Tag Archive | "ez"

Review – Schmartboard SMT Boards

In this article we review a couple of SMT prototyping boards from Schmartboard.

Introduction

Sooner or later you’ll need to use a surface-mount technology component. Just like taxes and myki* not working, it’s inevitable. When the time comes you usually have a few options – make your own PCB, then bake it in an oven or skillet pan; get the part on a demo board from the manufacturer (expensive); try and hand-solder it yourself using dead-bug wiring or try to mash it into a piece of strip board; or find someone else to do it. Thanks to the people at Schmartboard you now have another option which might cost a few dollars more but guarantees a result. Although they have boards for almost everything imaginable, we’ll look at two of them – one for QFP packages and their Arduino shield that has SOIC and SOP23-6 areas.

boards

QFP 32-80 pin board

In our first example we’ll see how easy it is to prototype with QFP package ICs. An example of this is the Atmel ATmega328 microcontroller found on various Arduino-compatible products, for example:

atmega

Although our example has 32 pins, the board can handle up to 80-pin devices. You simply place the IC on the Schmartboard, which holds the IC in nicely due to the grooved tracks for the pins:

atmegabefore

The tracks are what makes the Schmartboard EZ series so great – they help hold the part in, and contain the required amount of solder. I believe this design is unique to Schmartboard and when you look in their catalogue, select the “EZ” series for this technology. Moving forward, you just need some water-soluble flux:

fluxpen

then tack down the part, apply flux to the side you’re going to solder – then slowly push the tip of your soldering iron (set to around 750 degrees F) down the groove to the pin. For example:

Then repeat for the three other sides. That’s it. If your part has an exposed pad on the bottom, there’s a hole in the centre of the Schmartboad that you can solder into as well:

qfpheat

After soldering I really couldn’t believe it worked, so probed out the pins to the breakout pads on the Schmartboard to test for shorts or breaks – however it tested perfectly. The only caveat is that your soldering iron tip needs to be the same or smaller pitch than the the part you’re using, otherwise you could cause a solder bridge. And use flux!  You need the flux. After soldering you can easily connect the board to the rest of your project or build around it.

Schmartboard Arduino shield

There’s also a range of Arduino shields with various SMT breakout areas, and we have the version with 1.27mm pitch SOIC and a SOT23-6 footprint. SOIC? For example:

soicic

This is the AD5204 four-channel digital potentiometer we used in the SPI tutorial. It sits nicely in the shield and can be easily soldered onto the board. Don’t forget the flux! Although the SMT areas have the EZ-technology, I still added a little solder of my own – with satisfactory results:

The SOT23-6 also fits well, with plenty of space for soldering it in. SOT23? Example – the ADS1110 16-bit ADC which will be the subject of a future tutorial:

ads1110

Working with these tiny components is also feasible but requires a finer iron tip and a steady hand.

sot236

Once the SMT component(s) have been fitted, you can easily trace out the matching through-hole pads for further connections. The shield matches the Arduino R3 standards and includes stacking header sockets, two LEDs for general use, space and parts for an RC reset circuit, and pads to add pull-up resistors for the I2C bus:

otherparts

Finally there’s also three 0805-sized parts and footprints for some practice or use. It’s a very well though-out shield and should prove useful. You can also order a bare PCB if you already have stacking headers to save money.

Conclusion

If you’re in a hurry to prototype with SMT parts, instead of mucking about – get a Schmartboard. They’re easy to use and work well.  Full-sized images available on flickr.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The boards used in this article were a promotional consideration supplied by Schmartboard.

*myki

Posted in arduino, product review, review, safety, schmartboard, SMD, SMT, soic, soldering, sot-23, tqfp, tronixstuff, tutorialComments (2)

Kit review – nootropics design EZ-Expander Shield

Hello readers

Today we are going introduce an inexpensive yet useful kit for Arduino people out there – the nootropic design EZ-Expander shield. As the name would suggest, this is an Arduino shield kit that you can easily construct yourself. The purpose of the shield is to give you an extra 16 digital outputs using only three existing digital pins. This is done by using two 74HC595 shift registers – whose latch, clock and data lines are running off digital pins 8, 12 and 13 respectively. For more information about the 74HC595 and Arduino, read my tutorial here, or perhaps download the data sheet.

Before moving forward I would like to note that the kit hardware is licensed under Creative Commons by-sa v3.0, and the design files are available on the nootropic design website; the software (Arduino library) is licensed under the CC-GNU LGPL. Nice one.

However, there is a library written instead to make using the new outputs easier. More on that later… now let’s build it and see how the EZ-Expander performs. Packaing is simple and effective, like most good kits these days – less is more:

packagingss

Everything you need and nothing you do not. The design and assembly instructions can be found by visiting the URL as noted on the label. The parts are simple and of good quality:

partsss4

The PCB is great, a nice colour, solder-masked and silk-screened very well. And IC sockets – excellent. There has been some discussion lately on whether or not kit producers should include IC sockets, I for one appreciate it. However, what I did not appreciate was having to chop up the long header socket to make a six- and eight-pin socket, as such:

cuttingss

Why the producers did not include real 6 and 8 pin sockets is beyond me. I’m not a fan of chopping things up, but my opinion is subjective. However there are a few extra pin-widths for a margin of error, so life goes on. The instructions on the nootropic design website were well illustrated, however the design is that simple you can determine it from the PCB. First, in with the capacitors for power smoothing:

capsss

Then solder in those lovely IC sockets and the header sockets:

socketsinss

Then time for the shield pins themselves. As usual, the easiest way is to insert the pins into another socket, then drop the new shield on top and solder away:

liningupss

Finally, insert the shift registers, and you’re done:

finishedss6

The shield is designed to still allow access to the digital pins zero to seven, and the analogue pins. Here is a top-down view of the shield in use:

topdownfinishedss

From a software perspective, download the library from here and install it into your arduino-00xx\libraries folder. Then it is simple to make use of the new outputs (20 to 35) on the shield, just include the library in your sketch as such:

then create an EZexpander object:

with which you can control the outputs with. For example,

sets the new output pin number 20 high. You can also buffer the pin mode requests, and send the lot out at once. For example, if you wanted pins 21, 22 and 23 to be HIGH at once, you would execute the following:

What happened is that you set the pin status up in advance, then sent all the commands out at once using the expander.doShiftOut(); function. The maximum amount of current you can source from each new output according to the designers is theoretically six milliamps, which is odd as the 74HC595 data sheet claims that 25 milliamps is possible. In the following demonstration I sourced 10 milliamps per LED, and everything was fine. Here is the sketch for your reference:

And the demonstration in action:

Overall, this is an inexpensive and simple way to gain more outputs on an Arduino Duemilanove/Uno or 100% compatible board. Also good for those who are looking for a kit for basic soldering practice that has a real use afterwards. High resolution images are available on flickr.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts. Or join our Google Group.

Posted in arduino, kit review, notropicsComments (4)


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