Tag Archive | "internet"

Online data analysis with Arduino and plotly

Introduction

It’s 2014 and the Internet-of-Things is flying along at a rapid rate with all sorts of services and devices that share data and allow control via the Internet. In the spirit of this we look a new service called plotly.

This is a “collaborative data analysis and graphing tool” which allows you to upload your own data to be analysed in many ways, and then graph the results using all sorts of plot types.

With plotly you can run your own mathematical functions over your data, run intense statistical analysis and use or edit one of the many APIs (PythonMATLABRJuliaRESTArduino, or Perl) to increase the level of customisation. Plotly works in conjunction with Google Drive to store your data, however this can be exported and imported without any issues. Futhermore plotly works best in Google Chrome.

For our review we’ll look at using plotly to quickly display and analyse data received from an Internet-connected Arduino – our EtherTen, or you can use almost any Arduino and Ethernet shield. The system isn’t completely documented however by revieiwng our example sketch and some experimenting with the interface plotly is very much usable, even in its current beta format.

Getting started with plotly

You will need to setup a plotly account, and this is simply accomplished from their main site. Some of you may be wondering what plotly costs – at the time of writing plotly is free for unlimited public use (that is – anyone can see your data with the right URL), but requires a subscription for extended private use. You can find the costs at the plans page.

Once you have a plotly account, visit your plotly home page, whose URL is https://plot.ly/~yourusername/# – then click “edit profile”. Another window will appear which amongst other things contains your plotly API key – make a note of this as you will need it and your username for the Arduino sketch.

Next, you’ll need some Arduino or compatible hardware to capture the data to log and analyse. An Arduino with an Ethernet or WiFi connection, and appropriate sensors for your application. We have our EtherTen that takes readings from a temperature/humidity sensor and a light level sensor:

Freetronics EtherTen Arduino Plotly

Now you need a new Arduino library, which is available from the plotly API page. Lots of APIs there… Anyhow, click “Arduino” and you will arrive at the github page. Download the entire .zip file, and extract the plotly_ethernet folder into Arduino libraries folder which in most installations can be found at ..\Arduino-1.0.x\libraries. 

plotly arduino library folder

Finally we’ll use a demonstration sketch provided by plotly and modify this to our needs, which can be downloaded from github. We’ll go through this sketch and show you what to update – so have a quick look and then at out example sketch at the end of this section.

First, insert any code required to get data from your sensors and store the data in a variable – do this so the values can be used in void loop. Next, update the MAC address and the IP address of your Ethernet-enabled Arduino with the following lines:

and change the MAC and IP if necessary. If Arduino and Ethernet is new to you, check out the tutorial. Now look for the following two lines and enter your plotly username and API key:

Next – it’s a good idea to set your time zone, so the time in plots makes sense. Add the following two lines in void setup():

You can find a list of time zones available for use with plotly here. Now you need to determine how many traces and points to use. A trace is one source of data, for example temperature. For now you will have one point, so set these parameters using the following lines:

For example, we will plot temperature, humidity and light level – so this requires three traces. The next step is to set the filename for the plot, using the following line:

This will be sent to plotly and your data will be saved under that name. At the point in your sketch where you want to send some data back to plotly, use:

… then the following for each trace:

where data is the variable to send back to plotly. We use millis() as our example is logging data against time.

To put all that together, consider our example sketch with the hardware mentioned earlier:

After wiring up the hardware and uploading the sketch, the data will be sent until the power is removed from the Arduino.

Monitoring sensor data

Now that your hardware is sending the data off to plotly, you can check it out in real time. Log into plotly and visit the data home page – https://plot.ly/plot – for example:

plotly home data page

Your data file will be listed – so just click on the file name to be presented with a very basic graph. Over time you will see it develop as the data is received, however you may want to alter the display, headings, labels and so on. Generally you can click on trace labels, titles and so on to change them, the interface is pretty intuitive after a few moments. A quick screencast of this is shown in this video.

To view and analyse the raw data – and create all sorts of custom plots, graphs and other analysis – click the “view data in grid” icon which is the second from the left along the bar:

view data grid button

At which point your data will be displayed in a new tab:

plotly arduino data grid

From this point you can experiment to your heart’s content – just don’t forget to save your work. In a short amount of time your data can be presented visually and analysed with ease:

plotly arduino data graph

Conclusion

Although plotly is still in beta form, it works well and the developers are responsive to any questions – so there isn’t much more to say but give it a try yourself, doing so won’t cost you anything and you can see how useful plotly is for yourself. And if you enjoyed this article, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop”.

visit tronixlabs.com

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in API, arduino, ethernet, plotly, tronixstuff, tutorialComments (0)

Arduino Tutorials – Chapter 30 – twitter

Learn how to tweet from your Arduino.

This is chapter thirty of our huge Arduino tutorial seriesUpdated 16/06/2014

In this article you will learn how to send messages from an Ethernet-enabled Arduino to twitter. For the uninitiated who may be thinking “what is all this twitter nonsense about?”, twitter is a form of microblogging. 

You can create a message with a maximum length of 140 characters, and broadcast this on the twitter service. For people to receive your messages (or tweets) they also need to be a member of twitter and choose to subscribe to your tweets.

Generally people will use the twitter service using one of two methods: either using a web browser, or using the twitter application on a smartphone or tablet computer. For example, here is a typical web browser view:

twitter web browser

… and here is an example of a twitter application running on an Android OS smartphone:

twitter android

The neat thing about twitter on a mobile device is that if your username is mentioned in a tweet, you will be notified pretty well immediately as long as you have mobile data access. More on that later. In some areas, you can set twitter to send tweets from a certain user to your mobile phone via SMS – however if doing so be careful to confirm possible charges to your mobile phone account.

Finally, if you are worried about privacy with regards to your tweets, you can set your account to private and only allow certain people to follow your tweets.

So let’s get started.

First of all – you will need a twitter account. If you do not have one, you can sign up for one here. If you already have a twitter account, you can always open more for other uses – such as an Arduino.

For example, my twitter account is @tronixstuff, but my demonstration machine twitter account is @tronixstuff2. Then I have set my primary account to follow my machine’s twitter account.

Now log into twitter with using the account you will have for your Arduino and visit this page and get yourself a token by following the Step One link. The process will take you through authorising the “tweet library” page to login to your twitter account – this is ok. It will then present you with a long text called a “token”, for example:

twitter oauth token

Save your token somewhere safe, as you will need to insert it into your Arduino sketch. Finally, don’t give it to others as then they will be able to post onto twitter using your account. Next, follow step two from the same page – which involves download and installation of the required Arduino library.

Now for the hardware.

You will need an Arduino Uno or compatible board with an Ethernet shield that uses the W5100 Ethernet controller IC (pretty much all of them) – or consider using a Freetronics EtherTen – as it has everything all on the one board, plus some extras:

Freetronics EtherTen

Furthermore you will need to power the board via the external DC socket – the W5100 IC uses more current than the USB power can supply. A 9V 1A plug pack/wall wart will suffice. Finally it does get hot – so be careful not to touch the W5100 after extended use. In case you’re not sure – this is the W5100 IC:

Wiznet W5100If you’re looking for an Arduino-twitter solution with WiFi, check out the Arduino Yún tutorials.

From this point it would be a good idea to check your hardware is working. To do so, please run the webserver example sketch as explained in chapter sixteen (Ethernet). While you do that, we’ll have a break…

Lop Buri Thailand

Sending your first tweet

If you want your Arduino to send a simple tweet consider the following sketch. We have a simple function tweet() which simply sends a line of text (which has a maximum length of 140 characters). Don’t forget to update your IP address, MAC address and token:

You can check the status of the tweeting via the serial monitor. For example, if the tweet was successful you will see:

arduino twitter success 2014

However if you try to send the same tweet more than once in a short period of time, or another error takes place – twitter will return an error message, for example:

arduino twitter duplicate

And finally if it works, the tweet will appear:

Arduino twitter works 2014

Previously we mentioned that you can be alerted to a tweet by your mobile device. This can be done by putting your own twitter account name in the contents of the tweet.

For example – my normal twitter account is @tronixstuff. If I put the text “@tronixstuff” in the text tweeted by my Arduino’s twitter account – the twitter app on my smartphone will let me know I have been mentioned – as shown in the following video:

You may have noticed in the video that a text message arrived as well – that service is a function of my cellular carrier (Telstra) and may not be available to others. Nevertheless this is a neat way of getting important messages from your Arduino to a smart phone or other connected device.

Sending data in a tweet

So what if you have  a sensor or other device whose data you want to know about via twitter? You can send data generated from an Arduino sketch over twitter without too much effort.

In the following example we’ll send the value from analogue pin zero (A0) in the contents of a tweet. And by adding your twitter @username you will be notified by your other twitter-capable devices:

You may have noticed a sneaky sprintf function in void loop(). This is used to insert the integer analogZero into the character array tweetText that we send with the tweet() function. And the results of the example:

Arduino Twitter Tutorial success

So you can use the previous sketch as a framework to create your own Arduino-powered data twittering machine. Send temperature alerts, tank water levels, messages from an alarm system, or just random tweets to your loved one.

Conclusion

So there you have it, another useful way to send information from your Arduino to the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. Big thanks to @neocat for their work with the twitter  Arduino libraries.

And if you enjoyed the tutorial, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

tronixstuff

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, ethernet, shield, tronixstuff, tutorial, twitterComments (5)

Arduino and the XOBXOB IoT Platform

Introduction

If you’re awake and an Internet user, sooner or later  you’ll come across the concept of the “Internet of Things”. It is the goal of many people and organisations to have everything connected to everything for the exchange of data and the ability to control things. And as time marches on, more systems (or “platforms”) are appearing on the market. Some can be quite complex, and some are very easy to use – and this is where our interests lay. In the past we’ve examined the teleduino system, watched the rise of Ninja Blocks, and other connected devices like the lifx bulb and more.

However the purpose of this article is to demonstrate a new platform – XOBXOB (pronounced “zob-zob”) that gives users (and Arduino users in particular) a method of having remote devices connect with each other and be controlled over the Internet. At the time of writing XOBXOB is still in alpha stage, however you’re free to give it a go. So let’s do that now with Arduino.

Getting Started

You’ll need an Arduino and Ethernet shield – or a combination board such as a Freetronics EtherTen, or a WiFly board from Sparkfun. If you don’t have any Ethernet hardware there is a small application you can download that gives your USB-connected Arduino a link to the XOBXOB service. However before that, visit the XOBXOB homepage and register for an account. From there you can visit the dashboard which has your unique API key and a few controls:

XOBXOB dashboard

Now download the Arduino libraries and copy them into the usual location. If you don’t have an Ethernet shield, also get the “connector” application (available for all three OSs). The connector application is used after uploading the XOBXOB-enabled sketches to your Arduino and links it to the XOBXOB service.

Testing with exanples

Moving on, we’ve started with the basic LED control Ethernet sketch which is included in the XOBXOB library. It’s a fast way to check the system is working and your Internet connection is suitable. When using the examples for the first time (or any other XOBXOB sketch, don’t forget to enter your API key and Ethernet MAC address, for example:

We have the EtherTen connected to the ADSL and control via a cellular phone. It’s set to control digital pin 8 so after inserting an LED it worked first time:

The LED is simply turned on and off by using the ON/OFF panel on the XOBXOB dashboard, and then clicking “SET”. You can also click “GET” to retrieve the status of the digital output. The GET function is useful if more than one person is logged into the dashboard controlling what’s at the other end.

Now for some more fun with the other included example, which controls a MAX7219 LED display driver IC. We used one of the boards from the MAX7219 test a while back, which worked fine with the XOBXOB example in the Arduino library:

If this example doesn’t compile for you, remove the line:

Once operating, this example is surprisingly fun, and could be built into a small enclosure for a simple remote-messaging system.

Controlling your own projects

The functions are explained in the Arduino library guide, which you should download and review. Going back to the LED blink example, you can see how the sketch gets and checks for a new on/off message in the following code:

So instead of the digitalWrite() functions, you can insert whatever you want to happen when the ON/OFF button is used on the XOBXOB dashboard.  For example with the use of a Powerswitch Tail you could control a house light or other device from afar.

If you want to control more than one device from the dashboard, you need to create another XOB. This is done by entering the “advanced” dashboard and clicking “New”. After entering a name for the new XOB it will then appear in the drop-down list in either dashboard page. To then assign that XOB to a new device, it needs to be told to request that XOB by name in the Arduino sketch.

For example, if you created a new XOB called “garagelight” you need to insert the XOB name in the XOB.requestXOB() function in the sketch:

and then it will respond to the dashboard when required. Later on we’ll return to XOBXOB and examine how to upload information from a device to the dashboard, to allow remote monitoring of temperature and other data.

Conclusion

Experimenting with XOBXOB was a lot of fun, and much easier than originally planned. Although only in the beginning stages, I’m sure it can find a use with your hardware and a little imagination. Note that XOBXOB is still in alpha stage and not a finished product. For more information, visit hte XOBXOB website. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, ethernet, etherten, iot, tronixstuff, tutorial, WRL-09954, XOBXOBComments (4)

Interact with Arduino over the Internet with Teleduino

Introduction

[Updated 06/12/2013]

Recently a new method of interacting with an Ethernet-enabled Arduino board and the Internet was brought to my attention – a new system called Teleduino. In this article we test a few of the basic features and see what is possible. Please note that these are my own experiments and that Teleduino is a work in progress. So follow along and see for yourself.

Getting Started

  1. You will need an Arduino Uno (or compatible) board and Ethernet shield with the Wiznet chip – or a Freetronics EtherTen (a much neater solution). Teleduino now supports Arduino Mega and the awesome EtherMega.
  2. Download and install the Teleduino Arduino library. This is available from the resources section of the home page. You will also need to be running Arduino IDE v1.0 or greater.
  3. Request an API key. This identified your particular Arduino from the rest.
  4. Get together some basic electronics components for testing, such as some LEDs and 560R resistors; sources of analog input such as an LDR or TMP36 temperature sensor; and a solderless breadboard.
  5. Don’t forget the Ethernet cable from your Arduino stack to the router!
  6. Finally, some rudimentary knowledge about networking will be useful. (IP address, DHCP, etc.)
The Teleduino system uses pin D8 for a status LED, so you may find connecting one up now useful while experimenting. Connect as such:

Controlling digital outputs

In this example we control an LED, turning it on and off. For demonstration purposes, connect another LED with a resistor to D6 in the same method as shown above. Next, you need to upload a sketch to the Arduino. It is the

which is included with the library examples. Before uploading, you need to make some modifications. The first of these is to add your API key. Go back to the email you received from Teleduino, and click on the link provided. It will take you to a website that shows a byte array variable named byte key[]. You will copy this into the sketch, replacing the same array full of hexadecimal zeros in the sketch – as shown below – with your own:

Next, scroll down to

… and change one of the hexadecimal numbers to 0x00… just in case there is a clash with other addresses on your network. You never know. Finally – depending on your network router, you may need to manually allocate the IP address for your Ethernet shield and/or set the DNS server to use. To do this, scroll down to

where you can change the useDHCP and/or useDNS variables to false, and update those values below. However if you’re not sure, just leave them be unless you need to change them. Finally – upload the sketch to your Arduino, get the hardware together and plug it into the network.

Watch your status LED – it will blink a number of times, depending on the status of things. The blink levels are:

  • 1 blink – initialising
  • 2 blinks – starting network connection
  • 3 blinks – connecting to the Teleduino server
  • 4 blinks – authentication successful
  • 5 blinks – session already exists for supplied key (sometimes happens after a quick restart – will work on next auto-restart)
  • 6 blinks – Invalid or unauthorised key – check your API key is correctly entered in the sketch as described earlier
  • 10 blinks – connection dropped

If all is well, after a minute yours should be on blink level 4, then it will idle back to blink level 1. Now to test the connection with our first command.

You send commands to the Arduino using a set of URLs that will contain various parameters. You will need your API key again for these URLs which is then inserted into the URL. The first will report the version of software on the Arduino. Send

however replace 999999 with your API key (and in all examples shown here). If successful, you should see something similar to the following in the web browser:

However if something is wrong, or there are connection difficulties you will see something like:

Before using digital outputs, and after every reset of the Arduino) you need to set the pin mode for the digital output to control. In our example, we use:

Note that the pin number and mode are set with single digits, as you can see above this is for pin 6, and we use mode=1 for output. You should save this as a bookmark to make life easer later on. When the command has been successfully sent, a message will be shown in the webpage, for example:

Moving forward – you turn the digital output on with the following:

and to turn it off, set the final part of the URL to

Easy. How did you go? It really is amazing to see it work. Now you can control your Arduino from almost anywhere in the world. Again, saving these as bookmarks to make things easier, or a URL shortening service.

At this point you should now have the gist of the Teleduino service and how it is operated.

There is so much more you can do, and currently the list includes (From the author):

  • Reset, ping, get version, get uptime, get free memory.
  • Define pin modes, set digital outputs, set analog outputs, read digital inputs, read analog inputs, or read all inputs with a single API call.
  • Define up to 2 ‘banks’ of shift registers. Each ‘bank’ can contain up to 32 cascaded shift registers, giving a total of 512 digital outputs.
  • Shift register outputs can be set, or merged, and expire times can be set on merges (you could set an output(s) high for X number of milliseconds).
  • Define, and read and write from serial port.
  • Read and write from EEPROM.
  • Define and position up to 6 servos.
  • Set preset values for the above functions, which get set during boot. Preset values are stored in the first 160ish bytes of the EEPROM.

[22/09/2012] New! You can also control the I2C bus – check out this tutorial for more information. For more information check the Teleduino web site, and further tutorials can be found here. Here is a simple example of Teleduino at work – controlling a light switch:

Conclusion

At this moment Teleduino is simple, works and makes a lot of ideas possible. We look forward to making more use of it in future projects, and hope you can as well. Kudos to Nathan Kennedy, and we look forward to seeing Teleduino advance and develop over the future. If all this Arduino is new to you, check out the tutorials.  Thanks to Freetronics for the use of their Ethernet-enabled hardware.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in arduino, ethernet, internet, lesson, remote, teleduino, tutorialComments (10)


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