Tag Archive | "data"

Online data analysis with Arduino and plotly

Introduction

It’s 2014 and the Internet-of-Things is flying along at a rapid rate with all sorts of services and devices that share data and allow control via the Internet. In the spirit of this we look a new service called plotly.

This is a “collaborative data analysis and graphing tool” which allows you to upload your own data to be analysed in many ways, and then graph the results using all sorts of plot types.

With plotly you can run your own mathematical functions over your data, run intense statistical analysis and use or edit one of the many APIs (PythonMATLABRJuliaRESTArduino, or Perl) to increase the level of customisation. Plotly works in conjunction with Google Drive to store your data, however this can be exported and imported without any issues. Futhermore plotly works best in Google Chrome.

For our review we’ll look at using plotly to quickly display and analyse data received from an Internet-connected Arduino – our EtherTen, or you can use almost any Arduino and Ethernet shield. The system isn’t completely documented however by revieiwng our example sketch and some experimenting with the interface plotly is very much usable, even in its current beta format.

Getting started with plotly

You will need to setup a plotly account, and this is simply accomplished from their main site. Some of you may be wondering what plotly costs – at the time of writing plotly is free for unlimited public use (that is – anyone can see your data with the right URL), but requires a subscription for extended private use. You can find the costs at the plans page.

Once you have a plotly account, visit your plotly home page, whose URL is https://plot.ly/~yourusername/# – then click “edit profile”. Another window will appear which amongst other things contains your plotly API key – make a note of this as you will need it and your username for the Arduino sketch.

Next, you’ll need some Arduino or compatible hardware to capture the data to log and analyse. An Arduino with an Ethernet or WiFi connection, and appropriate sensors for your application. We have our EtherTen that takes readings from a temperature/humidity sensor and a light level sensor:

Freetronics EtherTen Arduino Plotly

Now you need a new Arduino library, which is available from the plotly API page. Lots of APIs there… Anyhow, click “Arduino” and you will arrive at the github page. Download the entire .zip file, and extract the plotly_ethernet folder into Arduino libraries folder which in most installations can be found at ..\Arduino-1.0.x\libraries. 

plotly arduino library folder

Finally we’ll use a demonstration sketch provided by plotly and modify this to our needs, which can be downloaded from github. We’ll go through this sketch and show you what to update – so have a quick look and then at out example sketch at the end of this section.

First, insert any code required to get data from your sensors and store the data in a variable – do this so the values can be used in void loop. Next, update the MAC address and the IP address of your Ethernet-enabled Arduino with the following lines:

and change the MAC and IP if necessary. If Arduino and Ethernet is new to you, check out the tutorial. Now look for the following two lines and enter your plotly username and API key:

Next – it’s a good idea to set your time zone, so the time in plots makes sense. Add the following two lines in void setup():

You can find a list of time zones available for use with plotly here. Now you need to determine how many traces and points to use. A trace is one source of data, for example temperature. For now you will have one point, so set these parameters using the following lines:

For example, we will plot temperature, humidity and light level – so this requires three traces. The next step is to set the filename for the plot, using the following line:

This will be sent to plotly and your data will be saved under that name. At the point in your sketch where you want to send some data back to plotly, use:

… then the following for each trace:

where data is the variable to send back to plotly. We use millis() as our example is logging data against time.

To put all that together, consider our example sketch with the hardware mentioned earlier:

After wiring up the hardware and uploading the sketch, the data will be sent until the power is removed from the Arduino.

Monitoring sensor data

Now that your hardware is sending the data off to plotly, you can check it out in real time. Log into plotly and visit the data home page – https://plot.ly/plot – for example:

plotly home data page

Your data file will be listed – so just click on the file name to be presented with a very basic graph. Over time you will see it develop as the data is received, however you may want to alter the display, headings, labels and so on. Generally you can click on trace labels, titles and so on to change them, the interface is pretty intuitive after a few moments. A quick screencast of this is shown in this video.

To view and analyse the raw data – and create all sorts of custom plots, graphs and other analysis – click the “view data in grid” icon which is the second from the left along the bar:

view data grid button

At which point your data will be displayed in a new tab:

plotly arduino data grid

From this point you can experiment to your heart’s content – just don’t forget to save your work. In a short amount of time your data can be presented visually and analysed with ease:

plotly arduino data graph

Conclusion

Although plotly is still in beta form, it works well and the developers are responsive to any questions – so there isn’t much more to say but give it a try yourself, doing so won’t cost you anything and you can see how useful plotly is for yourself. And if you enjoyed this article, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop”.

visit tronixlabs.com

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in API, arduino, ethernet, plotly, tronixstuff, tutorialComments (0)

Arduino Tutorials – Chapter 16 – Ethernet

Learn how to connect your Arduino to the outside world via Ethernet

This is chapter sixteen of our huge Arduino tutorial seriesUpdated 06/12/2013

In this chapter we will introduce and examine the use of Ethernet networking with Arduino over local networks and the greater Internet. It will be assumed that you have a basic understanding of computer networking, such as the knowledge of how to connect computers to a hub/router with RJ45 cables, what an IP and MAC address is, and so on. Furthermore, here is a good quick rundown about Ethernet.

Getting Started

You will need an Arduino Uno or compatible board with an Ethernet shield that uses the W5100 Ethernet controller IC (pretty much all of them):

Arduino Ethernet shield

…or consider using a Freetronics EtherTen – as it has everything all on the one board, plus some extras:

Freetronics EtherTen

Furthermore you will need to power the board via the external DC socket – the W5100 IC uses more current than the USB power can supply. A 9V 1A plug pack/wall wart will suffice. Finally it does get hot – so be careful not to touch the W5100 after extended use. In case you’re not sure – this is the W5100 IC:

Wiznet W5100

Once you have your Ethernet-enabled Arduino, and have the external power connected – it’s a good idea to check it all works. Open the Arduino IDE and selectFile > Examples > Ethernet > Webserver. This loads a simple sketch which will display data gathered from the analogue inputs on a web browser. However don’t upload it yet, it needs a slight modification.

You need to specify the IP address of the Ethernet shield – which is done inside the sketch. This is simple, go to the line:

And alter it to match your own setup. For example, in my home the router’s IP address is 10.1.1.1, the printer is 10.1.1.50 and all PCs are below …50. So I will set my shield IP to 10.1.1.77 by altering the line to:


You also have the opportunity to change your MAC address. Each piece of networking equipment has a unique serial number to identify itself over a network, and this is normall hard-programmed into the equipments’ firmware. However with Arduino we can define the MAC address ourselves.

If you are running more than one Ethernet shield on your network, ensure they have different MAC addresses by altering the hexadecimal values in the line:


However if you only have one shield just leave it be. There may be the very, very, statistically rare chance of having a MAC address the same as your existing hardware, so that would be another time to change it.

Once you have made your alterations, save and upload the sketch. Now open a web browser and navigate to the IP address you entered in the sketch, and you should be presented with something similar to the following:

 Arduino webserver example sketch

What’s happening? The Arduino has been programmed to offer a simple web page with the values measured by the analogue inputs. You can refresh the browser to get updated values.

At this point – please note that the Ethernet shields use digital pins 10~13, so you can’t use those for anything else. Some Arduino Ethernet shields may also have a microSD card socket, which also uses another digital pin – so check with the documentation to find out which one.

Nevertheless, now that we can see the Ethernet shield is working we can move on to something more useful. Let’s dissect the previous example in a simple way, and see how we can distribute and display more interesting data over the network. For reference, all of the Ethernet-related functions are handled by the Ethernet Arduino library. If you examine the previous sketch we just used, the section that will be of interest is:

Hopefully this section of the sketch should be familiar – remember how we have used serial.print(); in the past when sending data to the serial monitor box? Well now we can do the same thing, but sending data from our Ethernet shield back to a web browser – on other words, a very basic type of web page.

However there is something you may or may not want to  learn in order to format the output in a readable format – HTML code. I am not a website developer (!) so will not delve into HTML too much.

However if you wish to serve up nicely formatted web pages with your Arduino and so on, here would be a good start. In the interests of simplicity, the following two functions will be the most useful:


Client.print (); allows us to send text or data back to the web page. It works in the same way as serial.print(), so nothing new there. You can also specify the data type in the same way as with serial.print(). Naturally you can also use it to send data back as well. The other useful line is:


which sends the HTML code back to the web browser telling it to start a new line. The part that actually causes the carriage return/new line is the <br /> which is an HTML code (or “tag”) for a new line. So if you are creating more elaborate web page displays, you can just insert other HTML tags in the client.print(); statement. If you want to learn more about HTML commands, here’s a good tutorial site. Finally – note that the sketch will only send the data when it has been requested, that is when it has received a request from the web browser.

Accessing your Arduino over the Internet

So far – so good. But what if you want to access your Arduino from outside the local network?

You will need a static IP address – that is, the IP address your internet service provider assigns to your connection needs to stay the same. If you don’t have a static IP, as long as you leave your modem/router permanently swiched on your IP shouldn’t change. However that isn’t an optimal solution.

If your ISP cannot offer you a static IP at all, you can still move forward with the project by using an organisation that offers a Dynamic DNS. These organisations offer you your own static IP host name (e.g. mojo.monkeynuts.com) instead of a number, keep track of your changing IP address and linking it to the new host name. From what I can gather, your modem needs to support (have an in-built client for…) these DDNS services. As an example, two companies are No-IP andDynDNS.com. Please note that I haven’t used those two, they are just offered as examples.

Now, to find your IP address… usually this can be found by logging into your router’s administration page – it is usually 192.168.0.1 but could be different. Check with your supplier or ISP if they supplied the hardware. For this example, if I enter 10.1.1.1 in a web browser, and after entering my modem administration password, the following screen is presented:

WAN IP address router

What you are looking for is your WAN IP address, as you can see in the image above. To keep the pranksters away, I have blacked out some of my address.

The next thing to do is turn on port-forwarding. This tells the router where to redirect incoming requests from the outside world. When the modem receives such a request, we want to send that request to the port number of our Ethernet shield. Using the:

function in our sketch has set the port number to 125. Each modem’s configuration screen will look different, but as an example here is one:

Arduino router port forwarding

So you can see from the line number one in the image above, the inbound port numbers have been set to 125, and the IP address of the Ethernet shield has been set to 10.1.1.77 – the same as in the sketch.

After saving the settings, we’re all set. The external address of my Ethernet shield will be the WAN:125, so to access the Arduino I will type my WAN address with :125 at the end into the browser of the remote web device, which will contact the lonely Ethernet hardware back home.

Furthermore, you may need to alter your modem’s firewall settings, to allow the port 125 to be “open” to incoming requests. Please check your modem documentation for more information on how to do this.

Now from basically any Internet connected device in the free world, I can enter my WAN and port number into the URL field and receive the results. For example, from a phone when it is connected to the Internet via LTE mobile data:

Arduino webserver example cellular

So at this stage you can now display data on a simple web page created by your Arduino and access it from anywhere with unrestricted Internet access. With your previous Arduino knowledge (well, this is chapter sixteen) you can now use data from sensors or other parts of a sketch and display it for retrieval.

Displaying sensor data on a web page

As an example of displaying sensor data on a web page, let’s use an inexpensive and popular temperature and humidity sensor – the DHT22. You will need to install the DHT22 Arduino library which can be found on this page. If this is your first time with the DHT22, experiment with the example sketch that’s included with the library so you understand how it works.

Connect the DHT22 with the data pin to Arduino D2, Vin to the 5V pin and GND to … GND:

arduino ethernet freetronics etherten dht22 humid

Now for our sketch – to display the temperature and humidity on a web page. If you’re not up on HTML you can use online services such as this to generate the code, which you can then modify to use in the sketch.

In the example below, the temperature and humidity data from the DHT22 is served in a simple web page:

It is a modification of the IDE’s webserver example sketch that we used previously – with a few modifications. First, the webpage will automatically refresh every 30 seconds – this parameter is set in the line:

… and the custom HTML for our web page starts below the line:

You can then simply insert the required HTML inside client.print() functions to create the layout you need.

Finally – here’s an example screen shot of the example sketch at work:

arduino ethernet freetronics etherten dht22 humid cellular

You now have the framework to create your own web pages that can display various data processed with your Arduino.

Remote control your Arduino from afar

We have a separate tutorial on this topic, that uses the teleduino system.

Conclusion

So there you have it, another useful way to have your Arduino interact with the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. And if you enjoyed the tutorial, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

tronixstuff

Posted in arduino, DEV-09026, DEV-11230, DHT22, ethernet, internet, iot, shield, tronixstuff, tutorialComments (12)

Visualise microcontroller data with Megunolink Pro

Introduction

When the time comes to capture data from a microcontroller-based project, or control an embedded project via a PC – the thought of writing the appropriate PC software can give some people a headache. Or if you’re an Arduino or other development board user and are frustrated with the Serial Monitor box – where do you go? These problems and many more can be solved by using the Megunolink Pro software that’s the subject of this review.

From the Megunolink website,

MegunoLink Pro is a tool designed to aid embedded electronics designers. MegunoLink provides a set of tools to help visualize serial data, it is made up of a set of visualizers that each have a unique function and any number of them can be utilized at once. With these visualizers and our functional tabbed and docked interface you can create a full control center for your embedded project. Plot, log and monitor serial streams from both hardwired, bluetooth, and network based (UDP) devices.

The user interface allows for a completely customized layout with many different visualisers displaying information at once. Perfect for developing exciting new microcontroller based designs. Data streams go from hard to follow serial messages to easy to interpret tables and interactive plots. The interface panel allows you to set up custom GUI elements that let you take control of your device from the comfort of your PC screen.

Phil from Megunolink gives us a quick demonstration in the following video:

Installation

Getting Megunolink running takes around ten minutes. You’ll need a recent PC running Windows of some variety (XP/ 2003/Vista/Win7/8) and also .NET Framework v4.0. You can download a trial Pro version which operates for seven days – at which point you can use the “lite” version or purchase a Pro license. The Megunolink team have given our readers a discount on the personal version, use the coupon code “TROMLP” for 30% off.

Operation

Using Megunolink is quite simple, even though there’s a whole pile of functions. From the home page there’s a variety of documentation for all of the software features, so you can get started very quickly. You can simply capture all output from the serial line and have it saved to a text file (and with a time/date stamp, which removes the need for a RTC in the hardware) – something which seems quite simple but not done with the Arduino IDE:

rtccapture

Furthermore there is an “upload monitor” in Megunolink – which can automatically disconnect from the COM: port used by an Arduino when you need to upload a new sketch, then reconnect afterward. This saves a lot of to-and-fro between the two programs when adjusting code.

The key to analysing data from the microcontroller is to insert text notes in the serial output, which are then interpreted by Megunolink for display purposes. For example, if you have your MCU code send labels with the data, Megunolink can then sort these out into channels and graph the data, for example:

timeplot_screencapture

An example Arduino sketch is provided to demonstrate this, and it translates to other development platforms. Another great feature is the ability to create a graphical user interface for projects connected to the PCB. You design the GUI which can include buttons, sliders and numeric fields, for example:

controls

… and each of which send values of your choice to the device via USB. Then it’s a simple matter of coding your device to respond to the serial commands.

Real-time mapping

As mentioned in the video above, there’s also mapping support – your hardware sends GPS coordinates and they’re displayed in a real-time window:

mapping

Arduino programming

There’s also an interface to allow programming of an Arduino with .hex files via Megunolink. Currently it can work with the ATmega328, -2560, and with an external programmer -328P and -644 microcontrollers.

Conclusion

Once again Megunolink has proven to be a useful piece of software. It gives you a friendly and powerful connection to all the data from your microcontroller, and also a simple GUI for control via serial. So test it for yourself, it won’t cost you anything for the trial version. And if you like it – don’t forget about the tronixstuff.com discount on the personal version – use the coupon code “TROMLP” for 30% off. Finally, if you have any questions please contact Megunolink. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

[Note – Megunolink Pro software license was a promotional consideration]

 

Posted in arduino, data, data analysis, graphing, mapping, megunolink, review, software, software review, tronixstuffComments (2)

Improving Arduino to PC Interactions with MegunoLink

Introduction

Through a colleague I was introduced to a new piece of software for the Windows environment which comprises of useful tools that interact with an Arduino-style board (or other MCU with serial data). The software is called MegunoLink, from BlueLeafSoftware in New Zealand. Megunolink has many useful features, and we’ll run through them briefly in this article. They include:

  • Serial port monitoring – that doesn’t reset the MCU
  • The ability to capture serial port data to a text file
  • A tool to graph formatted data sent from the Arduino in real time
  • “George” the serial monkey! (see below)
  • Enable building Arduino projects using ATMEL AVRstudio
  • And Megunolink can also act as a graphical interface for AVRdude to upload compiled code to an Arduino

Installation was simple and straightforward. The installation is only ~1.5 megabytes and not taxing at all. We only have a Windows 7 64-bit machine, so haven’t tested this in emulation under MacOS or Linux. Before moving ahead, note that the software is free. However the developers do ask for a US$10 donation, and if you use the software more than once this is a very fair amount to pay for such a featured piece of software. Now for a look at each of the features.

Serial Data monitoring

As with the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE, you can monitor the data from the Arduino, and also send it back through the serial line. Just click the ‘Monitor’ tab and you’re set, for example:

However unlike the Arduino IDE, opening the monitor does not reset the Arduino. But if you do need to perform a reset, a button on the toolbar is provided as shown below:

Capturing Serial Data to a file

Very useful indeed, much quicker than dumping data to a microSD card and then bringing it back to the PC. Just click the ‘Log’ tab, specify a file location and name, then click ‘Enabled’, for example:

You can also append data to an existing text file. When creating the output format in your Arduino sketch, be mindful to have separators such as commas or colons – which make it much easier to delimit the data once imported into a spreadsheet or database application.

Plotting and Graphing Serial Data

Plotting data to a graph is very simple. You simply format the data you’d like to plot using Serial.write commands, and Megunolink takes care of the rest – just click the ‘Plotter’ tab and you’re off.  The data must be formatted as such:

Where ‘a’ is the name of the series. T tells MegunoLink to plot the actual real time, and b is the data as a number in string form. Here is a very simple example:

which resulted with:

Here is another example, it is the “SendSineCurve” sketch from the Arduino Graphing library:

You can always save the graph as an image in the usual formats as well as in .emf vector image file format.

“George” the Serial Monkey

This is a serial protocol simulator tool which is useful for testing the control of serial-based devices. You can setup George so that it listens for a particular pattern in the serial output from an Arduino – and then sends back a response of your choice to the Arduino. For example:

For a more detail explanation and detail tutorial on how to control George, see the MegunoLink website.

Arduino Development with AVR Studio 

Using MegunoLink you can develop Arduino projects with Atmel AVRStudio software. As some people find the Arduino IDE somewhat limiting, this option gives you access to the more programmer-friendly Atmel IDE, for example:

Although there is a small amount of tasks to make this possible, it is straightforward to do so, and an easy to follow tutorial has been provided at the MegunoLink website.

Upload compiled .HEX files to Arduino

For those using avrdude to upload compiled .hex files to an Ardiuno, you can also do this using the GUI MegunoLink interface. This is also used for uploading the compiled files generated in AVRStudio, for example:

As with all the other MegunoLink features – there is a relevant tutorial available on the website.

Conclusion

MegunoLink works well, is easy to use, and the price is right. It has to be the simplest tool available for plotting data from a microcontroller, or capturing it to a file without any extra hardware. So download it and give it a try, it won’t cost you anything and I’m sure you will find a use for it in the near future. And remember – if you’re using MegunoLink, please consider making a donation towards the development of further versions. Thanks to Freetronics for the use of their top-notch Arduino-compatible hardware.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, data analysis, megunolink, software review, tutorialComments (9)

Review: Agilent U1177A IR to Bluetooth Adaptor

In this review we examine the new Agilent U1177A infra-red to Bluetooth adaptor for the Agilent  U1272A DMM. You can also use the adaptor with the U1240-series DMMs with the optional adaptor. With some PC or Android device software you can monitor or log data from up to three DMMs. So let’s have a look and see what it’s all about.

Introduction

The adaptor arrives in a small box:

… with the following contents:

It was a relief to see the AAA cells included as we didn’t have any in stock. The yellow document is the China RoHS sheet, and the instructions are short but well detailed. The unit itself is quite small:

To fit the battery or reset the device, the front cover slides open revealing the innards to some degree:

and the rear:

The unit clips soundly to the rear of the DMM, however it does stick out quite a lot:

If you need to leave the meter unattended, you’ll need a level and vibration free surface, as the adaptor can be knocked out relatively easily from the top. The adaptor also blocks the hole at the back which some users may use with a hook or loop for positioning the DMM.

Software and Operation

You can use the U1177 with two platforms – Android and Windows, and we tested both. I’m sure if you have Mac Parallels, etc., that there may be some success there but I haven’t tested them. There are two applications available for Android devices – the mobile logger and mobile meter. You can download them both from the Google Play app – just search for ‘agilent‘, and the results should be

The third app is a game that is somewhat entertaining. We tried the applications on two Android devices – a HTC Velocity running Android 4.0.3 (which failed miserably, the software kept freezing) and a Motorola Xoom MZ601 with Android 3.2. I would say now that the software is marked “Beta” so caveat emptor. The data logging software worked on the Xoom but not the “Agilent Mobile Meter”. Moving forward, the logging software is quite good – you can display a graph, table or statistical value of the incoming data from up to three separate DMMs.

Below is a rough video of using the Xoom with data logging. We first make the Bluetooth connection, then measure resistance of a 1k ohm logarithmic pot, change the view to data table, then stop the logging and email the data. The app can email a .csv file which can be opened with any spreadsheet, etc. Using the app you can label each DMM feed to avoid confusion with the data files in the future.

Using the U1177A with a Windows 7 x64 machine was a lot more successful. You can download the Windows-based software from here (97 MB). After pairing the adaptor with the bluetooth connection software, the Agilent software loads but does not connect. You need to alter the data speed to 19200bps and select the COM port from the drop-down list in the “communication settings” on the left-hand side of the window, as shown below:

You can also use terminal software and AT commands to change the parameters of the U1177A, which is described in the user manual. Moving forward, once connected you can measure and log to your heart’s content. You can display a virtual meter:

8

Or choose a graphing display mode:

9

Note the short drop in value to zero as the graph increased on the far-right of the measurement in the image above. This occurs when the meter is changing range, just as the LCD will blink off then on due to the same phenomenon. Finally, you can also display the data as a table, for example:

10

Finally, you can export the data to a .csv file which can be opened with the usual spreadsheet or text editing software:

11

Using Windows OS Remote Multimeter Use Data Logging Other connection – hyperterminal etc. 

Conclusion

For data logging to a PC that is in Bluetooth range, the U1177A fits the bill. Although you can get a serial to IR cable (and early U1272A owners should have received one when the firmware update was released), the Bluetooth module will certainly be useful when moving around a worksite, or taking remote measurements from extreme temperature or NVH environments. The Android apps need to move out of beta stage – however due to the variety of devices and OS versions in the market this may be a long journey. However considering the price (~Au$52) it is inexpensive enough to keep around just-in-case.

Note – the U1177A was purchased by myself and reviewed without notice. Residing in Australia, ours was purchased from element14.com.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in agilent, android, bluetooth, multimeter, product review, review, test equipment, U1177A, U1272AComments (2)

Kit Review – Snootlab Mémoire SD card/RTC/prototyping shield

Hello Readers

In this article we will examine another product from a bundle sent for review by Snootlab, a Toulouse, France-based company that in their own words:

… designs and develops electronic products with an Open Hardware and Open Source approach. We are particularly specialized in the design of new shields for Arduino. The products we create are licensed under CC BY-SA v3.0 (as shown in documents associated with each of our creations). In accordance with the principles of the definition of Open Source Hardware (OSHW), we have signed it the 10th February 2011. We wish to contribute to the development of the ecosystem of “do it yourself” through original designs of products, uses and events.

Furthermore, all of their products are RoHS compliant and as part of the Open Hardware commitment, all the design files are available from the Snootlab website.

The subject of the review is the Snootlab Mémoire – an SD card data logging shield with on-board DS1307 real time clock [and matching backup battery] and prototyping area. It uses the standard SdFat library to write to normal SD memory cards formatted in FAT16 or FAT32. You can download the library from here. The real time clock IC is an easy to use I2C-interface model, and I have documented its use in great detail in this tutorial.

Once again, shield assembly is simple and quite straightforward. You can download an illustrated assembly guide from here, however it is in French. But everything you need to know is laid out on the PCB silk-screen, or the last page of the instructions. The it arrives in a reusable ESD bag:

… and all the required parts are included – including an IC socket and the RTC backup battery:

… the PCB is thick, with a very detailed silk-screen. Furthermore, it arrives with the SD card and 3.3V LDO (underneath) already pre-soldered – a nice touch:

The order of soldering the components is generally a subjective decision, and in this case I started with the resistors:

… and then worked my way out, but not fitting the battery nor IC until last. Intrestingly, the instructions require the crystal to be tacked down with some solder onto the PCB. Frankly I didn’t think it would withstand the temperature, however it did and all is well:

Which leaves us with a fully-assembled Mémoire shield ready for action:

Please note that a memory card is not included with the kit. If you are following along with your own Mémoire, the first thing to do after inserting the battery, IC and shield into your Arduino board and run some tests to ensure all is well. First thing is to test the DS1307 real-time clock IC. You can use the following sketch from chapter seven of my Arduino tutorial series:

If you are unsure about using I2C, please review my tutorial which can be found here. Don’t forget to update the time and date data in void setup(), and also comment out the setDateDS1307() function and upload the sketch a second time. The sketch output will be found on the serial monitor box – such as:

rtcdemooutput

Those of you familiar with the DS1307 RTC IC know that it can generate a nice 1 Hz pulse. To take advantage of this the SQW pin has an access hole on the PCB, beetween R10 and pin 8 of the IC:

For instruction on how to activate the SQW output, please visit the last section of this tutorial.

The next test is the SD card section of the shield. If you have not already done so, download and install the SdFat libary. Then, in the Arduino IDE, select File > Examples > SdFat > SdFatInfo. Insert the formatted (FAT16/32) SD card into the shield, upload the sketch, then open the serial monitor. You should be presented with something like this:

sdcardinfo

As you can see the sketch has returned various data about the SD card. Finally, let’s log some data. You can deconstruct the excellent example that comes with the SdFat library titled SdFatAnalogLogger (select File > Examples > SdFat > SdFatAnalogLogger). Using the functions:

you can “write” to the SD card in the same way as you would the serial output (that is, the serial monitor).

If you have reached this far without any errors – Congratulations! You’re ready to log. If not, remove the battery, SD card and IC from your shield (you used the IC socket, didn’t you?). Check the polarised components are in correctly, double-check your soldering and then reinsert the IC, shield and battery and try again. If that fails, support is available on the Snootlab website, and there is also a customer forum in French (use Google Translate). However as noted previously the team at Snootlab converse in excellent English and have been easy to contact via email if you have any questions. Stay tuned for the final Snootlab product review.

Snootlab products including the Snootlab Mémoire are available directly from their website. High-resolution images available on flickr.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow on twitterfacebook, or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the products reviewed in this article are promotional considerations made available by Snootlab]

Posted in arduino, ds1307, education, kit review, snootlabComments (0)

Tutorial: Arduino and the SPI bus part II

This is chapter thirty-six of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A seemingly endless series of articles on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here

[Updated 10/01/2013]

This is the second of several chapters in which we are investigating the SPI data bus, and how we can control devices using it with our Arduino systems. If you have not done so already, please read part one of the SPI articles. Again we will learn the necessary theory, and then apply it by controlling a variety of devices. As always things will be kept as simple as possible.

First on our list today is the use of multiple SPI devices on the single bus. We briefly touched on this in part one, by showing how multiple devices are wired, for example:

Notice how the slave devices share the clock, MOSI and MISO lines – however they both have their own chip select line back to the master device. At this point a limitation of the SPI bus becomes prevalent – for each slave device we need another digital pin to control chip select for that device. If you were looking to control many devices, it would be better to consider finding I2C solutions to the problem. To implement multiple devices is very easy. Consider the example 34.1 from part one – we controlled a digital rheostat. Now we will repeat the example, but instead control four instead of one. For reference, here is the pinout diagram:

Doing so may sound complex, but it is not. We connect the SCK, MOSI and  MISO pins together, then to Arduino pins D13, D11, D12 respectively. Each CS pin is wired to a separate Arduino digital pin. In our example rheostats 1 to 4 connect to D10 through to D7 respectively. To show the resistance is changing on each rheostat, there is an LED between pin 5 and GND and a 470 ohm resistor between 5V and pin 6. Next, here is the sketch:

Although the example sketch may be longer than necessary, it is quite simple. We have four SPI devices each controlling one LED, so to keep things easy to track we have defined led1~led4 to match the chip select digital out pins used for each SPI device. Then see the first four lines in void setup(); these pins are set to output in order to function as required. Next – this is very important – we set the pins’ state to HIGH. You must do this to every chip select line! Otherwise more than one CS pins may be initially low in some instances and cause the first data sent from MOSI to travel along to two or more SPI devices. With LEDs this may not be an issue, but for motor controllers … well it could be.

The other point of interest is the function

We pass the value for the SPI device we want to control, and the value to send to the device. The value for l is the chip select value for the SPI device to control, and ranges from 10~7 – or as defined earlier, led1~4. The rest of the sketch is involved in controlling the LED’s brightness by varying the resistance of the rheostats. Now to see example 36.1 in action via the following video clip:


(If you are wondering what I have done to the Freetronics board in that video, it was to add a DS1307 real-time clock IC in the prototyping section).

Next on the agenda is a digital-to-analogue converter, to be referred to using the acronym DAC. What is a DAC? In simple terms, it accepts a numerical value between zero and a maximum value (digital) and outputs a voltage between the range of zero and a maximum relative to the input value (analogue). One could consider this to be the opposite of the what we use the function analogRead(); for. For our example we will use a Microchip MCP4921 (data sheet.pdf):

(Please note that this is a beginners’ tutorial and is somewhat simplified). This DAC has a 12-bit resolution. This means that it can accept a decimal number between 0 and 4095 – in binary this is 0 to 1111 1111 1111 (see why it is called 12-bit) – and the outpout voltage is divided into 4096 steps. The output voltage for this particular DAC can fall between 0 and just under the supply voltage (5V). So for each increase of 1 in the decimal input value, the DAC will output around 1.221 millivolts.

It is also possible to reduce the size of the voltage output steps by using a lower reference voltage. Then the DAC will consider the reference voltage to be the maximum output with a value of 4095. So (for example) if the reference voltage was 2.5V, each increase of 1 in the decimal input value, the DAC will output around 0.6105 millivolts. The minimum reference voltage possible is 0.8V, which offers a step of 200 microvolts (uV).

The output of a DAC can be used for many things, such as a function generator or the playback of audio recorded in a digital form. For now we will examine how to use the hardware, and monitoring output on an oscilloscope. First we need the pinouts:

By now these sorts of diagrams shouldn’t present any problems. In this example, we keep pin 5 permanently set to GND; pin 6 is where you feed in the reference voltage – we will set this to +5V; AVss is GND; and Vouta is the output signal pin – where the magic comes from 🙂 The next thing to investigate is the MCP4921’s write command register:

Bits 0 to 11 are the 12 bits of the output value; bit 15 is an output selector (unused on the MPC4921); bit 14 controls the input buffer; bit 13 controls an inbuilt output amplifier; and bit 12 can shutdown the DAC. Unlike previous devices, the input data is spread across two bytes (or a word of data). Therefore a small amount of work needs to be done to format the data ready for the DAC. Let’s explain this through looking at the sketch for example 36.2 that follows. The purpose of the sketch is to go through all possible DAC values, from 0 to 4095, then back to 0 and so on.

First. note the variable outputvalue – it is a word, a 16-bit unsigned variable. This is perfect as we will be sending a word of data to the DAC. We put the increasing/decreasing value for a into outputValue. However as we can only send bytes of data at a time down the SPI bus, we will use the function highbyte() to separate the high side of the word (bits 15~8) into a byte variable called data.

We then use the bitwise AND and OR operators to set the parameter bits 15~12. Then this byte is sent to the SPI bus. Finally, the function lowbyte() is used to send the low side of the word (bits 7~0) into data and thence down the SPI bus as well.

Now for our demonstration sketch:

And a quick look at the DAC in action via an oscilloscope:

By now we have covered in detail how to send data to a device on the SPI bus. But how do we receive data from a device?

Doing so is quite simple, but some information is required about the particular device. For the rest of this chapter, we will use the Maxim DS3234 “extremely accurate” real-time clock. Please download the data sheet (.pdf) now, as it will be referred to many times.

The DS3234 is not available in through-hole packaging, so we will be using one that comes pre-soldered onto a very convenient breakout board:

It only takes a few moments to solder in some header pins for breadboard use. The battery type is CR1220 (12 x 2.0mm, 3V); if you don’t have a battery you will need to short out the battery holder with some wire otherwise the IC will not work. Readers have reported that the IC doesn’t keep time if the USB and external power are both applied to the Arduino at the same time.

A device will have one or more registers where information is read from and written to. Look at page twelve of the DS3234 data sheet, there are twenty-three registers, each containing eight bits (one byte) of data. Please take note that each register has a read and write address. An example – to retrieve the contents of the register at location 08h (alarm minutes) and place it into the byte data we need to do the following:

Don’t forget to take note of  the function SPI.setBitOrder(MSBFIRST); in your sketch, as this also determines the bit order of the data coming from the device. To write data to a specific address is also quite simple, for example:

Up to this point, we have not concerned ourselves with what is called the SPI data mode. The mode determines how the SPI device interprets the ‘pulses’ of data going in and out of the device. For a well-defined explanation, please read this article. With some devices (and in our forthcoming example) the data mode needs to be defined. So we use:

to set the data mode, within void(setup);. To determine a device’s data mode, as always – consult the data sheet. With our DS3234 example, the mode is mentioned on page 1 under Features List.

Finally, let’s delve a little deeper into SPI via the DS3234. The interesting people at Sparkfun have already written a good demonstration sketch for the DS3234, so let’s have a look at that and deconstruct it a little to see what is going on. You can download the sketch below from here, then change the file extension from .c to .pde.

Don’t let the use of custom functions and loops put you off, they are there to save time. Looking in the function SetTimeDate();, you can see that the data is written to the registers 80h through to 86h (skipping 83h – day of week) in the way as described earlier (set CS low, send out address to write to, send out data, set CS high). You will also notice some bitwise arithmetic going on as well. This is done to convert data between binary-coded decimal and decimal numbers.

Why? Go back to page twelve of the DS3234 data sheet and look at (e.g.) register 00h/80h – seconds. The bits 7~4 are used to represent the ‘tens’ column of the value, and bits 3~0 represent the ‘ones’ column of the value. So some bit shifting is necessary to isolate the digit for each column in order to convert the data to decimal. For other ways to convert between BCD and decimal, see the examples using the Maxim DS1307 in chapter seven.

Finally here is another example of reading the time data from the DS3234:

So there you have it – more about the world of the SPI bus and how to control the devices within.

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In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, BOB-10160, dac, DS3234, education, learning electronics, lesson, MCP4162, MCP4921, microcontrollers, SPI, tutorial, UncategorizedComments (14)

Tutorial: Video output from your Arduino

Create video output from your Arduino in chapter 35 of tutorials about the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

[Updated 10/01/2013]

In this chapter we will examine something different – the ability of our Arduino and compatible boards to create composite video output. In other words, displaying stuff from the Arduino on a TV. A lot of people were unaware of the ability to do this, however the process is very simple and not difficult to implement from a hardware perspective. Within this chapter we will learn to construct the minimum hardware required and demonstrate basic functions to get started.

To whet your appetite, here is a quick video demonstration of what is possible:

You can’t expect too much from a 16 MHz microcontroller without a video card… but the price is right, and with some imagination and the right functions you can do quite well. To make this happen we need to knock out some hardware of our own. Connection is very easy. First we need to locate three pins on our Arduino board. They will be used to output Sync, Video and also GND. For those with Arduino Uno/Freetronics Eleven etc Sync is digital 9, video is digital 7 and GND is … GND. If you have a Mega/Mega2560 Sync is digital 11 and video is A7. There is also the ability to generate audio with the methods in this article, and if you want to do this the Uno (etc.) pin is digital 11 or 10 on the Mega.

The monitor or television used needs to have a composite video-in socket (jack). For those with older televisions that have a VCR connected, you could use the video-in socket on the VCR. The schematic for video out is very simple, you only need two normal 0.25W resistors and a video lead:

If you’re not up for soldering into an RCA plug, a simple way is to chop up a standard video lead as such:

Then just wire the termination of the two resistors to the centre core (“pin”) and GND to the shield. For the purpose of this article I have made a quick TV-out shield that also includes a thumb joystick (as reviewed here).

A real triumph of engineering… however it solves the problem. The vertical trimmer is connected to A0;  the horizontal to A1; the button to digital 8 via a 10k0 pull-up resistor. Next, you will need to download and install the arduino-tvout library. It can be found here. We will use the TVoutBeta1.zip version.  Those of you who may have a nootropic design Hackvision – please note your library is different.

Now to see how to integrate TV-out into our sketch. We will run through the basic functions which integrated with your imagination should see some interesting results…  So let’s go!

For every project, place these two lines at the top of your sketch:

The first brings in the library, and the second line creates an instance of TV to use with the library functions. Next, we need to activate TVout and select the appropriate broadcast standard (PAL or NTSC). In void setup() use either

Now for the main functions. The first one of interest will be:

which … clears the screen. Or if you would like to fill the screen with white, use

Moving on – to write some text. First we need to select a font. There are three basic fonts to choose from:

  • font4x6 (each character being 4 pixels by 6 pixels, etc.)
  • font6x8
  • font8x8

Well there is four, but it wouldn’t display for me. Working on it! To choose a font use:

Then to write the text, choose the screen location with:

then display the text with:

You can also use TV.println(); to add a carriage return as expected. Display single characters with a position in the one function using:

So let’s have a look at the various fonts in action with the following sketch:

 

Now to move into the 1970s with some basic graphical functions. We have a screen resolution of 128 by 96 pixels to work with. When planning your display, you need to ensure that the sketch never attempts to display a pixel outside of the 128 x 96 screen area. Doing so generally causes the Arduino to reboot.

First let’s start with basic pixels. To draw a pixel, use:

where x and y are the coordinates of the pixel, and z is the colour (1 = white, 0 = black, 2 = inverse of current pixel’s colour). You want more than a pixel? How about a line:

Draws a line from x1, y1 to x2, y2 of colour colour. (1 = white, 0 = black, 2 = inverse of current pixel’s colour).

Rectangles? Easy:

Draws a rectangle with the top-left corner at x,y; width w, height h, colour and optional fill colour. Circles are just as simple:

Draws a circle with centre at x,y; radius r pixels, edge colour, optional fill colour.

Now to see these functions in action with the following sketch:

And for the video demonstration:

So there you have it, a start with Arduino and TV-out. Furthermore, a big thanks to http://code.google.com/u/mdmetzle/ for the arduino-tvout library.

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Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, COM-09032, education, lesson, tutorial, tv out, videoComments (42)

Tutorial: Arduino and the SPI bus

Learn how to use the SPI data bus with Arduino in chapter thirty-four of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A seemingly endless tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here

[Updated 10/01/2013]

This is the first of two chapters in which we are going to start investigating the SPI data bus, and how we can control devices using it with our Arduino systems. The SPI bus may seem to be a complex interface to master, however with some brief study of this explanation and practical examples you will soon become a bus master! To do this we will learn the necessary theory, and then apply it by controlling a variety of devices. In this tutorial things will be kept as simple as possible.

But first of all, what is it? And some theory…

SPI is an acronym for “Serial Peripheral Interface”. It is a synchronous serial data bus – data can travel in both directions at the same time, as opposed to (for example) the I2C bus that cannot do so. To allow synchronous data transmission, the SPI bus uses four wires. They are called:

  • MOSI – Master-out, Slave-in. This line carries data from our Arduino to the SPI-controlled device(s);
  • MISO – Master-in, Slave out. This line carries data from the SPI-controlled device(s) back to the Arduino;
  • SS – Slave-select. This line tells the device on the bus we wish to communicate with it. Each SPI device needs a unique SS line back to the Arduino;
  • SCK – Serial clock.

Within these tutorials we consider the Arduino board to be the master and the SPI devices to be slaves. On our Arduino Duemilanove/Uno and compatible boards the pins used are:

  • SS – digital 10. You can use other digital pins, but 10 is generally the default as it is next to the other SPI pins;
  • MOSI – digital 11;
  • MISO – digital 12;
  • SCK – digital 13;

Arduino Mega users – MISO is 50, MOSI is 51, SCK is 52 and SS is usually 53. If you are using an Arduino Leonardo, the SPI pins are on the ICSP header pins. See here for more information. You can control one or more devices with the SPI bus. For example, for one device the wiring would be:

Data travels back and forth along the MOSI and MISO lines between our Arduino and the SPI device. This can only happen when the SS line is set to LOW. In other words, to communicate with a particular SPI device on the bus, we set the SS line to that device to LOW, then communicate with it, then set the line back to HIGH. If we have two or more SPI devices on the bus, the wiring would resemble the following:


Notice how there are two SS lines – we need one for each SPI device on the bus. You can use any free digital output pin on your Arduino as an SS line. Just remember to have all SS lines high except for the line connected to the SPI device you wish to use at the time.

Data is sent to the SPI device in byte form. You should know by now that eight bits make one byte, therefore representing a binary number with a value of between zero and 255. When communicating with our SPI devices, we need to know which way the device deals with the data – MSB or LSB first. MSB (most significant bit) is the left-hand side of the binary number, and LSB (least significant bit) is the right-hand side of the number. That is:

Apart from sending numerical values along the SPI bus, binary numbers can also represent commands. You can represent eight on/off settings using one byte of data, so a device’s parameters can be set by sending a byte of data. These parameters will vary with each device and should be illustrated in the particular device’s data sheet. For example, a digital potentiometer IC with six pots:

sdata

This device requires two bytes of data. The ADDR byte tells the device which of six potentiometers to control (numbered 0 to 5), and the DATA byte is the value for the potentiometer (0~255). We can use integers to represent these two values. For example, to set potentiometer number two to 125, we would send 2 then 125 to the device.

How do we send data to SPI devices in our sketches?

First of all, we need to use the SPI library. It is included with the default Arduino IDE installation, so put the following at the start of your sketch:

Next, in void.setup() declare which pin(s) will be used for SS and set them as OUTPUT. For example,

where ss has previously been declared as an integer of value ten. Now, to activate the SPI bus:

and finally we need to tell the sketch which way to send data, MSB or LSB first by using

or

When it is time to send data down the SPI bus to our device, three things need to happen. First, set the digital pin with SS to low:

Then send the data in bytes, one byte at a time using:

Value can be an integer/byte between zero and 255. Finally, when finished sending data to your device, end the transmission by setting SS high:

Sending data is quite simple. Generally the most difficult part for people is interpreting the device data sheet to understand how commands and data need to be structured for transmission. But with some practice, these small hurdles can be overcome.

Now for some practical examples!

Time to get on the SPI bus and control some devices. By following the examples below, you should gain a practical understanding of how the SPI bus and devices can be used with our Arduino boards.

Example 34.1

Our first example will use a simple yet interesting part – a digital potentiometer (we also used one in the I2C tutorial). This time we have a Microchip MCP4162-series 10k rheostat:


Here is the data sheet.pdf for your perusal. To control it we need to send two bytes of data – the first byte is the control byte, and thankfully for this example it is always zero (as the address for the wiper value is 00h [see table 4-1 of the data sheet]).  The second byte is the the value to set the wiper, which controls the resistance. So to set the wiper we need to do three things in our sketch…

First, set the SS (slave select) line to low:

Then send the two byes of data:

Finally set the SS line back to high:

Easily done. Connection to our Arduino board is very simple – consider the MCP4162 pinout:

Vdd connects to 5V, Vss to GND, CS to digital 10, SCK to digital 13, SDI to digital 11 and SDO to digital 12. Now let’s run through the available values of the MCP4162 in the following sketch:

Now to see the results of the sketch. In the following video clip, a we run up through the resistance range and measure the rheostat value with a multimeter:

Before moving forward, if digital potentiometers are new for you, consider reading this short guide written by Microchip about the differences between mechanical and digital potentiometers.

Example 34.2

In this example, we will use the Analog Devices AD5204 four-channel digital potentiometer (data sheet.pdf). It contains four 10k ohm linear potentiometers, and each potentiometer is adjustable to one of 256 positions. The settings are volatile, which means they are not remembered when the power is turned off. Therefore when power is applied the potentiometers are all pre set to the middle of the scale. Our example is the SOIC-24 surface mount example, however it is also manufactured in DIP format as well.

 

To make life easier it can be soldered onto a SOIC breakout board which converts it to a through-hole package:

ad5204boardss

In this example, we will control the brightness of four LEDs. Wiring is very simple. Pinouts are in the data sheet.pdf.

ex34p2schematic

And the sketch:

The function allOff() and allOn() are used to set the potentiometers to minimum and maximum respectively. We use allOff() at the start of the sketch to turn the LEDs off. This is necessary as on power-up the wipers are generally set half-way. Furthermore we use them in the blinkAll() function to … blink the LEDs. The function setPot() accepts a wiper number (0~3) and value to set that wiper (0~255). Finally the function indFade() does a nice job of fading each LED on and off in order – causing an effect very similar to pulse-width modulation.

Finally, here it is in action:

Example 34.3

In this example, we will use use a four-digit, seven-segment LED display that has an SPI interface. Using such a display considerably reduces the amount of pins required on the micro controller and also negates the use of shift register ICs which helps reduce power consumption and component count. The front of our example:

7segfrss

and the rear:

7segrearss

Thankfully the pins are labelled quite clearly. Please note that the board does not include header pins – they were soldered in after receiving the board. Although this board is documented by Sparkfun there seems to be issues in the operation, so instead we will use a sketch designed by members of the Arduino forum. Not wanting to ignore this nice piece of hardware we will see how it works and use it with the new sketch from the forum.

Again, wiring is quite simple:

  • Board GND to Arduino GND
  • Board VCC to Arduino 5V
  • Board SCK to Arduino D12
  • Board SI to Arduino D11
  • Board CSN to Arduino D10

The sketch is easy to use, you need to replicate all the functions as well as the library calls and variable definitions. To display numbers (or the letters A~F) on the display, call the function

where a is the number to display, b is the base system used (2 for binary, 8 for octal, 10 for usual, and 16 for hexadecimal), and c is for padded zeros (0 =off, 1=on). If you look at the void loop() part of the example sketch, we use all four number systems in the demonstration. If your number is too large for the display, it will show OF for overflow. To control the decimal points, colon and the LED at the top-right the third digit, we can use the following:

After all that, here is the demonstration sketch for your perusal:

And a short video of the demonstration:

So there you have it – hopefully an easy to understand introduction to the world of the SPI bus and how to control the devices within. As always, now it is up to you and your imagination to find something to control or get up to other shenanigans. In the next SPI article we will look at reading and writing data via the SPI bus.

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In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS usng the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in AD5204, arduino, COM-09767, education, learning electronics, lesson, MCP4162, microcontrollers, SPI, tutorialComments (32)

Moving Forward with Arduino – Chapter 19 – GPS part II

Learn more about Arduino and GPS in chapter nineteen of a series originally titled “Getting Started with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Updated 24/01/2013

In this instalment we will continue to examine the use of our GPS system and Arduino through creating two more applications. Some of them may seem simple, but we will build on them later on to make more complex things. To review previous information, the first GPS instalment was chapter seventeen.

“Household official time”

At home we often have various discussions about what the actual time is. At first it sounds silly, but when you have clocks on the microwave, kitchen wall, a wristwatch, mobile phone, clock-radio, and so on – things can get a little out of hand. And my better half has all her clocks ten minutes fast. Insanity may prevail! So let’s make a nice big LED-display reference clock – something that wouldn’t look out of place in a radio or television studio:

Then when people start arguing over the time, you can point at your new clock and smile. From a hardware perspective, we will combine three or four things: our Arduino board, our GPS system, and the MAX7219 display driver. We will need the following items:

  • Arduino Uno or compatible board
  • the GPS shield bundle
  • Maxim MAX7219 display driver IC
  • two four-digit, seven-segment LED displays (common cathode). You could also rig up four separate digits with some patience;
  • one 1 kilo ohm resistor
  • one 10 kilo ohm resistor
  • one single pole, double-throw switch
  • a nice breadboard and some connecting wire
  • a separate 5V power supply – all those LED segments are thirsty, the completed clock uses under 350 milliamps with a brightness setting of 8:

exam19p1currss

Here is the schematic:

exam19p1schematicss

 

Although the sketch (download) may seem quite complex, it is just made up of things we have already examined in the past. The only unfamiliar part could be the MAX7219 display driver IC, which in itself is quite easy to use. There is a full part review and explanation here. It is most likely that everyone will have different LED display units, as the 4-digit modules can be hard to track for some people or too expensive –  so some more explanation is in order.

You will need common-cathode display modules. If you line the digits up from left to right, they will be numbered zero to nine with respect to the MAX7219 – so connect MAX7219 pin 2 to the cathode of your first display, and so on. With regards to the anodes (a~g and dp [decimal point]) – link each anode type together.

For example, if you have eight separate 7-segment display modules, connect each ‘a’ pin together, then to MAX pin 14. And so on. Here is the board layout – a real mess:

exam19p1boardss

And our action video:

An interesting twist you might find of interest is the function:

Which allows you to alter the brightness of the LED display(s). The range is 0 to 18 – in my examples it has been set to 8. You could then make your clock dim the display brightness between (for example) 11pm and 5am – so when you wake up in the middle of the night the display won’t act like a frickin’  laser-beam burning into your eyeballs. Furthermore, dropping the brightness reduces the power consumption.

gps_satellite_nasa_art-iif

 “You went… where?”

Now it is time for what most of you have been waiting for – making a GPS tracking device. Now before you get too excited, it would be proper to make sure you have the permission of someone before you track them. From a hardware perspective this example is a lot easier that you think – it is just the Arduino board, GPS shield and microSD shield. You will need to install TinyGPS library if not already installed.

Then, we will need the following items:

  • Arduino Uno or compatible board
  • the GPS shield bundle
  • microSD shield and a matching memory card up to 2GB in size
  • portable power, for example an alkaline 9V PP3 battery and adaptor cable

Download the Example 19.2 sketch from here.

Don’t forget to format the microSD card to FAT16 before use. Once power is applied, the system will take a position reading and write it to the microSD card every 30 seconds. You can alter this period by changing the value in the delay() function at the end of  void getgps(TinyGPS &gps). The text file is closed after every write, so you can just turn it off when finished then take the memory card to the computer to copy the data.

Although the hardware wasn’t that interesting to plug together, what can be done with it and the data it captures is quite fascinating. To generate some sample data, I have taken the hardware for a walk to the post office. We will now open the file produced by our hardware and examine it further. If you would like to follow along, you can download the file from here.

The file is a typical, comma-delimited text file. You can examine it further using common spreadsheet software such as LibreOffice Calc. For example, if you open the file of GPS data from here, you will be presented with the following window:

import

You can see that the data delimits quite easily. Just click “OK” and the file will be presented to you.

gpslogcsv

So as you can see, there is time, date (remember – GMT), latitude and longitude, my speed (with a couple of anomalies) and random sensor data results (see the sketch). We can have this data converted into a much more useful form by using the GPS Visualiser website. Save the data as a .csv file. Then visit http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/, and use the Get Started Now box in the middle of the web page. Select Google Maps as the output format, then upload the file. This will result in the following:

gpswalk

Just like normal Google Maps there are many display options you can choose from, and the GPS Visualiser web site has many tutorials about making the most of their service. If you look in detail you will see some “jittering” along parts of the track that are not representative of my movements (though I had just taken my morning coffee). This could be the result of the receiver module moving about in all three axes during my walk, one would imagine it would be a lot smoother inside a motor vehicle. So have fun with that.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, COM-09622, DEV-09802, GPS, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, RTL-10709, tronixstuff, tutorialComments (2)

Tutorial – Arduino and EM406A GPS

Learn how to use GPS and Arduino in chapter seventeen of a series originally titled “Getting Started with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here. If you have a MediaTek 3329 GPS module, please visit the separate tutorial.

Updated 14/01/2014

In this instalment we will introduce and examine the use of the Global Positioning System receivers with Arduino systems. What is the GPS? In very simple terms, a fleet of satellites orbit the earth, transmitting signals from space. Your GPS receiver uses signals from these satellites to triangulate position, altitude, compass headings, etc.; and also receives a time and date signal from these satellites. The most popular GPS belongs to the USA, and was originally for military use – however it is now available for users in the free world.

Interestingly, the US can switch off or reduce accuracy of their GPS in various regions if necessary, however many people tell me this is not an issue unless you’re in a combat zone against the US forces. For more information, have a look at Wikipedia or the USAF Space Command GPS Ops Centre site. As expected,  other countries have their own GPS as well – such as Russia, China, and the EU is working on one as well.

So – how can us mere mortals take advantage of a multi-billion dollar space navigation system just with our simple Arduino? Easy – with an inexpensive GPS receiver and shield. When searching for some hardware to use, I took the easy way out and ordered this retail GPS packwhich includes the required Arduino shield and header sockets, short connecting cable and an EM-406A 20-channel GPS receiver with in-built antenna:

packcontentsss

For reference now and in the future, here is the data book for the GPS receiver: EM-406 manual.pdf. All you will need is an Arduino Uno or 100% compatible board, and the usual odds and ends. When it comes time to solder up your shield, if possible try and sit it into another shield or board – this keeps the pins in line and saves a lot of trouble later on:

howtosolderss

And we’re done:

readyfor-workss

Please notice in the photo above the cable is a lot longer between the shield and the GPS receiver. This was an extra cable, which makes things a lot more convenient, and it never hurts to have a spare. Finally, on the shield please take note of the following  two switches – the shield/GPS power switch:

shieldonoffss

and the UART/DLINE switch:

uartdliness

For now, leave this set to UART while a sketch is running. When uploading a sketch to the board, this needs to be on DLINE. Always turn off your GPS shield board before changing  this switch to avoid damage.

Is anyone out there?

Now, let’s get some of that juicy GPS data from outer space. You will need:

Once you have your hardware assembled, upload the following sketch:

Now for desk jockeys such as myself, there is a catch – as a GPS receives signals from satellites the receiver will need to be in line of sight with the open sky. If you have your desk next to a window, or a portable computer you’re in luck.  Look at the LED on your GPS receiver – if it is blinking, it has a lock (this is what you want); on – it is searching for satellites; off – it is off (!). The first time you power up your receiver, it may take a  minute or so to lock onto the available satellites, this period of time is the cold start time.

This will be in ideal conditions – i.e. with a clear line of sight from the unit to the sky (clouds excepted!). Once this has been done, the next time you power it up, the searching time is reduced somewhat as our receiver stores some energy in a supercap (very high-value capacitor) to remember the satellite data, which it will use the next time to reduce the search time (as it already has a “fair idea” where the satellites are). Now open the serial monitor box, sit back and wait a moment or two, and you should be presented with something very similar to this:

example17p1data

What a mess. What on earth does all that mean? For one thing the hardware is working correctly. Excellent! Now how do we decode these space-signals… They are called NMEA codes. Let’s break down one and see what it means. For example, the line: $GPRMC,165307.000,A,2728.9620,S,15259.5159,E,0.20,48.84,140910,,*27 Each field represents:

  • $GPRMC tells us the following data is essential point-velocity-time data;
  • 165307.000 is the universal time constant (Greenwich Mean Time) – 16:53:07 (hours, minutes, seconds). So you now have a clock as well.
  • A is status – A for active and data is valid, V for void and data is not valid.
  • 2728.9620 is degrees latitude position data = 27 degrees, 28.962′
  • S for south (south is negative, north is positive)
  • 15259.5159 is degrees longitude position data = 152 degrees, 59.5159′
  • E for east (east is positive, west is negative)
  • 0.20 is my speed in knots over ground. This shows the inaccuracy  that can be caused by not having a clear view of the sky
  • 48.84 – course over ground (0 is north, 180 is south, 270 is west, 90 is east)
  • 140910 is the date – 14th September, 2010
  • the next is magnetic variation for which we don’t have a value
  • checksum number

Thankfully the data is separated by commas. This will be useful if you are logging the data to a text file using a microSD shield, you will then be able to use the data in a spreadsheet very easily. Later on we will work with data from other codes, but if you can’t wait, here is the NMEA Reference Manual that explains them all. In the meanwhile, how can we convert the location data (longitude and latitude) received into a position on a map?

  • Visit this website
  • In the box that says “paste your data here”, enter (for example, using my data above)

For example:

visualiser

Then click “Draw the Map”, and you will be presented with a Google map in a new window that you can zoom around in, change views and so on. Interestingly enough the coordinates returned in the test above were accurate down to around three meters. Later on that website will be of great use, as you can import text files of coordinates, and it will plot them out for you. If you use this mapping site a lot, please consider making a donation to help them out. Now as always, there is an easier way. The purpose of the previous demonstrations were to see the raw data that comes from a receiver, and understand how to work with it.

gps_satellite_nasa_art-iif

Moving on… now we can receive GPS signals – and in the past we have used LCD modules – so we can make our own variations of portable (!) GPS modules and other devices. At this point you will need to install another Arduino library – TinyGPSSo download and install that before moving forward.

“My First GPS”

Using various pieces of hardware from the past, we will build a simple, portable unit to display our data.

You will need:

  • Arduino Uno or compatible board
  • a suitable GPS setup – for example the GPS shield bundle
  • An LCD with HD44780 interface that has the ability to connect to your Arduino system. The size is up to you, we’re using a 20 x 4 character unit. If you have dropped in or are a bit rusty on LCDs, please read chapter twenty-four;
  • An external power supply for your setup (if you want to walk up and down the street at midnight like I did) – for example, a 9V battery snap soldered to a DC plug is a quick and dirty solution!

Luckily I have made an LCD shield in the past which works nicely, and doesn’t use digital pins D0 and D1 – these are used by the GPS shield to get the data back to the Arduino. Therefore the whole lot just plugged in together as shields do. Here is the sketch for your consideration:

Before uploading the sketch, turn off the GPS shield, set the DLINE/UART switch on the GPS shield to DLINE, upload the sketch, then set it back again, then back on with the GPS shield. So here it is all thrown together in my lunch box:

exam17p2boxss

And a close-up view of the LCD. There was not room for the course data, but you can modify the sketch accordingly. The data will be a little off due to the photo being taken indoors:

exam17p2lcdss

Now for some outdoor fun. In the video clip below, we take a ride on the bus and see our GPS in action. I had to take an old bus that wasn’t full of security cameras, so the ride is bumpy:

sl250ss

As we have a lot of electronics in this setup, it would be interesting to know the current draw – to help plan for an appropriate power supply. The trusty meter gives us:

exam17p2currentss

Wow – a maximum of 122 milliamps even with that LCD backlight blazing away. So when we make some GPS logging devices without such a monstrous LCD, we should be able to get the current draw down a lot more. The purpose of this example was to show how you can manipulate the data from the GPS receiver.

“Household official time”

At home we often have various discussions about what the actual time is. At first it sounds silly, but when you have clocks on the microwave, kitchen wall, a wristwatch, mobile phone, clock-radio, and so on – things can get a little out of hand. And my better half has all her clocks ten minutes fast. Insanity may prevail! So let’s make a nice big LED-display reference clock – something that wouldn’t look out of place in a radio or television studio:

Then when people start arguing over the time, you can point at your new clock and smile. From a hardware perspective, we will combine three or four things: our Arduino board, our GPS system, and the MAX7219 display driver. We will need the following items:

  • Arduino Uno or compatible board
  • the GPS shield bundle
  • Maxim MAX7219 display driver IC
  • two four-digit, seven-segment LED displays (common cathode). You could also rig up four separate digits with some patience;
  • one 1 kilo ohm resistor
  • one 10 kilo ohm resistor
  • one single pole, double-throw switch
  • a nice breadboard and some connecting wire
  • a separate 5V power supply – all those LED segments are thirsty, the completed clock uses under 350 milliamps with a brightness setting of 8:

 

Here is the schematic:

And the sketch:

Although the sketch may seem quite complex, it is just made up of things we have already examined in the past. The only unfamiliar part could be the MAX7219 display driver IC, which in itself is quite easy to use. There is a full part review and explanation here. It is most likely that everyone will have different LED display units, as the 4-digit modules can be hard to track for some people or too expensive –  so some more explanation is in order.

You will need common-cathode display modules. If you line the digits up from left to right, they will be numbered zero to nine with respect to the MAX7219 – so connect MAX7219 pin 2 to the cathode of your first display, and so on. With regards to the anodes (a~g and dp [decimal point]) – link each anode type together.

For example, if you have eight separate 7-segment display modules, connect each ‘a’ pin together, then to MAX pin 14. And so on. Here is the board layout – a real mess:

And our action video:

An interesting twist you might find of interest is the function:


Which allows you to alter the brightness of the LED display(s). The range is 0 to 18 – in my examples it has been set to 8. You could then make your clock dim the display brightness between (for example) 11pm and 5am – so when you wake up in the middle of the night the display won’t act like a frickin’  laser-beam burning into your eyeballs. Furthermore, dropping the brightness reduces the power consumption.

”You went… where?”

Now it is time for what most of you have been waiting for – making a GPS tracking device. Now before you get too excited, it would be proper to make sure you have the permission of someone before you track them. From a hardware perspective this example is a lot easier that you think – it is just the Arduino board, GPS shield and microSD shield. You will need to install TinyGPS library if not already installed.

Then, we will need the following items:

  • Arduino Uno or compatible board
  • the GPS shield bundle
  • microSD shield and a matching memory card up to 2GB in size
  • portable power, for example an alkaline 9V PP3 battery and adaptor cable

And here is the sketch:

Don’t forget to format the microSD card to FAT16 before use. Once power is applied, the system will take a position reading and write it to the microSD card every 30 seconds. You can alter this period by changing the value in the delay() function at the end of  void getgps(TinyGPS &gps). The text file is closed after every write, so you can just turn it off when finished then take the memory card to the computer to copy the data.

Although the hardware wasn’t that interesting to plug together, what can be done with it and the data it captures is quite fascinating. To generate some sample data, I have taken the hardware for a walk to the post office. We will now open the file produced by our hardware and examine it further. If you would like to follow along, you can download the file from here.

The file is a typical, comma-delimited text file. You can examine it further using common spreadsheet software such as LibreOffice Calc. For example, if you open the file of GPS data from here, you will be presented with the following window:

You can see that the data delimits quite easily. Just click “OK” and the file will be presented to you.

So as you can see, there is time, date (remember – GMT), latitude and longitude, my speed (with a couple of anomalies) and random sensor data results (see the sketch). We can have this data converted into a much more useful form by using the GPS Visualiser website. Save the data as a .csv file. Then visit http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/, and use the Get Started Now box in the middle of the web page. SelectGoogle Maps as the output format, then upload the file. This will result in the following:

Just like normal Google Maps there are many display options you can choose from, and the GPS Visualiser web site has many tutorials about making the most of their service. If you look in detail you will see some “jittering” along parts of the track that are not representative of my movements (though I had just taken my morning coffee). This could be the result of the receiver module moving about in all three axes during my walk, one would imagine it would be a lot smoother inside a motor vehicle. So have fun with that.

LEDborder

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, beginnner, education, GPS, GPS-09123, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, RTL-10709, tutorialComments (13)


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