Tag Archive | "cheap"

The world’s smallest oscilloscope??

Hello readers

Today we examine a tiny and fascinating piece of test equipment from Gabotronics – their XMEGA Xprotolab. Sure, that sounds like a lot – and it is. Yet the functionality of the Xprotolab is inversely proportional to its physical size. Try to imagine having an oscilloscope, arbitrary waveform generator, logic analyser and a spectrum analyser – including a display – in a package no larger than 25.4 x 40.6 mm (1″ x 1.6″) in size. Well imagine no more as here it is:

1ss

As described above, this tiny marvel of engineering has the following functions:

  • Two analogue oscilloscope channels with a maximum sampling rate of 2 million samples per second;
  • Analogue bandwidth of 320 kHz at 8-bits resolution;
  • Buffer size of 256 samples;
  • Fast fourier-transform;
  • Analog and external digital triggering;
  • Maximum input voltage of +/- 10V;
  • Automatic average and peak-to-peak measurements;
  • Logic analyser with eight channel maximum simultaneous monitoring;
  • Firmware is user upgradable;
  • Can also be used as a development board for the XMEGA microcontroller (extra items required);
  • When powered from a USB cable, the board can supply +/-5V and +3.3V into a solderless breadboard.

The OLED screen is very clear and precise, which considering the size of 0.96″ – very easy to read. One can also set the display mode to invert which changes the display to black on white, bringing back memories of the original Apple Macintosh:

invertedss

Using the Xprotolab took a little getting used to, however after pressing menu buttons for a few minutes I had it worked out. The more sensible among you will no doubt read the instructions and menu map listed at the website. Having the dual voltmeter function is quite useful, it saved me having to mess about with a couple of multimeters when trying to debug some analogue circuits I’m currently working with.

The display can be as complex or as simple as you choose, for example when working with the oscilloscope you can disable one channel and shift the waveform so it occupies the centre of the screen. Or when working with the logic analyser, you can choose to only select the channels being monitored, instead of filling the screen with unused logic lines.

There are a couple of things to take care with. When inserting the Xprotolab into your breadboard, be careful not to put pressure on the OLED display when pushing down; when removing it from the breadboard, try and do so evenly with the help of an DIP IC puller.

Generally in my reviews there is a video clip of something happening. Unfortunately my camera just isn’t that good, so below is the demonstration clip from the manufacturer:

As you can see the Xprotolab would be quite useful for monitoring various signals whilst prototyping, as you can just drop it into a breadboard. Furthermore, if your required range is measurable the Xprotolab saves you having to look back-and-forth between a prototype and the display from a regular oscilloscope as well.

As the purchase price is relatively cheap compared against the time and effort of trying to make an OLED display board yourself, one could also plan to build an Xprotolab into a final design – considering a lot of measurement and display work is already done for you it could be a real time-saver. The Xprotolab can run from a 5V supply and only draws a maximum of 60 milliamps. Product support is quite extensive, including source code, schematics, videos, a user forum and more available from the product page.

In conclusion the Xprotolab is genuinely useful, inexpensive and ready to use out of the box. It would make a useful piece of test equipment for a beginner or seasoned professional, and also integrates well into custom projects when required.

Remember, if you have any questions about the Xprotolab,  please contact Gabotronics via their website.

[Note – the Xprotolab reviewed in this article was received from Gabotronics for review purposes]

Posted in gabotronics, oscilloscope, part review, review, xmega, xprotolabComments (8)

Tutorial: Arduino and Colour LCD

Learn how to use the colour LCD shield from Sparkfun in chapter twenty-eight of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 19/02/2013

Although there are many colour LCDs on the market, I’ve chosen a relatively simple and popular model to examine in this tutorial – the Sparkfun Color LCD shield:

If you buy one note (shown above) that stacking headers aren’t supplied or fitted to the shield. If you get a header pack from Sparkfun or elsewhere – order PRT-10007 not PRT-11417 as the LCD shield doesn’t have the extra holes for R3 Arduino boards. However if you do have an Arduino R3 – relax … the shield works. While we’re on the subject of pins – this shield uses D3~D5 for the three buttons, and D8, 9, 11 and 13 for the LCD interface. The shield takes 5V and doesn’t require any external power for the backlight. The LCD unit is 128 x 128 pixels, with nine defined colours (red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink) as well as black and white.

So let’s get started. From a software perspective, the first thing to do is download and install the library for the LCD shield. Visit the library page here. Then download the .zip file, extract and copy the resulting folder into your ..\arduino-1.0.x\libraries folder. Then restart the Arduino IDE if it was already open.

At this point let’s check the shield is working before moving forward. Fit it to your Arduino – making sure the shield doesn’t make contact with the USB socket**. Then open the Arduino IDE and upload the TestPattern sketch found in the Examples folder. You should be presented with a nice test pattern as such:

It’s difficult to photograph the LCD – (some of them have very bright backlights), so the image may not be a true reflection of reality. Nevertheless this shield is easy to use and we will prove this in the following examples.

At the start of every sketch, you will need the following lines:

as well as the following in void setup():

With regards to lcd.init(), try it first without a parameter. If the screen doesn’t work, try PHILIPS or EPSON instead. There are two versions of the LCD shield floating about each with a different controller chip. The contrast parameter is subjective, however 63 looks good – but test for yourself. Now let’s move on to examine each function with a small example, then use the LCD shield in more complex applications.

The LCD can display 8 rows of 16 characters of text. The function to display text is:

where x and y are the coordinates of the top left pixel of the first character in the string. Another necessary function is:

Which clears the screen and sets the background colour to the parameter colour.  Please note – when referring to the X- and Y-axis in this article, they are relative to the LCD in the position shown below. Now for an example – to recreate the following display:

… use the following sketch:

In example 28.1 we used the function lcd.clear(), which unsurprisingly cleared the screen and set the background a certain colour. Let’s have a look at the various background colours in the following example. The lcd.clear()  function is helpful as it can set the entire screen area to a particular colour. As mentioned earlier, there are the predefined colours red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink, as well as black and white. Here they are in the following example:

And now to see it in action. The colours are more livid in real life, unfortunately the camera does not capture them so well.

Now that we have had some experience with the LCD library’s functions, we can move on to drawing some graphical objects. Recall that the screen has a resolution of 128 by 128 pixels. We have four functions to make use of this LCD real estate, so let’s see how they work. The first is:

This functions places a pixel (one LCD dot) at location x, y with the colour of colour.

Note – in this (and all the functions that have a colour parameter) you can substitute the colour (e.g. BLACK) for a 12-bit RGB value representing the colour required. 

Next is:

Which draws a line of colour COLOUR, from position x0, y0 to x1, y1. Our next function is:

This function draws an oblong or square of colour COLOUR with the top-left point at x0, y0 and the bottom right at x1, y1. Fill is set to 0 for an outline, and 1 for a filled oblong. It would be convenient for drawing bar graphs for data representation. And finally, we can also create circles, using:

X and Y is the location for the centre of the circle, radius and COLOUR are self-explanatory. We will now use these graphical functions in the following demonstration sketch:

You can see Example 28.3  in the following video. (There’s a section in  the video showing semi-circles – however this isn’t possible with the new Arduino v1+ library).  For photographic reasons, I will stick with white on black for the colours.

So now you have an explanation of the functions to drive the screen – and only your imagination is holding you back.  ** Get an Eleven board – it has a microUSB socket so you don’t run the risk of rubbing against shields. For another example of the colour LCD shield in use, check out my version of “Tic-tac-toe“.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, education, LCD, LCD-09363, lesson, microcontrollers, tutorialComments (3)

Project – Simple RFID access system

In this tutorial you can make an RFID access system. It’s very simple and can be used with a wide variety of end-uses.

Updated 18/03/2013

The purpose of this project is to prototype a basic RFID access system. Although it is not that complicated, this article is my response to a kit reviewed in the Australian “Silicon Chip” (November 2010) electronics magazine. Their article describes the kit in detail – operation, schematic, use and installation. However the code for the microcontroller (PIC16F628A)  is not published due to the kit manufacturer holding copyright over the design.

This is a shame, as many organisations have been quite successful selling open-source kits. So instead of moaning about it, I have created my own design that matches the operation of the original, instead using the ATmega328 MCU with Arduino bootloader. Consider this a basic framework that you can modify for your own access system, or the start of something more involved.

articless

There are pros and cons with the original vs. my version. The biggest pro is that you can buy the whole kit for around Au$40 including a nice PCB, solder it together, and it works. However if you want to do it yourself, you can modify it to no end, and have some fun learning and experimenting along the way. So let’s go!

The feature requirements are few. The system must be able to learn and remember up to eight RFID access tags/cards, etc – which must be able to be altered by a non-technical user. Upon reading a card, the system will activate a relay for a period of time (say 1 second) to allow operation of a door strike or electric lock. Finally, the RFID tag serial numbers are to be stored in an EEPROM in case of a power outage. When a tag is read, a matching LED (1~8) will show which tag was read. There are also two LEDs, called “Go” and “Stop” which show the activation status. The original kit has some more LEDs, which I have made superfluous by blinking existing LEDs.

This is a simple thing to make, and the transition from a solderless breadboard to strip board will be easy for those who decide to make a permanent example. But for now, you can follow with the prototype. First is the parts list:

  • Atmel ATmega328 with Arduino bootloader;
  • 16 MHz resonator (X1 in schematic);
  • ten LEDs of your choice;
  • two normally-open push buttons;
  • two 560 ohm resistors (all resistors 1/4 watt);
  • one 1k ohm resistor;
  • three 10k ohm resistors;
  • one BC548 transistor;
  • three 0.01 uF monolithic capacitors;
  • one 100 uF electrolytic capacitor;
  • one 1N4004 diode;
  • Microchip 24LC256 EEPROM;
  • 125 kHZ RFID module;
  • 125 kHz RFID tags/cards;
  • connecting wire;
  • large solderless breadboard;
  • LM7805 power regulator;
  • relay of your choice with 5V coil (example).

When selecting a relay, make sure it can handle the required load current and voltage – and that the coil current is less than 100mA.

If attempting to switch mains voltage/current – contact a licensed electrician. Your life is worth more than the money saved by not consulting an expert.

And here is the schematic (large version):

simplerfidschematic

Here is the prototype on the solderless breadboard. For demonstration purposes an LED has been substituted for the transistor/relay section of the circuit, the power regulator circuitry has not been shown, and there are superfluous 4.7k resistors on the I2C bus. To program the software (Arduino sketch) the easiest way is by inserting the target IC into an Arduino-compatible board, or via a 5V FTDI cable and a basic circuit as described here.

rfidbboardss

The Arduino sketch is also quite simple. The main loop calls the procedure readTags() to process any RFID tag read attempts, and then monitors button A – if pressed, the function learnTags() is called to allow memorisation of new RFID tags. Each tag serial number consists of 14 decimal numbers, and these are stored in the EEPROM sequentially. That is, the first tag’s serial number occupies memory positions 0~13, the second tag’s serial number occupies memory position 14~28, and so on. Two functions are used to read and write tag serial numbers to the EEPROM – readEEPROMtag() and writeEEPROMtag().

The EEPROM is controlled via the I2C bus. For a tutorial about Arduino, I2C bus and the EEPROM please read this article. For a tutorial about Arduino and RFID, please read this article. The rest of the sketch is pretty self-explanatory. Just follow it along and you can see how it works. You can download the sketch from hereAnd finally, a quick video demonstration:

So there you have it. I hope you enjoyed reading about this small project and perhaps gained some use for it of your own or sparked some other ideas in your imagination that you can turn into reality.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in hardware hacking, learning electronics, microcontrollers, projects, RDM630, RDM6300, rfidComments (12)

Kit review: Freetronics 16×2 LCD Arduino Shield

Hello everyone

This kit has now been discontinued, however Freetronics now have a great LCD+Keypad Shield.

Today we examine their latest kit, the “16×2 LCD Arduino Shield“. This is a very easy to construct, yet useful tool for those experimenting, prototyping and generally making things with their Arduino-based systems.  The purpose of the shield is to offer easy access to a 16 x 2 character LCD module, and also the use of five buttons – connected to an analog input using the resistor ladder method. The kit comes packaged very well, and includes not only detailed printed instructions in colour, but also the full circuit schematic:

contentsss

It is nice to see such a high level of documentation, even though most people may not need it – there is generally someone who does. Sparkfun – get the hint. All the parts are included, and for the first time in my life the resistors were labelled as well:

partsss1

So being Mr Pedantic I followed the instructions, and happily had the components in without any troubles. The next step was the Arduino shield pins – the best way to solder these is to insert into your Arduino board, drop the shield on top then solder away as such:

shieldpinsss

And finally, bolting on the LCD whilst keeping the header pins for the LCD in line. Some people may find the bolt closest to D0 interferes with the shield pin, so you can insert the bolt upside down as I have. Remember to not solder the LCD pins until you are happy it is seated in correctly:

lcdtopcbss

Once you are satisfied the pins are lined up and sitting in their required position – solder them in, tighten your nuts and that’s it:

finishedss

The contrast of the LCD in real life is better than shown in the photo above – photographing them is a little difficult for me. However once assembled, using the shield is quite easy. If your LCD doesn’t seem to be working after your first sketch, adjust the contrast using the potentiometer. The LCD is a standard HD44780-interface model, and wired in to use a 4-bit parallel data interface. If using these types of LCD is new to you, perhaps visit this article then return. Our shield uses the pins: A0 and D4~D9.

One uses the standard Arduino liquidCrystal library with this LCD, and the function parameters to use are as follows:

The buttons are read using analog pin A0. Use the following sketch to find the values returned by the analogRead function:

and a quick video of this in action:

Now that we know the values returned for each button, we can take advantage of them to create, for example, a type of menu system – or some sort of controller. In the second example, we have used a modified TwentyTen with a DS1307 real-time clock IC to make a digital clock. The buttons on the LCD shield are utilised to create a user-friendly menu to set the clock time.

You can download the demonstration sketch from here.

In general this is an excellent kit, and considering the price of doing it yourself – good value as well. To get your hands on this product in kit or assembled form – visit Freetronics’ website, or your local reseller.

Remember, if you have any questions about these modules please contact Freetronics via their website. Higher resolution images available on flickr.

[Note – the kit assembled in this article was received from Freetronics for review purposes]

Posted in arduino, kit review, LCDComments (6)

Breaking up an automatic room deodoriser – round two

Again we attempt to break down an automatic room deodoriser.

Updated 18/03/2013

Today we are going to tear down another automatic room deodoriser. Why? Well the first attempt beat me, so it was time to even the score and try again with another type. The supermarket had the following units for $7.99, which seemed a little too cheap:

brandnewss1

The “satisfaction guarantee” gave me a chuckle, the thought of writing to SC Johnson complaining that their products were not that hackable would be interesting. But would it be hackable at all? Let’s find out. The packaging promises a squirt of scent when the unit detects motion, then holds out for 30 minutes until the next release. The word motion hints that there would be a PIR inside the unit. However the instructions mention that the unit does not work that well in dark or bright rooms – which is odd, as PIRs usually work in the dark. Hmm. This unit is somewhat smaller than the previous attempt, yet still offers us a pair of alkaline AA cells:

insidess

Moving on, time to start the disassembly process. The rear shows four screws, easily removed:

backss

revealing the fun things:

gearsss

The motor drive is reduced twice, which then has a geared arm which causes the vertical motion to pressure the cylinder to release the scent. The whole mess of gears was lubricated generously, the whole lot literally came out with the touch of a finger. Removing the gears and goop reveals the motor and control boards, which clipped out easily:

motorpcbss

Interesting – a labelled motor. Very good, what looks like to be a 3V DC motor. The control board is made up of two PCBs, a smaller module that holds a control IC of some sort, and the larger, lesser-densely populated board with the button, status LED and “motion detector”. Let’s have a close-up of that PCB:

pcbaloness

So we have the button, which causes the motor to run; a yellow LED which blinks once every five seconds; and out motion detector in the black casing. The motion detector seemed rather familiar, so I removed the black housing around it with some pliers, which revealed this:

lightsensorss

Huh – that looks just like an LED. The metal object inside the clear casing was even identical to what you would see inside an LED. However, foolishly I broke it off the PCB when removing the housing, so could not get any voltage to it. From reading the instructions earlier on – that mention the light/dark issue, causes me to ponder if this is some sort of light-dependent sensor?

No – it is a photodiode! However the motor looked quite worthwhile. Curious to see what is driving it, I hooked up Mr Fluke to see what happens:

No surprises there, almost three volts DC forward voltage. After applying forward current the circuit applies a quick reverse current to release, thereby causing the gears and arm to ‘squeeze’ down on the scent cylinder. So now we have a circuit board that runs on 3V, which can output 3V for a few seconds every 30 minutes – or at the press of a button.

With regards to current, another measurement was taken:


When free-running, the motor draws around 45 milliamps – and the stall current (that is, the current drawn when I force the spindle to stop) is around 675 milliamps. That is quite a strong little motor, and worth the effort. In general, this has been a good tear down, we scored some AA cells, a good motor and gears, some stink spray, and a timing circuit that could have uses elsewhere. So overall a win – the score has evened with the deodoriser world! High resolution photos available on flickr.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in electronics, hardware hacking, room deoderiser, tutorialComments (4)


Subscribe via email

Receive notifications of new posts by email.

The Arduino Book

Arduino Workshop

Für unsere deutschen Freunde

Dla naszych polskich przyjaciół ...

Australian Electronics!

Buy and support Silicon Chip - Australia's only Electronics Magazine.

Use of our content…

%d bloggers like this: