Tag Archive | "capture"

Visualise microcontroller data with Megunolink Pro

Introduction

When the time comes to capture data from a microcontroller-based project, or control an embedded project via a PC – the thought of writing the appropriate PC software can give some people a headache. Or if you’re an Arduino or other development board user and are frustrated with the Serial Monitor box – where do you go? These problems and many more can be solved by using the Megunolink Pro software that’s the subject of this review.

From the Megunolink website,

MegunoLink Pro is a tool designed to aid embedded electronics designers. MegunoLink provides a set of tools to help visualize serial data, it is made up of a set of visualizers that each have a unique function and any number of them can be utilized at once. With these visualizers and our functional tabbed and docked interface you can create a full control center for your embedded project. Plot, log and monitor serial streams from both hardwired, bluetooth, and network based (UDP) devices.

The user interface allows for a completely customized layout with many different visualisers displaying information at once. Perfect for developing exciting new microcontroller based designs. Data streams go from hard to follow serial messages to easy to interpret tables and interactive plots. The interface panel allows you to set up custom GUI elements that let you take control of your device from the comfort of your PC screen.

Phil from Megunolink gives us a quick demonstration in the following video:

Installation

Getting Megunolink running takes around ten minutes. You’ll need a recent PC running Windows of some variety (XP/ 2003/Vista/Win7/8) and also .NET Framework v4.0. You can download a trial Pro version which operates for seven days – at which point you can use the “lite” version or purchase a Pro license. The Megunolink team have given our readers a discount on the personal version, use the coupon code “TROMLP” for 30% off.

Operation

Using Megunolink is quite simple, even though there’s a whole pile of functions. From the home page there’s a variety of documentation for all of the software features, so you can get started very quickly. You can simply capture all output from the serial line and have it saved to a text file (and with a time/date stamp, which removes the need for a RTC in the hardware) – something which seems quite simple but not done with the Arduino IDE:

rtccapture

Furthermore there is an “upload monitor” in Megunolink – which can automatically disconnect from the COM: port used by an Arduino when you need to upload a new sketch, then reconnect afterward. This saves a lot of to-and-fro between the two programs when adjusting code.

The key to analysing data from the microcontroller is to insert text notes in the serial output, which are then interpreted by Megunolink for display purposes. For example, if you have your MCU code send labels with the data, Megunolink can then sort these out into channels and graph the data, for example:

timeplot_screencapture

An example Arduino sketch is provided to demonstrate this, and it translates to other development platforms. Another great feature is the ability to create a graphical user interface for projects connected to the PCB. You design the GUI which can include buttons, sliders and numeric fields, for example:

controls

… and each of which send values of your choice to the device via USB. Then it’s a simple matter of coding your device to respond to the serial commands.

Real-time mapping

As mentioned in the video above, there’s also mapping support – your hardware sends GPS coordinates and they’re displayed in a real-time window:

mapping

Arduino programming

There’s also an interface to allow programming of an Arduino with .hex files via Megunolink. Currently it can work with the ATmega328, -2560, and with an external programmer -328P and -644 microcontrollers.

Conclusion

Once again Megunolink has proven to be a useful piece of software. It gives you a friendly and powerful connection to all the data from your microcontroller, and also a simple GUI for control via serial. So test it for yourself, it won’t cost you anything for the trial version. And if you like it – don’t forget about the tronixstuff.com discount on the personal version – use the coupon code “TROMLP” for 30% off. Finally, if you have any questions please contact Megunolink. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

[Note – Megunolink Pro software license was a promotional consideration]

 

Posted in arduino, data, data analysis, graphing, mapping, megunolink, review, software, software review, tronixstuffComments (2)

Improving Arduino to PC Interactions with MegunoLink

Introduction

Through a colleague I was introduced to a new piece of software for the Windows environment which comprises of useful tools that interact with an Arduino-style board (or other MCU with serial data). The software is called MegunoLink, from BlueLeafSoftware in New Zealand. Megunolink has many useful features, and we’ll run through them briefly in this article. They include:

  • Serial port monitoring – that doesn’t reset the MCU
  • The ability to capture serial port data to a text file
  • A tool to graph formatted data sent from the Arduino in real time
  • “George” the serial monkey! (see below)
  • Enable building Arduino projects using ATMEL AVRstudio
  • And Megunolink can also act as a graphical interface for AVRdude to upload compiled code to an Arduino

Installation was simple and straightforward. The installation is only ~1.5 megabytes and not taxing at all. We only have a Windows 7 64-bit machine, so haven’t tested this in emulation under MacOS or Linux. Before moving ahead, note that the software is free. However the developers do ask for a US$10 donation, and if you use the software more than once this is a very fair amount to pay for such a featured piece of software. Now for a look at each of the features.

Serial Data monitoring

As with the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE, you can monitor the data from the Arduino, and also send it back through the serial line. Just click the ‘Monitor’ tab and you’re set, for example:

However unlike the Arduino IDE, opening the monitor does not reset the Arduino. But if you do need to perform a reset, a button on the toolbar is provided as shown below:

Capturing Serial Data to a file

Very useful indeed, much quicker than dumping data to a microSD card and then bringing it back to the PC. Just click the ‘Log’ tab, specify a file location and name, then click ‘Enabled’, for example:

You can also append data to an existing text file. When creating the output format in your Arduino sketch, be mindful to have separators such as commas or colons – which make it much easier to delimit the data once imported into a spreadsheet or database application.

Plotting and Graphing Serial Data

Plotting data to a graph is very simple. You simply format the data you’d like to plot using Serial.write commands, and Megunolink takes care of the rest – just click the ‘Plotter’ tab and you’re off.  The data must be formatted as such:

Where ‘a’ is the name of the series. T tells MegunoLink to plot the actual real time, and b is the data as a number in string form. Here is a very simple example:

which resulted with:

Here is another example, it is the “SendSineCurve” sketch from the Arduino Graphing library:

You can always save the graph as an image in the usual formats as well as in .emf vector image file format.

“George” the Serial Monkey

This is a serial protocol simulator tool which is useful for testing the control of serial-based devices. You can setup George so that it listens for a particular pattern in the serial output from an Arduino – and then sends back a response of your choice to the Arduino. For example:

For a more detail explanation and detail tutorial on how to control George, see the MegunoLink website.

Arduino Development with AVR Studio 

Using MegunoLink you can develop Arduino projects with Atmel AVRStudio software. As some people find the Arduino IDE somewhat limiting, this option gives you access to the more programmer-friendly Atmel IDE, for example:

Although there is a small amount of tasks to make this possible, it is straightforward to do so, and an easy to follow tutorial has been provided at the MegunoLink website.

Upload compiled .HEX files to Arduino

For those using avrdude to upload compiled .hex files to an Ardiuno, you can also do this using the GUI MegunoLink interface. This is also used for uploading the compiled files generated in AVRStudio, for example:

As with all the other MegunoLink features – there is a relevant tutorial available on the website.

Conclusion

MegunoLink works well, is easy to use, and the price is right. It has to be the simplest tool available for plotting data from a microcontroller, or capturing it to a file without any extra hardware. So download it and give it a try, it won’t cost you anything and I’m sure you will find a use for it in the near future. And remember – if you’re using MegunoLink, please consider making a donation towards the development of further versions. Thanks to Freetronics for the use of their top-notch Arduino-compatible hardware.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, data analysis, megunolink, software review, tutorialComments (9)

Kit Review – Snootlab Mémoire SD card/RTC/prototyping shield

Hello Readers

In this article we will examine another product from a bundle sent for review by Snootlab, a Toulouse, France-based company that in their own words:

… designs and develops electronic products with an Open Hardware and Open Source approach. We are particularly specialized in the design of new shields for Arduino. The products we create are licensed under CC BY-SA v3.0 (as shown in documents associated with each of our creations). In accordance with the principles of the definition of Open Source Hardware (OSHW), we have signed it the 10th February 2011. We wish to contribute to the development of the ecosystem of “do it yourself” through original designs of products, uses and events.

Furthermore, all of their products are RoHS compliant and as part of the Open Hardware commitment, all the design files are available from the Snootlab website.

The subject of the review is the Snootlab Mémoire – an SD card data logging shield with on-board DS1307 real time clock [and matching backup battery] and prototyping area. It uses the standard SdFat library to write to normal SD memory cards formatted in FAT16 or FAT32. You can download the library from here. The real time clock IC is an easy to use I2C-interface model, and I have documented its use in great detail in this tutorial.

Once again, shield assembly is simple and quite straightforward. You can download an illustrated assembly guide from here, however it is in French. But everything you need to know is laid out on the PCB silk-screen, or the last page of the instructions. The it arrives in a reusable ESD bag:

… and all the required parts are included – including an IC socket and the RTC backup battery:

… the PCB is thick, with a very detailed silk-screen. Furthermore, it arrives with the SD card and 3.3V LDO (underneath) already pre-soldered – a nice touch:

The order of soldering the components is generally a subjective decision, and in this case I started with the resistors:

… and then worked my way out, but not fitting the battery nor IC until last. Intrestingly, the instructions require the crystal to be tacked down with some solder onto the PCB. Frankly I didn’t think it would withstand the temperature, however it did and all is well:

Which leaves us with a fully-assembled Mémoire shield ready for action:

Please note that a memory card is not included with the kit. If you are following along with your own Mémoire, the first thing to do after inserting the battery, IC and shield into your Arduino board and run some tests to ensure all is well. First thing is to test the DS1307 real-time clock IC. You can use the following sketch from chapter seven of my Arduino tutorial series:

If you are unsure about using I2C, please review my tutorial which can be found here. Don’t forget to update the time and date data in void setup(), and also comment out the setDateDS1307() function and upload the sketch a second time. The sketch output will be found on the serial monitor box – such as:

rtcdemooutput

Those of you familiar with the DS1307 RTC IC know that it can generate a nice 1 Hz pulse. To take advantage of this the SQW pin has an access hole on the PCB, beetween R10 and pin 8 of the IC:

For instruction on how to activate the SQW output, please visit the last section of this tutorial.

The next test is the SD card section of the shield. If you have not already done so, download and install the SdFat libary. Then, in the Arduino IDE, select File > Examples > SdFat > SdFatInfo. Insert the formatted (FAT16/32) SD card into the shield, upload the sketch, then open the serial monitor. You should be presented with something like this:

sdcardinfo

As you can see the sketch has returned various data about the SD card. Finally, let’s log some data. You can deconstruct the excellent example that comes with the SdFat library titled SdFatAnalogLogger (select File > Examples > SdFat > SdFatAnalogLogger). Using the functions:

you can “write” to the SD card in the same way as you would the serial output (that is, the serial monitor).

If you have reached this far without any errors – Congratulations! You’re ready to log. If not, remove the battery, SD card and IC from your shield (you used the IC socket, didn’t you?). Check the polarised components are in correctly, double-check your soldering and then reinsert the IC, shield and battery and try again. If that fails, support is available on the Snootlab website, and there is also a customer forum in French (use Google Translate). However as noted previously the team at Snootlab converse in excellent English and have been easy to contact via email if you have any questions. Stay tuned for the final Snootlab product review.

Snootlab products including the Snootlab Mémoire are available directly from their website. High-resolution images available on flickr.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow on twitterfacebook, or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the products reviewed in this article are promotional considerations made available by Snootlab]

Posted in arduino, ds1307, education, kit review, snootlabComments (0)


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