Archive | xbee

Book – “Arduino Workshop – A Hands-On Introduction with 65 Projects”

Over the last few years I’ve been writing a few Arduino tutorials, and during this time many people have mentioned that I should write a book. And now thanks to the team from No Starch Press this recommendation has morphed into my new book – “Arduino Workshop“:

shot11

Although there are seemingly endless Arduino tutorials and articles on the Internet, Arduino Workshop offers a nicely edited and curated path for the beginner to learn from and have fun. It’s a hands-on introduction to Arduino with 65 projects – from simple LED use right through to RFID, Internet connection, working with cellular communications, and much more.

Each project is explained in detail, explaining how the hardware an Arduino code works together. The reader doesn’t need any expensive tools or workspaces, and all the parts used are available from almost any electronics retailer. Furthermore all of the projects can be finished without soldering, so it’s safe for readers of all ages.

The editing team and myself have worked hard to make the book perfect for those without any electronics or Arduino experience at all, and it makes a great gift for someone to get them started. After working through the 65 projects the reader will have gained enough knowledge and confidence to create many things – and to continue researching on their own. Or if you’ve been enjoying the results of my thousands of hours of work here at tronixstuff, you can show your appreciation by ordering a copy for yourself or as a gift 🙂

You can review the table of contents, index and download a sample chapter from the Arduino Workshop website.

Arduino Workshop is available from No Starch Press in printed or ebook (PDF, Mobi, and ePub) formats. Ebooks are also included with the printed orders so you can get started immediately.

LEDborder

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, Arduino Workshop, book, books, cellular, clocks, display, distance, ds1307, DS3232, education, EEPROM, freetronics, GPS, graphic, GSM, hardware hacking, I2C, internet, LCD, learning electronics, lesson, no starch press, numeric keypad, part review, product review, projects, RDM630, RDM6300, relay, review, sensor, servo, SMS, time clock, timing, tronixstuff, tutorial, twitter, wireless, xbee13 Comments

Arduino, Android and Seeedstudio Bluetooth Bee

Introduction

In this article we examine the Seeedstudio “Bluetooth Bee” modules and how they can be used in a simple way in conjunction with Android devices to control the Arduino world.  Here is an example of a Bluetooth Bee:

For the curious, the hardware specifications are as follows:

  • Typical -80dBm sensitivity
  • Up to +4dBm RF transmit power
  • Fully Qualified Bluetooth V2.0+EDR 3Mbps Modulation
  • Low Power 1.8V Operation, 1.8 to 3.6V I/O
  • UART interface with programmable baud rate
  • Integrated PCB antenna.
  • XBee compatible headers

You may have noticed that the Bluetooth Bee looks similar to the Xbee-style data transceivers – and it is, in physical size and some pinouts, for example:

The neat thing with the BtB (Bluetooth Bee) is that it is compatible with Xbee sockets and Arduino shields. It is a 3.3V device and has the same pinouts for Vcc, GND, TX and RX – so an existing Xbee shield will work just fine.

In some situations you may want to use your BtB on one UART and have another for debugging or other data transport from an Arduino – which means the need for a software serial port. To do this you can get a “Bees Shield” which allows for two ‘Bee format transceivers on one board, which also has jumpers to select software serial pins for one of them. For example:

Although not the smallest, the Bees Shield proves very useful for experimenting and busy wireless data transmit/receive systems. More about the Bees Shield can be found on their product wiki.

Quick Start 

In the past many people have told me that bluetooth connectivity has been too difficult or expensive to work with. In this article I want to make things as simple as possible, allowing you to just move forward with your ideas and projects. One very useful function is to control an Arduino-compatible board with an Android-based mobile phone that has Bluetooth connectivity. Using the BtB we can create a wireless serial text bridge between the phone and the Arduino, allowing control and data transmission between the two.

We do this by using a terminal application on the Android device – for our examples we will be using “BlueTerm” which can be downloaded from Google Play – search for “blueterm” as shown below:

gplay1

In our Quick Start example, we will create a system where we can turn on or off four Arduino digital output pins from D4~D7. (If you are unsure about how to program an Arduino, please consider this short series of tutorials). The BtB is connected using the Bees shield. This is based on the demonstration sketch made available on the BtB Wiki page – we will use commands from the terminal on the Android device to control the Arduino board, which will then return back status.

As the BtB transmit and receive serial data we will have it ‘listen’ to the virtual serial port on pins 9 and 10 for incoming characters. Using a switch…case function it then makes decisions based on the incoming character. You can download the sketch from here. If you were to modify this sketch for your own use, study the void loop() section to see how the incoming data is interpreted, and how data is sent back to the Android terminal using blueToothSerial.println.

Before using it for the first time you will need to pair the BtB with your Android device. The PIN is set to a default of four zeros. After setting up the hardware and uploading the sketch, wait until the LEDs on the BtB blink alternately – at this point you can get a connection and start communicating. In the following video clip you can see the whole process:


Where to from here?

There are many more commands that can be set using terminal software from a PC with a Bluetooth adaptor, such as changing the PIN, device name and so on. All these are described in the BtB Wiki page along with installation instructions for various operating systems.

Once again I hope you found this article interesting and useful. The Bluetooth Bees are an inexpensive and useful method for interfacing your Arduino to other Bluetooth-compatible devices. For more information and product support, visit the Seeedstudio product pages.

Bluetooth Bees are available from Seeedstudio and their network of distributors.

Disclaimer – Bluetooth Bee products used in this article are promotional considerations made available by Seeedstudio.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in android, arduino, bluetooth, cellular, INT119B2P, lesson, seeedstudio, tutorial, WLS125E1P, xbee

RF Wireless Data with the Seeedstudio RFbee

Introduction

In this article we examine the Seeedstudio RFbee Wireless Data Transceiver nodes. An RFbee is a small wireless data transceiver that can be used as a wireless data bridge in pairs, as well as a node in mesh networking or data broadcasting. Here is an example of an RFbee:

You may have noticed that the RFbee looks similar to the Xbee-style data transceivers – and it is, in physical size and some pinouts, for example:

comparison

However this is where the similarity ends. The RFbee is in fact a small Arduino-compatible development board based on the Atmel ATmega168 microprocessor (3.3V at 8MHz – more on this later) and uses a Texas Instruments CC1101 low-power sub1-GHz RF transceiver chip for wireless transfer. Turning over an RFbee reveals this and more:

But don’t let all this worry you, the RFbee is very simple to use once connected. As a transceiver the following specifications apply:

  • Data rate – 9600, 19200, 38400 or 115200bps
  • Adjustable transmission power in stages between -30dBm and 10 dBm
  • Operating frequency switchable between 868MHz and 915MHz
  • Data transmission can be point-to-point, or broadcast point-to-many
  • Maximum of 256 RFbees can operate in one mesh network
  • draws only 19.3mA whilst transmitting at full power

The pinout for the RFbee are similar to those of an Xbee for power and data, for example:

There is also the ICSP pins if you need to reprogram the ATmega168 direcly with an AVRISP-type programmer.

Getting Started

Getting started is simple – RFbees ship with firmware which allows them to simply send and receive data at 9600bps with full power. You are going to need two or more RFbees, as they can only communicate with their own kind. However any microcontroller with a UART can be used with RFbees – just connect 3.3V, GND, and the microcontroller’s UART TX and RX to the RFbee and you’re away. For our examples we will be using Arduino-compatible boards. If Arduino is new to you, consider our tutorials first.

If you ever need to update the firmware, or reset the RFbee to factory default after some wayward experimenting – download the firmware which is in the form of an Arduino sketch (RFBee_v1_1.pde) which can be downloaded from the repository. (This has been tested with Arduino v23). In the Arduino IDE, set the board type to “Arduino Pro or Pro Mini (3.3V, 8MHz) w/ATmega168”. From a hardware perspective, the easiest way to update the firmware is via a 3.3V FTDI cable or an UartSBee board, such as:

xbs4

You will also find a USB interface useful for controlling your RFbee via a PC or configuration (see below). In order to do this,  you will need some basic terminal software. A favourite and simple example is called … “Terminal“. (Please donate to the author for their efforts).

Initial Testing

After connecting your RFbee to a PC, run your terminal software and set it for 9600 bps – 8 – None – no handshaking, and click the check box next to “+CR”. For example:

term1

Select your COM: port (or click “ReScan” to find it) and then “Connect”. After a moment “OK” should appear in the received text area. Now, get yourself an Arduino or compatible board of some sort that has the LED on D13 (or substitute your own) and upload the following sketch:

Finally, connect the Arduino board to an RFbee in this manner:

  • Arduino D0 to RFbee TX
  • Arduino D1 to RFbee RX
  • Arduino 3.3V to RFbee Vcc
  • Arduino GND to RFbee GND
and the other RFbee to your PC and check it is connected using the terminal software described earlier. Now check the terminal is communicating with the PC-end RFbee, and then send the character ‘A’, ‘B’ or ‘C’. Note that the LED on the Arduino board will blink one, two or three times respectively – or five times if another character is received. It then reports back “Blinking completed!” to the host PC. For example (click to enlarge):
term2

Although that was a very simple demonstration, in doing so you can prove that your RFbees are working and can send and receive serial data. If you need more than basic data transmission, it would be wise to get a pair of RFbees to experiment with before committing to a project, to ensure you are confident they will solve your problem.

More Control

If you are looking to use your RFbees in a more detailed way than just sending data at 9600 bps at full power, you will need to  control and alter the parameters of your RFbees using the terminal software and simple AT-style commands. If you have not already done so, download and review the RFbee data sheet downloadable from the “Resources” section of this page. You can use the AT commands to easily change the data speed, power output (to reduce current draw), change the frequency, set transmission mode (one way or transceive) and more.

Reading and writing AT commands is simple, however at first you need to switch the RFbee into ‘command mode’ by sending +++ to it. (When sending +++ or AT commands, each must be followed with a carriage return (ASCII 13)). Then you can send commands or read parameter status. To send a command, just send AT then the command then the parameter. For example, to set the data rate (page ten of the data sheet) to 115200 bps, send ATBD3 and the RFbee will respond with OK.

You can again use the terminal software to easily send and receive the commands. To switch the RFbee from command mode back to normal data mode, use ATO0 (that’s AT then the letter O then zero) or power-cycle the RFbee.

RFbee as an Arduino-compatible board with inbuilt wireless

As mentioned previously the RFbee is based around an Atmel ATmega168 running at 8MHz with the Arduino bootloader. In other words, we have a tiny Arduino-compatible board in there to do our bidding. If you are unfamiliar with the Arduino system please see the tutorials listed here. However there are a couple of limitations to note – you will need an external USB-serial interface (as noted in Getting Started above), and not all the standard Arduino-type pins are available. Please review page four of the data sheet to see which RFbee pins match up to which Arduino pins.

If for some reason you just want to use your RFbee as an Arduino-compatible board, you can do so. However if you upload your own sketch you will lose the wireless capability. To restore your RFbee follow the instructions in Getting Started above.

The firmware that allows data transmission is also an Arduino sketch. So if you need to include RF operation in your sketch, first use a copy of the RFBee_v1_1.pde included in the repository – with all the included files. Then save this somewhere else under a different name, then work your code into the main sketch. To save you the effort you can download a fresh set of files which are used for our demonstration. But before moving forward, we need to learn about controlling data flow and device addresses…

Controlling data flow

As mentioned previously, each RFbee can have it’s own numerical address which falls between zero and 255. Giving each RFbee an address allows you to select which RFbee to exchange data with when there is more than two in the area. This is ideal for remote control and sensing applications, or to create a group of autonomous robots that can poll each other for status and so on.

To enable this method of communication in a simple form several things need to be done. First, you set the address of each RFbee with the AT command ATMAx (x=address). Then set each RFbee with ATOF2. This causes data transmitted to be formatted in a certain method – you send a byte which is the address of the transmitting RFbee, then another byte which is the address of the intended receipient RFbee, then follow with the data to send. Finally send command ATAC2 – which enables address checking between RFbees. Data is then sent using the command

Where data is … the data to send. You can send a single byte, or an array of bytes. length is the number of bytes you are sending. sourceAddress and destinationAddress are relevant to the RFbees being used – you set these addresses using the ATMAx described earlier in this section.

If you open the file rfbeewireless.pde in the download bundle, scroll to the end of the sketch which contains the following code:

This is a simple example of sending data out from the RFbee. The RFbee with this sketch (address 1) sends the array of bytes (testdata[]) to another RFbee with address 2.  You can disable address checking by a receiving RFbee with ATAC0 – then it will receive any data send by other RFbees.

To receive data use the following function:

The variable result will hold the incoming data, len is the number of bytes to expect, sourceAddress and destinationAddress are the source (transmitting RFbee) and destination addresses (receiving RFbee). rssi and lqi are the signal strength and link quality indicator – see the TI CC1101 datasheet for more information about these. By using more than two RFbees set with addresses you can selectively send and receive data between devices or control them remotely. Finally, please note that RFbees are still capable of sending and receiving data via the TX/RX pins as long as the sketch is not executing the sendTestData() loop.

I hope you found this introduction interesting and useful. The RFbees are an inexpensive and useful alternative to the popular Xbee modules and with the addition of the Arduino-compatible board certainly useful for portable devices, remote sensor applications or other data-gathering exercises.

For more information and product support, visit the Seeedstudio product pages.

RFbees are available from Seeedstudio and their network of distributors.

Disclaimer – RFbee products used in this article are promotional considerations made available by Seeedstudio.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, education, lesson, RF, rfbee, seeedstudio, tutorial, wireless, WLS126E1P, xbee

Product Announcement: The Zigduino

Hello readers

Recently the people at Logos Electromechanical have announced their new product – the Zigduino.

The Zigduino is an Arduino-compatible microcontroller platform that integrates an 802.15.4 radio on the board. The radio can be configured to support any 802.15.4-based protocol, including ZigBeeRoute Under MAC/6LoWPAN, and RF4CE. It uses a reverse polarity SMA connector (RP-SMA) for an external antenna. This allows the user to use nearly any existing 2.4 GHz antenna with it. The Zigduino runs on 3.3V, but all I/O pins are 5V compatible.

Pictured below is a production Zigduino kit with all components:

Thankfully all that SMD word is done for you. The only soldering required is the aerial socket, Arduino headers and the DC socket. All the components shown in the image above are included with purchase. The Zigduino specifications include (from the website):

Microcontroller Atmega128RFA1
Operating Voltage 3.3V
Input Voltage (recommended) 7-18V
Input Voltage (maximum) 6-30V (transients to -20V and +60V)
Digital I/O Pins 14 + 3 auxiliary
PWM Output Pins 6
Analog Input Pins 6 (0-1.8V)
I/O Protection ±30V transient
-2.5V to +5.8V continuous
DC Current per I/O Pin 20 mA
DC Current for 5V Pin 250 mA
DC Current for 3.3V Pin 200 mA
Flash Memory 128 KB of which 2 KB is used by the bootloader
SRAM 16 KB
EEPROM 4 KB
Clock Speed 16 MHz
RF transmit power +3.5 dBm
Receiver sensitivity -100 dB
Antenna gain 2 dBi
Current Draw 30 mA (transmitting, USB, no I/O connections)
15 mA (transmitting, no USB, no I/O connections)
6 mA (radio off, no USB, no I/O connections)
250 μA (sleep)

Compatibility

  • Compatible with any shield that supports 3.3V logic
  • Compatible with existing Arduino libraries that do not use hard-coded pin definitions
  • Compatible with Arduino IDE with updated compiler, avr-gcc-4.3.3 or later.

Software

Power

The Zigduino can be powered through the USB connection or with an external power supply. The power source with the highest voltage is selected automatically.

External power can be supplied via a wall wart or a battery. It can be connected with a 2.1mm center-positive plug inserted into the power jack. Alternately, external power can be connected through the GND and VIN pins of the POWER header.

The board will operate correctly on an input voltage between 6V and 30V. It will survive transients as large as -20V or +60V. However, higher supply voltages may cause excessive heat dissipation at higher current draws. The input voltage regulator has integral overtemperature protection, so you can’t permanently damage the board this way. However, the board may not work correctly under these circumstances.

The power pins are as follows:

  • VIN — The input voltage to the Arduino board when it is running from external power, i.e. not USB bus power.
  • 5V — The regulated 5V used to power 5V components on the board and external 5V shields. It comes either from the USB or from the VIN via the 5V regulator. Maximum current draw is 250 mA.
  • 3V3 — The regulated 3.3V supply that powers the microcontroller. It is derived from the 5V bus via a second regulator. Maximum current draw is 200 mA.
  • GND — Ground pins.

Memory

The ATmega128RFA1 has 128 KB of flash memory, of which 2 KB is occupied by the bootloader. It also has 16 KB of SRAM (the most of any Arduino-compatible board) and 4 KB of EEPROM, which can be accessed through the EEPROM library.

Input and Output

Each of the 14 digital pins of the Zigduino can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead(). Each pin operates at 3.3V and can source or sink 10 mA. Each also has an internal pullup, which is disabled by default. Each pin is protected against ±30V spikes and can tolerate continuous 5V input.

The six analog input pins, labeled A0 – A5, are likewise protected against ±30V spikes and can tolerate continuous 5V input. Each provides 10 bits of resolution and measures 0 – 1.8V. It is possible to change to a lower top voltage through use of the AREF pin and the analogReference() function.

A key design goal of the Zigduino is maintaining compatibility with existing shields to the greatest extent possible. The ATmega128RFA1’s peripherals are arranged slightly differently than the corresponding peripherals on the ATmega328 used in the stock Arduino. Therefore, in order to provide the desired shield compatibility, there are three solder jumpers provided on the back of the board. They function as follows:

  • Digital pin 11 can be set as either SPI MOSI or a PWM output. Neither option is selected as shipped. SPI MOSI is also available on the SPI connector at all times along with SCK and MISO.
  • Analog pin 4 can be set as either A4 or I2C SDA. Neither option is selected as shipped. Both I2C pins are available on the I2C connector.
  • Analog pin 5 can be set as either A4 or I2C SCL. Neither option is selected as shipped. Both I2C pins are available on the I2C connector.

The following additional special functions are available:

  • Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX) — Used to transmit and receive TTL serial data. These pins are connected to the corresponding pins on the FTDI USB interface chip.
  • PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11 — Provides 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function. Pin 11 must be selected for PWM operation with the solder jumper on the back of the board.
  • SPI: 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK) — These pins support SPI communications using the SPI library. Pin 11 must be selected for SPI operation with the solder jumper on the back, or SPI must be accessed with the SPI connector.
  • LED: 13 — This is the built-in LED on digital pin 13. When the pin is high, the LED is on.
  • External Interrupts: 2, 3, 6, and 7 — These pins can be configured to trigger and interrupt on a low value, high value, or an edge. See the attachInterrupt() function for details. The two I2C pins can also be used as interrupts.
  • I2C: A4 (SDA) and A5 (SCL) — These pins support I2C communications using the Wire library. They must be selected for I2C operation with the jumpers on the back or I2C must be accessed through the I2C connector. They can also be configured as interrupts.

This is one very capable Arduino-compatible board and sure to find many uses. For updates and new ideas consider following the Logos Electromechanical blog page.  Furthermore associated Zigduino files can be found on Github.

So if you are looking to expand into the world of personal-area networks, Zigbee wireless and so on –  you could do very well by considering a Zigduino or two. For more information, questions, support, and to purchase visit the product website, Seeed Studio or lipoly.de

Posted in 802.15.4, arduino, Atmega128RFA1, review, wireless, xbee, zigduino

Review: The Gravitech Arduino Nano family

Hello Readers

In this article we will examine a variety of products received for review from Gravitech in the United States – the company that designed and build the Arduino Nano. We have a Nano and some very interesting additional modules to have a look at.

So let’s start out review with the Arduino Nano. What is a Nano? A very, very small version of our Arduino Duemilanove boards. It contains the same microcontroller (ATmega328) but in SMD form; has all the I/O pins (plus two extra analogue inputs); and still has a USB interface via the FT232 chip. But more on that later. Nanos arrive in reusable ESD packaging which is useful for storage when not in use:

Patriotic Americans should note that the Nano line is made in the USA. Furthermore, here is a video clip of Nanos being made:

For those who were unsure about the size of the Nano, consider the following images:

You can easily see all the pin labels and compare them to your Duemilanove or Uno board. There is also a tiny reset button, the usual LEDs, and the in circuit software programmer pins. So you don’t miss out on anything by going to a Nano. When you flip the board over, the rest of the circuitry is revealed, including the FTDI USB>serial converter IC:

Those of you familiar with Arduino systems should immediately recognise the benefit of the Nano – especially for short-run prototype production. The reduction in size really is quite large. In the following image, I have traced the outline of an Arduino Uno and placed the Nano inside for comparison:

So tiny… the board measures 43.1mm (1.7″) by 17.8mm (0.7″). The pins on this example were pre-soldered – and are spaced at standard 2.54mm (0.1″) intervals – perfect for breadboarding or designing into your own PCB –  however you can purchase a Nano without the pins to suit your own mounting purposes. The Nano meets all the specifications of the standard Arduino Duemilanove-style boards, except naturally the physical dimensions.

Power can be supplied to the Nano via the USB cable; feeding 5V directly into the 5V pin, or 7~12 (20 max, not recommended) into the Vin pin. You can only draw 3.3V at up to 50 mA when the Nano is running on USB power, as the 3.3V is sourced from the FTDI USB>serial IC. And the digital I/O pins still allow a current draw up to 40 mA each. From a software perspective you will not have any problems, as the Nano falls under the same board classification as the (for example) Arduino Duemilanove:

Therefore one could take advantage of all the Arduino fun and games – except for the full-size shields. But as you will read soon, Gravitech have got us covered on that front. If the Arduino system is new to you, why not consider following my series of tutorials? They can be found here. In the meanwhile, to put the size into perspective – here is a short video of a Nano blinking some LEDs!

Now back to business. As the Nano does not use standard Arduino shields, the team at Gravitech have got us covered with a range of equivalent shields to enable all sorts of activities. The first of this is their Ethernet and microSD card add-on module:

and the underside:

Again this is designed for breadboarding, or you could most likely remove the pins if necessary. The microSD socket is connected as expected via the SPI bus, and is fully compatible with the default Arduino SD library. As shown in the following image the Nano can slot directly into the ethernet add-in module:

The Ethernet board requires an external power supply, from 7 to 12 volts DC. The controller chip is the usual Wiznet 5100 model, and therefore the Ethernet board is fully compatible with the default Ethernet Arduino library. We tested it with the example web server sketch provided with the Arduino IDE and it all just worked.

The next add-on module to examine is the 2MOTOR board:

… and the bottom:

Using this module allows control of two DC motors with up to two amps of current each via pulse-width modulation. Furthermore, there is a current feedback circuit for each motor so you measure the motor load and adjust power output – interesting. So a motorised device could sense when it was working too hard and ease back a little (like me on a Saturday). All this is made possible by the use of the common L298 dual full-bridge motor driver IC. This is quite a common motor driver IC and is easy to implement in your sketches. The use of this module and the Nano will help reduce the size of any robotics or motorised project. Stay tuned for use of this board in future articles.

Next in this veritable cornucopia of  add-on modules is the USBHOST board:

turning it over …

Using the Maxim MAX3421E host controller IC you can interface with all sorts of devices via USB, as well as work with the new Android ADK. The module will require an external power supply of between 7 and 12 volts DC, with enough current to deal with the board, a Nano and the USB device under control – one amp should be more than sufficient. I will be honest and note that USB and Arduino is completely new to me, however it is somewhat fascinating and I intend to write more about using this module in the near future. In the meanwhile, many examples can be found here.

For a change of scene there is also a group of Xbee wireless communication modules, starting with the Xbee add-on module:

The Xbee itself is not included, only shown for a size comparison. Turning the module over:

It is nice to see a clearly-labelled silk screen on the PCB. If you are unfamiliar with using the Xbee wireless modules for data communication, you may find my introductory tutorial of interest. Furthermore, all of the Gravitech Nano modules are fully software compatible with my tutorial examples, so getting started will be a breeze. Naturally Gravitech also produce an Xbee USB interface board, to enable PC communication over your wireless modules:

Again, note that the Xbee itself is not included, however they can be supplied by Gravitech. Turning the board over reveals another highly-detailed silk screen:

All of the Gravitech Xbee modules support both series 1.0 and 2.5 Xbees, in both standard and professional variants. The USB module also supports the X-CTU configuration software from Digi.

Finally – leaving possibly the most interesting part until last, we have the MP3 Player add-on board:

and on the B-side:

The MP3 board is designed around the VS1053B MP3 decoder IC. It can also decode Ogg Vorbis, AAC, WMA and MID files. There is a 3.5mm stereo output socket to connect headphones and so on. As expected, the microSD card runs from the SPI pins, however SS is pin 4. Although it may be tempting to use this to make a home-brew MP3 player, other uses could include: recorded voice messages for PA systems such as fire alarm notices, adding sound effects to various projects or amusement machines, or whatever else you can come up with.

Update – We have examined the MP3 board in more detail with a beginner’s tutorial.

The Arduino Nano and related boards really are tiny, fully compatible with their larger brethren, and will prove very useful. Although this article was an introductory review, stay tuned for further projects and articles that will make use of the Nano and other boards. If you have any questions or enquiries please direct them to Gravitech via their contact page. Gravitech products including the Arduino Nano family are available directly from their website or these distributors.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow on twitterfacebook, or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the products reviewed in this article are promotional considerations made available by Gravitech]

High resolution photos are available on flickr.

Otherwise, have fun, be good to each other – and make something! 

Posted in arduino, ethernet, gravitech, microcontrollers, mp3, nano, part review, xbee0 Comments

The 555 Precision Timer IC

Learn about the useful and inexpensive 555 timer IC in this detailed tutorial!

Hello readers

Today we revisit one of the most popular integrated circuits ever conceived – the 555 timer IC. “Triple-five”, “five-five-five”, “triple-nickel” … call it what you will, it has been around for thirty-eight years. Considering the pace of change in the electronics industry, the 555 could be the constant in an ever-changing universe. But what is the 555? How does it work? How can we use it? And … why do we still use it? In this introductory article we will try to answer these questions. If you would like to see some examples, visit here.

What is the 555?

The 555 timer is the solution to a problem found by the inventor – Hans Camenzind.  He saw the need through his radio work for a part that could act as an oscillator or a timer [1]; and working as a contractor for Signetics developed the 555. (Signetics was purchased by Philips in 1975, and their semiconductor division was spun off as NXP in 2006). The 555 has to be one of the most used ICs ever invented. It is used for timing, from microseconds to hours; and creating oscillations (which is another form of timing for the pedants out there). It is very flexible with operation voltage, you can throw from 4.5 to 18V at it; you can sink or source 200mA of current through the output; and it is very cheap – down to around nine cents if you order several thousand units. Finally, the 555 can achieve all of this with a minimum of basic components – some resistors and capacitors.

Here are some examples in the common DIP casing:

555sss

Furthermore a quick scan of suppliers’ websites show that the 555 is also available in surface-mount packages such as SOIC, MSOP and TSSOP. You can also source a 556 timer IC, which contains two 555 ICs. (What’s 555 + 555? 556…) Furthermore, a 558 was available in the past, but seems rather tricky to source these days.

556sss

How does the 555 work?

The 555 contains two major items:

  • A comparator – a device which compares two voltages, and switches its output to indicate which is larger, and
  • A flip-flop – a circuit that has two stable states, and those states can be changed by applying a voltage to one of the flip-flop’s inputs.

Here is the 555 functional diagram from the TI 555 data sheet.pdf:

functiondiagram

… and the matching pin-out diagram:

Don’t let the diagrams above put you off. It is easier to explain how the 555 operates within the context of some applications, so we will now explore the three major uses of the 555 timer IC in detail – these being astable,  monostable, and bistable operations, in theory and in practice.

Astable operation

Astable is an on-off-on… type of oscillation – and generates what is known as a square wave, for example:

sqwaveastable

There are three values to take note of:

  • time (s) – the time for a complete cycle. The number of cycles per second is known as the frequency, which is the reciprocal of time (s);
  • tm (s) – the duration of time for which the voltage (or logic state) is high;
  • ts (s) – the duration of time for which the voltage (or logic state) is low.

With the use of two resistors and one capacitor, you can determine the period durations. Consider the following schematic:

555astableschematic

Calculating values for R1, R2 and C1 was quite simple. You can either determine the length of time you need (t) in seconds, or the frequency (Hz) – the number of pulses per second.

t (time) = 0.7 x (R1 + [2 x R2]) x C1

f (frequency) = 1.4 / {(R1 + [2 x R2]) x C1}

Where R1 and R2 are measured in ohms, and C1 is measured in farads. Remember that 1 microfarad = 1.0 × 10-6 farads, so be careful to convert your capacitor values to farads carefully. It is preferable to keep the value of C1 as low as possible for two reasons – one, as capacitor tolerances can be quite large, the larger the capacitor, the greater your margin of error; and two, capacitor values can be affected by temperature.

How the circuit works is relatively simple. At the time power is applied, the voltage at pin 2 (trigger) is less than 1/3Vcc. So the flip-flop is switched to set the 555 output to high. C1 will charge via R1 and R2. After a period of time (Tm from the diagram above) the voltage at pin 6 (threshold) goes above 2/3Vcc. At this point, the flip-flop is switched to set the 555 output to low. Furthermore, this enables the discharge function – so C1 will discharge via R2. After a period of time (Ts from the diagram above) the voltage at pin 2 (trigger) is less than 1/3Vcc. So the flip-flop is switched to set the 555 output to high… and the cycle repeats.

Now, for an example, I want to create a pulse of 1Hz (that is, one cycle per second). It would be good to use a small value capacitor, a 0.1uF. In farads this is 0.0000001 farads. Phew. So our equation is 1=1.4/{(R1 + [2 x R2]) x C1}. Which twists out leaving us R1=8.2Mohm, R2=2.9MOhm and C1 is 0.1uF. I don’t have a 2.9MOhm resistor, so will try a 2.7MOhm value, which will give a time value of around 0.9s. C2 in astable mode is optional, and used if there is a lot of electrical noise in the circuit. Personally, I use one every time, a 0.01uF ceramic capacitor does nicely. Here is our example in operation:

Notice how the LED is on for longer than it is off, that is due to the ‘on’ time being determined by R1+R2, however the ‘off’ time is determined by R2 only. The ‘on’ time can be expressed as a percentage of the total pulse time, and this is called the duty cycle. If you have a 50% duty cycle, the LED would be on and off for equal periods of time. To alter the duty cycle, place a small diode (e.g. a 1N4148) over pins 7 (anode) and 2 (cathode). Then you can calculate the duty cycle as:

Tm = 0.7 x R1 x C1 (the ‘on’ time)

Ts = 0.7 x R2 x C1 (the ‘off’ time)

Furthermore, the 555 can only control around 200mA of current from the output to earth, so if you need to oscillate something with more current, use a switching transistor or a relay between the output on pin 3 and earth. If you are to use a relay, put a 1N4001 diode between pin 3 (anode) and the relay coil (cathode); and a 1N418 in parallel with the relay coil, but with the anode on the earth side. This stops any reverse current from the relay coil when it switches contacts.

Monostable operation

Mono for one – one pulse that is. Monostable use is also known as a “one-shot” timer.  So the output pin (3) stays low until the 555 receives a trigger pulse (drop to low) on pin 2. The length of the resulting pulse is easy to calculate:

T = 1.1 x R1 x C1;

where T is time in seconds, R1 is resistance in ohms, and C1 is capacitance in farads. Once again, due to the tolerances of capacitors, the longest time you should aim for is around ten minutes. Even though your theoretical result for T might be 9 minutes, you could end up with 8 minutes 11 seconds. You might really need those extra 49 seconds to run away…  Though you could always have one 555 trigger another 555… but if you were to do that, you might as well use a circuit built around an ATmega328 with Arduino bootloader.

Now time for an example. Let’s have a pulse output length of (as close as possible to) five seconds. So, using the equation, 5 = 1.1 x R1 x C1… I have a 10 uF capacitor, so C1 will be 0.00001 farads. Therefore R1 will be 454,545 ohms (in theory)… the closest I have is a 470k, so will try that and see what happens. Note that it you don’t want a reset button (to cancel your pulse mid-way), just connect pin 4 to Vs. Here is the schematic for our example:

555monostable

How the monostable works is quite simple. Nothing happens when power is applied, as R2 is holding the trigger voltage above 1/3Vcc. When button S1 is pushed, the trigger voltage falls below 1/3Vcc, which causes the flip-flop to set the 555’s output to high. Then C1 is charged via R1 until the threshold voltage 2/3Vcc is reached, at which point the flip-flip sets the output low and C1 discharges. Nothing further happens until S1 is pressed again. The presence of the second button S2 is to function as a reset switch. That is, while the output is high the reset button, if pressed, will set the output low and set C1 to discharge.

Below is a video of my example at work. First I let it run the whole way through, then the second and subsequent times I reset it shortly after the trigger. No audio in clip:

Once again, we now have a useful form of a one-shot timer with our 555.

Bistable operation

Bistable operation is where the 555′s output is either high, or low – but not oscillating. If you pulse the trigger, the output becomes and stays high, until you pulse reset. With a bistable 555 you can make a nice soft-touch electronic switch for a project… let’s do that now, it is so simple you don’t need one of my quality schematics. But here you are anyway:

555bistablesch

In this example. pressing S1 sets the voltage at pin 2 (trigger) to below 1/3Vcc, thereby setting the output to high – therefore we call S1 our ‘on’ switch. As pin 6 (threshold) is permanently connected to GND, it cannot be used to set the output to low. The only way to set the output back to low is by pressing S2 – the reset button, which we can call the ‘off’ switch. Couldn’t be easier, could it? And that output pin could switch a transistor or a relay on or off, who knows? Your only limit is your imagination. And here’s one more video clip:

And there you have it – three ways in which we can use our 555 timer ICs. But in the year 2011, why do we still use a 555? Price, simplicity, an old habit, or the fact that there are so many existing designs out there ready to use. There will be many arguments for and against continued use of the 555 – but as long as people keep learning about electronics, the 555 may still have a long and varied future ahead of it.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

References

[1] “The 555 Timer IC – An interview with Hans Camenzind” (Jack Ward – semiconductormuseum.com)

Various diagrams and images from the Texas Instruments NE555 data sheet.

Posted in 555, clocks, COM-09273, electronics, LCD, lesson, tronixstuff, tutorial, xbee16 Comments

Kit Review – adafruit industries XBee adaptor kit

Hello readers

Today we are going to examine a small yet useful kit from adafruit industries – their XBee adaptor kit. The purpose of doing so was to save some money. How? I needed another XBee USB explorer board to connect a PC to an XBee (as we have done in Moving Forward with Arduino – Chapter Fourteen), but they are around Au$33. However I already have an FTDI USB cable, so all I really need is this kit, as it will work with the FTDI cable. So this saves me around $20.

As usual the adafruit kit packaging is simple, safe and reusable:

bagss1

The components included are good as usual, including a great solder-masked, silk-screened PCB and an excess of header pins. Got to love a bonus, no matter how small:

componentsss

This did not take very long to assemble at all. After checking the parts against the parts list, it was time to fire up the iron and solder away. As usual the kit is almost over-documented on the adafruit web pages. But that is a good thing…

gettingtheress

Be careful when you place R3, make sure it doesn’t lean in towards the end of the IC too much, otherwise they could touch, or even worse – stop the IC from being seated properly:

closeicresistorss

Regular readers will know I get annoyed when IC sockets are not included with kits – but for the first time it is fine with me. If you use a socket, the IC will be elevated too much and stop the XBee from being inserted onto the board. But apart from R3 almost stopping the show, everything went smoothly. At the time you need to solder in the 2mm header socket strips for the XBee, the easiest way (if possible) is to seat an XBee in the sockets, then into the PCB:

2mmheadersss

Once you have followed the excellent instructions, the last thing to solder is the pins for the FTDI cable. You can either lay them out flat on the PCB, or insert them through the holes. This is my preferred way, and seating the lot in a breadboard to hold it steady is a good idea:

endheadersss

And finally, we’re finished:

finishedss

A quick check with Windows to ensure everything is OK:

And we are ready for communications. This was a very simple and inexpensive board to assemble – and excellent value if you need USB connection to your PC and you already have an FTDI cable.

Well I hope you found this review interesting, and helped you think of something new to make with XBees. You can purchase the kit directly from adafruit industries.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts. Or join our new Google Group. High resolution images are available on flickr.

[Note – The kit was purchased by myself personally and reviewed without notifying the manufacturer or retailer]

Posted in adafruit, kit review, part review, WRL-08687, xbee2 Comments

Moving Forward with Arduino – Chapter 14 – XBee introduction

Learn how to use XBee wireless data transceivers with Arduino. This is part of a series originally titled “Getting Started with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 02/03/2013

We will examine the Series 1 XBee wireless data transceivers from Digi in the USA. Although in the past we have experimented with the inexpensive 315MHz transmit/receive pair modules (chapter 11), they have been somewhat low in range and slow with data transmission. The XBee system changes this for the better.

First of all, what is an Xbee module? It is a very small piece of hardware that can connect wirelessly with another using the Zigbee communication protocols. There are many different models, including aerial types and power outputs. In this tutorial we’re using Series One XBees.

From Wikipedia, Zigbee is:

ZigBee is a specification for a suite of high level communication protocols using small, low-power digital radios based on the IEEE 802.15.4-2003 standard for wireless home area networks (WHANs), such as wireless light switches with lamps, electrical meters with in-home-displays, consumer electronics equipment via short-range radio. The technology defined by the ZigBee specification is intended to be simpler and less expensive than other WPANs, such as Bluetooth. ZigBee is targeted at radio-frequency (RF) applications that require a low data rate, long battery life, and secure networking.

Phew. For this chapter I will try and keep things as simple as possible to start off with. Here is an image of a typical Xbee unit:

Note that the pin spacing is small than 2.54mm, so you cannot just drop these into a breadboard. However for the purposes of our experimenting more equipment is needed. Therefore I am making use of this retail package from Sparkfun:

xbeeretailpackopenedsmall

This bundle includes two Xbee modules, an Xbee shield to connect one of the modules to an Arduino Uno-style board. When it comes time to solder the sockets into your shield, the best way is to insert them into another shield that is upside down, then drop the new shield on top and solder. For example:

solder2s

Finally, the bundle also includes a USB Explorer board, which allows us to connect one Xbee to a personal computer. This allows us to display serial data received by the Xbee using terminal software on the PC. One can also adjust certain Xbee hardware parameters by using the explorer board such software.

Let’s do that now. You will need some terminal software loaded on your computer. For example, Hyperterminal or Realterm. Plug an Xbee into the explorer board, and that into your PC via a USB cable. Determine which port (for example COM2:) it is using with your operating system, then create a new terminal connection. Set he connection to 9600 speed, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit and hardware flow control. For example, in Hyperterminal this would look like:

Once you have established the connection, press “+++” (that is, plus three times, don’t press enter) and wait. The terminal screen should display “OK”. This means you are in the XBee configuration mode, where we can check the settings and change some parameters of the module. Enter “ATID” and press enter. The terminal window should display a four-digit number, which is the network ID of the module. It should be set by default to 3332. Unless you plan on creating a huge mesh network anytime soon, leave it be. To be sure your modules will talk to each other, repeat this process with your other XBee and make sure it also returns 3332. However as this is the default value, they should be fine.

Now for our first example of data transmission, insert one Xbee into the explorer module, and the other into the Xbee shield. With regards to the Xbee shield – whenever it is connected to an Arduino board and you about to upload a sketch, look for a tiny switch and change it to DLINE from UART. Don’t forget to change it back after uploading the sketch. See:

shieldswitchss

We are going to use the two Xbee modules as a straight, one-way serial line. That is, send some data out of the TX pin on the transmit board, and receive it into the terminal on the PC. Now upload this sketch into your Arduino board. This is a simple sketch, it just sends numbers out via the serial output. Then set the switch on the shield back to UART, and reset the board. If you can, run this board on external power and put it away from the desk, to give you the feeling that this is working 🙂

Note: More often that not one can purchase AC plug packs that have USB sockets in them, for charging fruity music players, and so on.

acusbss

Or you might have received one as a mobile phone charger. These are great for powering Arduino boards without using a PC. Now ensure your explorer module is plugged in, and use the terminal software to connect to the port the explorer is plugged into. After connecting, you should be presented with a scrolling list of numbers from 0 to 99, as per example 14.1 sketch:

numbers

How did you go? Sometimes I used to get the COM: ports mixed up on the PC, so that is something to keep track of. If you are powering both Xbees from your PC using USB cables, double-check the terminal software is looking at the explorer board, as an Arduino transmitting serial data through an Xbee shield will still send the same data back to the PC via USB.

Now that we have sent data in one direction, we can start to harness the true power of Xbees – they are transceivers, i.e. send and receive data. Next, we’ll create an on-demand temperature and light-level sensor. Our arduino board will have a temperature sensor and a light-dependent resistor, and using the terminal on the computer, we can request a temperature or light-level reading from the remote board. More about temperature sensors in chapter two. First of all, the remote board hardware setup:

exam14p2boardss

… and the schematic:

exam14p2schemss

 

It never hurts to elevate your other Xbee:

xbeewallss

For the PC side of things, use the explorer board and USB cable. Here is the sketch. It is quite simple. The remote board ‘listens’ to its serial in line. If it receives a “1”, it reads the temperature, converts it to Celsius and Fahrenheit, and writes the result to its serial out line, which is sent over our Xbee data bridge and received by the host computer. A “2” will result in the analogue value of the photocell to be sent back as a “light level”. Once again we use the terminal software to control the system.  Here is a quick video of the terminal in action:

The speed is quite good, almost instantaneous. By now hopefully you can see how easy it is to end some data backwards and forwards over the ether. The range is only limited by the obstacles between the Xbee transceivers and the particular power output of each model. With example 14.2, there were two double-brick walls between them. Furthermore, we can build fully computer-independent systems that can talk to each other, such as more portable remote controls, or other data-gathering systems. In the next few chapters, sooner rather than later.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, RTL-11445, tutorial, wireless, WRL-09819, WRL-11215, xbee9 Comments


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