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Review: Gravitech 7-Segment Arduino Shield

Hello Readers

In this article we examine the “7-Segment Arduino Shield” received for review from the team at Gravitech in the United States. This is an Arduino Uno/Duemilanove-type compatible shield that contains four very useful items:

  • Four 7-segment LED numerical displays – driven by the NXP SAA1064 LED display driver IC;
  • A large 10mm RGB LED;
  • A Microchip 24LC128 EEPROM, and
  • A TI TMP75 digital temperature sensor.
Apart from the LED all the other components are controlled via the I2C bus. So as well as being generally useful for experimenting, monitoring temperature and so on, this is an ideal board for Arduino and I2C bus practice. (If you have not done so already, consider reading our I2C tutorial, part one and two). Let’s look at the hardware, then move on to using the features.
As with other Gravitech products, the shield arrives in a reusable static shielding bag:
and here we have it:
The IC at the top-left of the shield is the TMP75 temperature sensor, bottom-left is the 24LC128 EEPROM, and the whopper below the first two digits is the NXP SAA1064. The shield layout is very neat and clean, and the white finish is a pleasant change compared to the usual black or green Arduino shields out there. The PWR LED is a blue colour. The only issues I found were that you cannot use this with a Mega due to the location of the I2C pins, and the component leads were not trimmed at the factory, which caused an issue when the shield was inserted into an Ethernet shield. This is easily solved by clipping the leads yourself:
Here is the shield in operation using the supplied demonstration sketch. The temperature is displayed in Celsius, with the LED changing colour depending on the temperature:

That is all very good, but how do we use the features of the board? Let’s look at each of the aforementioned features individually. First of all, the numeric display. The four seven-segment LED displays are controlled by the NXP SAA1064 LED display driver (data sheet (.pdf)). I have written a separate tutorial on how to use this IC, and it is completely compatible with this shield. So visit the tutorial here and put the numbers to work! Please note the I2C bus address for the SAA1064  is 0x38.

Next we have the RGB LED. Red, green and blue are connected to digital pins 3, 5 and 6 respectively. These are also pulse-width modulation pins, so you can have altering the brightness. Here is a simple demonstration sketch:

And for the curious, here it is in action:

Next, the Microchip 24LC128 EEPROM. It has 128kbit storage space, which translates to 16 kilobytes. The I2C bus address is 0x50. Once again there is a complete explanation of how to use this sort of EEPROM in another tutorial – check it out. But for quick reference the following demonstration sketch writes the numbers 0~255 to memory locations 0~255:

Although there is 16 kilobytes of memory the sketch only writes and reads to the first 255 locations. Each location can store a byte of value between zero and 255. Here is a screen shot of the serial monitor results (click to enlarge):

And now time to work with the Texas Instruments TMP75 temperature sensor (data sheet.pdf). It has a reasonable operating temperature range of between -40 and 125 degrees Celsius – however this would exceed the range in which your Arduino is capable of working, so no leaving the shield on the car dashboard during a hot summer’s day. The I2C bus address for the TMP75 is 0x49. We will deconstruct the Gravitech demonstration sketch to explain how the temperature works.

The TMP75 needs to be initialised before measurement can take place, by sending the following data:

The temperature data is received in two bytes of data, as it spans 12 bits. Thankfully the demonstration sketch has done the work for us. Have a look at the Cal_temp() function, which converts the two raw bytes of data from the TMP75. There is some bitwise arithmetic in there, however if you are not keen on going down to that level, it is easy enough to cut and paste the temperature and numeric display functions.  Here is a quick video of the demonstration sketch in action:

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So there you have it – another useful and educational shield for use with your Arduino. If you have any questions or enquiries please direct them to Gravitech via their contact page. Gravitech products including the 7-segment shield are available directly from their website or these distributors.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow on twitterfacebook, or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the shield reviewed in this article was a  promotional consideration made available by Gravitech]

High resolution photos are available on flickr.

Posted in 24LC128, arduino, gravitech, I2C, LED, microcontrollers, product review, review, SAA1064, TMP75, tutorialComments (0)

Tutorial: Gravitech Arduino Nano MP3 Player

Hello readers

[Update: 21/05/2013. Tutorial now out of date, and I don’t have a Nano to test it with the new code. Try this instead. If you have hardware questions or enquiries relating to the Arduino Nano or MP3 board, please direct them to Gravitech via their contact page.

Posted in arduino, gravitech, learning electronics, lesson, microcontrollers, mp3, tutorial

July 2011 Competition Results

Competition over.

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July 2011 Competition

Competition over!

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Review: The Gravitech Arduino Nano family

Hello Readers

In this article we will examine a variety of products received for review from Gravitech in the United States – the company that designed and build the Arduino Nano. We have a Nano and some very interesting additional modules to have a look at.

So let’s start out review with the Arduino Nano. What is a Nano? A very, very small version of our Arduino Duemilanove boards. It contains the same microcontroller (ATmega328) but in SMD form; has all the I/O pins (plus two extra analogue inputs); and still has a USB interface via the FT232 chip. But more on that later. Nanos arrive in reusable ESD packaging which is useful for storage when not in use:

Patriotic Americans should note that the Nano line is made in the USA. Furthermore, here is a video clip of Nanos being made:

For those who were unsure about the size of the Nano, consider the following images:

You can easily see all the pin labels and compare them to your Duemilanove or Uno board. There is also a tiny reset button, the usual LEDs, and the in circuit software programmer pins. So you don’t miss out on anything by going to a Nano. When you flip the board over, the rest of the circuitry is revealed, including the FTDI USB>serial converter IC:

Those of you familiar with Arduino systems should immediately recognise the benefit of the Nano – especially for short-run prototype production. The reduction in size really is quite large. In the following image, I have traced the outline of an Arduino Uno and placed the Nano inside for comparison:

So tiny… the board measures 43.1mm (1.7″) by 17.8mm (0.7″). The pins on this example were pre-soldered – and are spaced at standard 2.54mm (0.1″) intervals – perfect for breadboarding or designing into your own PCB –  however you can purchase a Nano without the pins to suit your own mounting purposes. The Nano meets all the specifications of the standard Arduino Duemilanove-style boards, except naturally the physical dimensions.

Power can be supplied to the Nano via the USB cable; feeding 5V directly into the 5V pin, or 7~12 (20 max, not recommended) into the Vin pin. You can only draw 3.3V at up to 50 mA when the Nano is running on USB power, as the 3.3V is sourced from the FTDI USB>serial IC. And the digital I/O pins still allow a current draw up to 40 mA each. From a software perspective you will not have any problems, as the Nano falls under the same board classification as the (for example) Arduino Duemilanove:

Therefore one could take advantage of all the Arduino fun and games – except for the full-size shields. But as you will read soon, Gravitech have got us covered on that front. If the Arduino system is new to you, why not consider following my series of tutorials? They can be found here. In the meanwhile, to put the size into perspective – here is a short video of a Nano blinking some LEDs!

Now back to business. As the Nano does not use standard Arduino shields, the team at Gravitech have got us covered with a range of equivalent shields to enable all sorts of activities. The first of this is their Ethernet and microSD card add-on module:

and the underside:

Again this is designed for breadboarding, or you could most likely remove the pins if necessary. The microSD socket is connected as expected via the SPI bus, and is fully compatible with the default Arduino SD library. As shown in the following image the Nano can slot directly into the ethernet add-in module:

The Ethernet board requires an external power supply, from 7 to 12 volts DC. The controller chip is the usual Wiznet 5100 model, and therefore the Ethernet board is fully compatible with the default Ethernet Arduino library. We tested it with the example web server sketch provided with the Arduino IDE and it all just worked.

The next add-on module to examine is the 2MOTOR board:

… and the bottom:

Using this module allows control of two DC motors with up to two amps of current each via pulse-width modulation. Furthermore, there is a current feedback circuit for each motor so you measure the motor load and adjust power output – interesting. So a motorised device could sense when it was working too hard and ease back a little (like me on a Saturday). All this is made possible by the use of the common L298 dual full-bridge motor driver IC. This is quite a common motor driver IC and is easy to implement in your sketches. The use of this module and the Nano will help reduce the size of any robotics or motorised project. Stay tuned for use of this board in future articles.

Next in this veritable cornucopia of  add-on modules is the USBHOST board:

turning it over …

Using the Maxim MAX3421E host controller IC you can interface with all sorts of devices via USB, as well as work with the new Android ADK. The module will require an external power supply of between 7 and 12 volts DC, with enough current to deal with the board, a Nano and the USB device under control – one amp should be more than sufficient. I will be honest and note that USB and Arduino is completely new to me, however it is somewhat fascinating and I intend to write more about using this module in the near future. In the meanwhile, many examples can be found here.

For a change of scene there is also a group of Xbee wireless communication modules, starting with the Xbee add-on module:

The Xbee itself is not included, only shown for a size comparison. Turning the module over:

It is nice to see a clearly-labelled silk screen on the PCB. If you are unfamiliar with using the Xbee wireless modules for data communication, you may find my introductory tutorial of interest. Furthermore, all of the Gravitech Nano modules are fully software compatible with my tutorial examples, so getting started will be a breeze. Naturally Gravitech also produce an Xbee USB interface board, to enable PC communication over your wireless modules:

Again, note that the Xbee itself is not included, however they can be supplied by Gravitech. Turning the board over reveals another highly-detailed silk screen:

All of the Gravitech Xbee modules support both series 1.0 and 2.5 Xbees, in both standard and professional variants. The USB module also supports the X-CTU configuration software from Digi.

Finally – leaving possibly the most interesting part until last, we have the MP3 Player add-on board:

and on the B-side:

The MP3 board is designed around the VS1053B MP3 decoder IC. It can also decode Ogg Vorbis, AAC, WMA and MID files. There is a 3.5mm stereo output socket to connect headphones and so on. As expected, the microSD card runs from the SPI pins, however SS is pin 4. Although it may be tempting to use this to make a home-brew MP3 player, other uses could include: recorded voice messages for PA systems such as fire alarm notices, adding sound effects to various projects or amusement machines, or whatever else you can come up with.

Update – We have examined the MP3 board in more detail with a beginner’s tutorial.

The Arduino Nano and related boards really are tiny, fully compatible with their larger brethren, and will prove very useful. Although this article was an introductory review, stay tuned for further projects and articles that will make use of the Nano and other boards. If you have any questions or enquiries please direct them to Gravitech via their contact page. Gravitech products including the Arduino Nano family are available directly from their website or these distributors.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow on twitterfacebook, or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the products reviewed in this article are promotional considerations made available by Gravitech]

High resolution photos are available on flickr.

Otherwise, have fun, be good to each other – and make something! 

Posted in arduino, ethernet, gravitech, microcontrollers, mp3, nano, part review, xbeeComments (0)


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