Tag Archive | "button"

Tutorial: Analog input for multiple buttons – Part Two

This is chapter forty-six of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

[Updated 19/01/2013]

A while back I described how to read multiple buttons using only one analogue input pin. However we could only read one button at a time. In this instalment we revisit this topic and examine an improved method of doing so which allows for detecting more than one button being pressed at the same time. This method is being demonstrated as it is inexpensive and very easy to configure.

(For a more exact and expensive method please consider the use of the Microchip MCP23017 which allows for sixteen inputs via the I2C bus).

As you know the analogue input pins of the Arduino can read a voltage of between zero and five volts DC and return this measurement as an integer between zero and 1023. Using a small external circuit called a “R-2R ladder”, we can alter the voltage being measured by the analogue pin by diverting the current through one or more resistors by our multiple buttons. Each combination of buttons theoretically will cause a unique voltage to be measured, which we can then interpret in our Arduino sketch and make decisions based on the button(s) pressed.

First the circuit containing four buttons:

circuit1

Can you see why this is called an R-2R circuit? When building your circuit – use 1% tolerance resistors – and check them with a multimeter to be sure. As always, test and experiment before committing to anything permanent.

Now to determine a method for detecting each button pressed, and also combinations. When each button is closed, the voltage applied to analogue pin zero will be different. And if two buttons are pressed at once, the voltage again will be different. Therefore the value returned by the function analogRead() will vary for each button-press combination. To determine these, I connected a numeric display to my Arduino-compatible board, then simply sent the analogRead() value to the display. You can see some of the results of this in the following video:

The analogRead() results of pressing every combination of button can be found in the following table:

After this experiment we now have the values returned by analogRead() and can use them in a switch… case function or other decision-making functions in our sketches to read button(s) and make decisions based on the user input. Unfortunately there was some overlap with the returned values and therefore in some cases not every possible combination of press will be available.

However, we’re still doing well and you can get at least eleven or twelve combinations still with only one analog input pin. You can add delay() functions in your sketch if necessary to take care of switch debouncing or do it with hardware if you feel it is necessary.

So now you have a more useful method for receiving input via buttons without wasting many digital input pins. I hope you found this article useful or at least interesting. This series of tutorials has been going for almost two years now, and may soon start to wind down – it’s time to move forward to the next series of tutorials.

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Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, education, electronics, learning electronics, lesson, multiple buttons, tutorialComments (7)

Project – Single button combination lock

Time for something different  – a single button combination lock. Allow me to explain…

Updated 18/03/2013

Normally a combination lock would require the entry of a series of unique numbers in order to unlock something or start an action. For example:

800px-masterpadlock

(image information)

A more contemporary type of lock could be controlled electronically, for example by a keypad where the user enters a series of digits to cause something to happen. Such as the keypad on this dodgy $30 safe from Officeworks:

As you can see there is a button for each digit. You would think that this would be a good idea –  however people can watch you enter the digits, or users can be silly enough to write down the combination somewhere. In some cases the more cunning monkeys have even placed cameras that can observe keypads to record people entering the combination. There must be a better way. Possibly! However in the meanwhile you can consider my idea instead – just have one button. Only one button – and the combination is made up of the time that elapses between presses of the button. There are many uses for such an odd lock:

  • A type of combination lock that controls an electric door strike, or activates a device of some sort;
  • A way of testing mind-hand coordination for skill, or the base of a painfully frustrating game;
  • Perhaps an interlock on motor vehicle to prevent drink driving. After a few drinks there’s no way you could get the timing right. Then again, after a double espresso or two you might have problems as well.
How does it work? Consider the following:

We measure the duration of time between each press of the button (in this case – delay 1~4). These delay times are then compared against values stored in the program that controls the lock. It is also prudent to allow for some tolerance in the user’s press delay – say plus or minus ten to fifteen percent. We are not concerned with the duration of each button press, however it is certainly feasible.

To create this piece of hardware is quite easy, and once again we will use the Arduino way of doing things. For prototyping and experimenting it is simple enough to create with a typical board such as a Uno or Eleven and a solderless breadboard – however to create a final product you could minimise it by using a bare-bones solution (as described here). Now let’s get started…

For demonstration purposes we have a normally-open button connected to digital pin 2 on our Arduino-compatible board using the 10k ohm pull down resistor as such:

democircuit

The next thing to do is determine our delay time values. Our example will use five presses, so we measure four delays. With the following sketch, you can generate the delay data by pushing the button yourself – the sketch will return the delay times on the serial monitor:

So what’s going on the this sketch? Each time the button is pressed a reading of millis() is taken and stored in an array. [More on millis() in the tutorial]. Once the button has been pressed five times, the difference in time between each press is calculated and stored in the array del[]. Note the use of a 500 ms delay in the function dataCapture(), this is to prevent the button bouncing and will need to be altered to suit your particular button. Finally the delay data is then displayed on the serial monitor. For example:

The example was an attempt to count one second between each press. This example also illustrates the need to incorporate some tolerance in the actual lock sketch. With a tolerance of +/- 10% and delay values of one second, the lock would activate. With 5% – no. Etcetera.

Now for the lock sketch. Again it measures the millis() value on each button press and after five presses calculates the duration between each press. Finally in the function checkCombination() the durations are compared against the stored delay values (generated using the first sketch) which are stored in the array del[]. In our example lock sketch we have values of one second between each button press. The tolerance is stored as a decimal fraction in the variable tolerance; for example to have a tolerance of ten percent, use 0.1:

When choosing your time delays, ensure they are larger than the value used for button debounce (the delay() function call) in the dataCapture() function. Notice the two functions success() and failure() – these will contain the results of what happens when the user successfully enters the combination or does not. For a demonstration of the final product, I have connected an LCD to display the outcomes of the entry attempts. You can download the sketch from here. The key used in this example is 1,2,3,4 seconds:

Although there are four buttons on the board used in the video, only one is used. Well I hope someone out there found this interesting or slightly useful…

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, combination lock, education, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, millis, projects, tutorial, twitterComments (6)

Kit review: Freetronics 16×2 LCD Arduino Shield

Hello everyone

This kit has now been discontinued, however Freetronics now have a great LCD+Keypad Shield.

Today we examine their latest kit, the “16×2 LCD Arduino Shield“. This is a very easy to construct, yet useful tool for those experimenting, prototyping and generally making things with their Arduino-based systems.  The purpose of the shield is to offer easy access to a 16 x 2 character LCD module, and also the use of five buttons – connected to an analog input using the resistor ladder method. The kit comes packaged very well, and includes not only detailed printed instructions in colour, but also the full circuit schematic:

contentsss

It is nice to see such a high level of documentation, even though most people may not need it – there is generally someone who does. Sparkfun – get the hint. All the parts are included, and for the first time in my life the resistors were labelled as well:

partsss1

So being Mr Pedantic I followed the instructions, and happily had the components in without any troubles. The next step was the Arduino shield pins – the best way to solder these is to insert into your Arduino board, drop the shield on top then solder away as such:

shieldpinsss

And finally, bolting on the LCD whilst keeping the header pins for the LCD in line. Some people may find the bolt closest to D0 interferes with the shield pin, so you can insert the bolt upside down as I have. Remember to not solder the LCD pins until you are happy it is seated in correctly:

lcdtopcbss

Once you are satisfied the pins are lined up and sitting in their required position – solder them in, tighten your nuts and that’s it:

finishedss

The contrast of the LCD in real life is better than shown in the photo above – photographing them is a little difficult for me. However once assembled, using the shield is quite easy. If your LCD doesn’t seem to be working after your first sketch, adjust the contrast using the potentiometer. The LCD is a standard HD44780-interface model, and wired in to use a 4-bit parallel data interface. If using these types of LCD is new to you, perhaps visit this article then return. Our shield uses the pins: A0 and D4~D9.

One uses the standard Arduino liquidCrystal library with this LCD, and the function parameters to use are as follows:

The buttons are read using analog pin A0. Use the following sketch to find the values returned by the analogRead function:

and a quick video of this in action:

Now that we know the values returned for each button, we can take advantage of them to create, for example, a type of menu system – or some sort of controller. In the second example, we have used a modified TwentyTen with a DS1307 real-time clock IC to make a digital clock. The buttons on the LCD shield are utilised to create a user-friendly menu to set the clock time.

You can download the demonstration sketch from here.

In general this is an excellent kit, and considering the price of doing it yourself – good value as well. To get your hands on this product in kit or assembled form – visit Freetronics’ website, or your local reseller.

Remember, if you have any questions about these modules please contact Freetronics via their website. Higher resolution images available on flickr.

[Note – the kit assembled in this article was received from Freetronics for review purposes]

Posted in arduino, kit review, LCDComments (6)

Tutorial: Using analog input for multiple buttons

Use multiple buttons with one analog input in chapter twenty-five of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe.

[Updated 14/03/2013]

The purpose of this article is demonstrate how you can read many push buttons (used for user-input) using only one analog input pin. This will allow you to save digital I/O pins for other uses such as LCD modules and so on. Hopefully you recall how we used analogRead() in chapter one, and how we used a potentiometer to control menu options in exercise 10.1. For this article, we will be looking at reading individual presses, not simultaneous (i.e. detecting multiple button presses).

To recap, an analog input pin is connected to an analog to digital (ADC) converter in our Arduino’s microcontroller. It has a ten bit resolution, and can return a numerical value between 0 and 1023 which relates to an analog voltage being read of between 0 and 5 volts DC. With the following sketch:

and in the following short video, we have demonstrated the possible values returned by measuring the voltage from the centre pin of a 10k ohm potentiometer, which is connected between 5V and GND:

As the potentiometer’s resistance decreases, the value returned by analogRead() increases. Therefore at certain resistance values, analogRead() will return certain numerical values. So, if we created a circuit with (for example) five buttons that allowed various voltages to be read by an analog pin, each voltage read would cause analogRead() to return a particular value. And thus we can read the status of a number of buttons using one analog pin. The following circuit is an example of using five buttons on one analog input, using the sketch from example 25.1:

example25p2

And here it is in action:

Where is the current coming from? Using pinMode(A5, INPUT_PULLUP); turns on the internal pull-up resistor in the microcontroller, which gives us ~4.8V to use. Some of you may have notice that when the right-most button is pressed, there is a direct short between A5 and GND. When that button is depressed, the current flow is less than one milliamp due to the pull-up resistor protecting us from a short circuit. Also note that you don’t have to use A5, any analog pin is fine.

As shown in the previous video clip, the values returned by analogRead() were:

  • 1023 for nothing pressed (default state)
  • 454 for button one
  • 382 for button two
  • 291 for button three
  • 168 for button four
  • 0 for button five

So for our sketches to react to the various button presses, they need to make decisions based on the value returned by analogRead(). Keeping all the resistors at the same value gives us a pretty fair spread between values, however the values can change slightly due to the tolerance of resistors and parasitic resistance in the circuit.

So after making a prototype circuit, you should determine the values for each button, and then have your sketch look at a range of values when reading the analog pin. Doing so becomes more important if you are producing more than one of your project, as resistors of the same value from the same batch can still vary slightly. Using the circuit from example 25.2, we will use a function to read the buttons and return the button number for the sketch to act upon:

And now our video demonstration:

So now you have a useful method for receiving input via buttons without wasting many digital input pins. I hope you found this article useful or at least interesting.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in analog, arduino, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, multiple buttons, tutorialComments (9)


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