch controls the duration between sprays – off, 9, 18 or 36 minutes.

2ss1

After removing the rear panel with four screws, we can see the motor and one of the two PCBs. Two more screws, and we can remove the electronics and mechanical sections:

3ss2

This is the front-facing part of the motor board. The motor turns one direction then another to have the plastic ‘finger’ push down and release on the aerosol can nozzle. The gear ratios are quite large, allowing the motor to exert quite an amount of torque. The metal base board has some convenient mounting holes as well, so this could be reused easily. If you had a pair of these you could drive something that is quite heavy at a sedate speed.

4ss

Here is the main controller board, with nicely colour-coded JST connectors for leads to the motor, power source (those 3 x AA cells, 4.5V) and to the switch that turns the sensor on and off. The underside is very professional, all SMD:

6ss

The motion detector’s board plugs nicely into the main board, thanks to the 2×9 pin header and socket arrangement:

5ss

Now it is time to see how things work. The first step will be the motor – how much voltage and current does it use? I ran the motor without a load for thirty minutes at 4.5 volts DC – the  motor body did not warm up at all, a good sign that this voltage was suitable. With regards to current, there are two measurements to take – current while free-running, and under maximum load (i.e. feeding the motor 4.5 volts while holding the gears still). While free running, the current drawn was 34 milliamps:

freerunss

… and when I held down the gears so the motor could not turn, the current drawn was 305 milliamps:

maxloadss

So now we have a nice strong motor that can run at 4.5 DC, and draws between 34 and 305 milliamps. That’s a good start. Furthermore, being able to stick the meter display to the desk lamp really makes life easy. Now it is time to investigate the detector. It had a few codes on the PCBs, such as KT-7964, Smart Motion A-06 and RB-S04 which I searched for on the Internet without any luck.

So the next thought was to feed it 4.5 volts DC, and use the Scanalogic2 to analyse any signals or voltages around the PIR sensor module to see what happens. However, the entire system was dead, it would not do a thing. The same problem occurred at four volts DC. No luck either. After the initial power up, the unit should light the LED for one second, then activate the motor for a “first spray” – but nothing. Hmmm.

So at this point we are at a brick wall, however this is not the end. Research will continue to look for details of the PIR unit, and once it is working independently a new post will be published.

This article also shows to me and others that not everything is a success first time. It can be disappointing, however it’s not the end of the world. With every failure comes knowledge which can be used the next time around. So subscribe to the web page updates, and keep an eye out in the future. High resolution images are available from flickr.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in hardware hacking, room deoderiser, tutorial10 Comments


Subscribe via email

Receive notifications of new posts by email.

The Arduino Book

Arduino Workshop

Für unsere deutschen Freunde

Dla naszych polskich przyjaciół ...

Australian Electronics!

Buy and support Silicon Chip - Australia's only Electronics Magazine.

Use of our content…

%d bloggers like this: