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Review: Agilent U1177A IR to Bluetooth Adaptor

In this review we examine the new Agilent U1177A infra-red to Bluetooth adaptor for the Agilent  U1272A DMM. You can also use the adaptor with the U1240-series DMMs with the optional adaptor. With some PC or Android device software you can monitor or log data from up to three DMMs. So let’s have a look and see what it’s all about.

Introduction

The adaptor arrives in a small box:

… with the following contents:

It was a relief to see the AAA cells included as we didn’t have any in stock. The yellow document is the China RoHS sheet, and the instructions are short but well detailed. The unit itself is quite small:

To fit the battery or reset the device, the front cover slides open revealing the innards to some degree:

and the rear:

The unit clips soundly to the rear of the DMM, however it does stick out quite a lot:

If you need to leave the meter unattended, you’ll need a level and vibration free surface, as the adaptor can be knocked out relatively easily from the top. The adaptor also blocks the hole at the back which some users may use with a hook or loop for positioning the DMM.

Software and Operation

You can use the U1177 with two platforms – Android and Windows, and we tested both. I’m sure if you have Mac Parallels, etc., that there may be some success there but I haven’t tested them. There are two applications available for Android devices – the mobile logger and mobile meter. You can download them both from the Google Play app – just search for ‘agilent‘, and the results should be

The third app is a game that is somewhat entertaining. We tried the applications on two Android devices – a HTC Velocity running Android 4.0.3 (which failed miserably, the software kept freezing) and a Motorola Xoom MZ601 with Android 3.2. I would say now that the software is marked “Beta” so caveat emptor. The data logging software worked on the Xoom but not the “Agilent Mobile Meter”. Moving forward, the logging software is quite good – you can display a graph, table or statistical value of the incoming data from up to three separate DMMs.

Below is a rough video of using the Xoom with data logging. We first make the Bluetooth connection, then measure resistance of a 1k ohm logarithmic pot, change the view to data table, then stop the logging and email the data. The app can email a .csv file which can be opened with any spreadsheet, etc. Using the app you can label each DMM feed to avoid confusion with the data files in the future.

Using the U1177A with a Windows 7 x64 machine was a lot more successful. You can download the Windows-based software from here (97 MB). After pairing the adaptor with the bluetooth connection software, the Agilent software loads but does not connect. You need to alter the data speed to 19200bps and select the COM port from the drop-down list in the “communication settings” on the left-hand side of the window, as shown below:

You can also use terminal software and AT commands to change the parameters of the U1177A, which is described in the user manual. Moving forward, once connected you can measure and log to your heart’s content. You can display a virtual meter:

8

Or choose a graphing display mode:

9

Note the short drop in value to zero as the graph increased on the far-right of the measurement in the image above. This occurs when the meter is changing range, just as the LCD will blink off then on due to the same phenomenon. Finally, you can also display the data as a table, for example:

10

Finally, you can export the data to a .csv file which can be opened with the usual spreadsheet or text editing software:

11

Using Windows OS Remote Multimeter Use Data Logging Other connection – hyperterminal etc. 

Conclusion

For data logging to a PC that is in Bluetooth range, the U1177A fits the bill. Although you can get a serial to IR cable (and early U1272A owners should have received one when the firmware update was released), the Bluetooth module will certainly be useful when moving around a worksite, or taking remote measurements from extreme temperature or NVH environments. The Android apps need to move out of beta stage – however due to the variety of devices and OS versions in the market this may be a long journey. However considering the price (~Au$52) it is inexpensive enough to keep around just-in-case.

Note – the U1177A was purchased by myself and reviewed without notice. Residing in Australia, ours was purchased from element14.com.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Posted in agilent, android, bluetooth, multimeter, product review, review, test equipment, U1177A, U1272AComments (2)

Kit Review – Snootlab Mémoire SD card/RTC/prototyping shield

Hello Readers

In this article we will examine another product from a bundle sent for review by Snootlab, a Toulouse, France-based company that in their own words:

… designs and develops electronic products with an Open Hardware and Open Source approach. We are particularly specialized in the design of new shields for Arduino. The products we create are licensed under CC BY-SA v3.0 (as shown in documents associated with each of our creations). In accordance with the principles of the definition of Open Source Hardware (OSHW), we have signed it the 10th February 2011. We wish to contribute to the development of the ecosystem of “do it yourself” through original designs of products, uses and events.

Furthermore, all of their products are RoHS compliant and as part of the Open Hardware commitment, all the design files are available from the Snootlab website.

The subject of the review is the Snootlab Mémoire – an SD card data logging shield with on-board DS1307 real time clock [and matching backup battery] and prototyping area. It uses the standard SdFat library to write to normal SD memory cards formatted in FAT16 or FAT32. You can download the library from here. The real time clock IC is an easy to use I2C-interface model, and I have documented its use in great detail in this tutorial.

Once again, shield assembly is simple and quite straightforward. You can download an illustrated assembly guide from here, however it is in French. But everything you need to know is laid out on the PCB silk-screen, or the last page of the instructions. The it arrives in a reusable ESD bag:

… and all the required parts are included – including an IC socket and the RTC backup battery:

… the PCB is thick, with a very detailed silk-screen. Furthermore, it arrives with the SD card and 3.3V LDO (underneath) already pre-soldered – a nice touch:

The order of soldering the components is generally a subjective decision, and in this case I started with the resistors:

… and then worked my way out, but not fitting the battery nor IC until last. Intrestingly, the instructions require the crystal to be tacked down with some solder onto the PCB. Frankly I didn’t think it would withstand the temperature, however it did and all is well:

Which leaves us with a fully-assembled Mémoire shield ready for action:

Please note that a memory card is not included with the kit. If you are following along with your own Mémoire, the first thing to do after inserting the battery, IC and shield into your Arduino board and run some tests to ensure all is well. First thing is to test the DS1307 real-time clock IC. You can use the following sketch from chapter seven of my Arduino tutorial series:

If you are unsure about using I2C, please review my tutorial which can be found here. Don’t forget to update the time and date data in void setup(), and also comment out the setDateDS1307() function and upload the sketch a second time. The sketch output will be found on the serial monitor box – such as:

rtcdemooutput

Those of you familiar with the DS1307 RTC IC know that it can generate a nice 1 Hz pulse. To take advantage of this the SQW pin has an access hole on the PCB, beetween R10 and pin 8 of the IC:

For instruction on how to activate the SQW output, please visit the last section of this tutorial.

The next test is the SD card section of the shield. If you have not already done so, download and install the SdFat libary. Then, in the Arduino IDE, select File > Examples > SdFat > SdFatInfo. Insert the formatted (FAT16/32) SD card into the shield, upload the sketch, then open the serial monitor. You should be presented with something like this:

sdcardinfo

As you can see the sketch has returned various data about the SD card. Finally, let’s log some data. You can deconstruct the excellent example that comes with the SdFat library titled SdFatAnalogLogger (select File > Examples > SdFat > SdFatAnalogLogger). Using the functions:

you can “write” to the SD card in the same way as you would the serial output (that is, the serial monitor).

If you have reached this far without any errors – Congratulations! You’re ready to log. If not, remove the battery, SD card and IC from your shield (you used the IC socket, didn’t you?). Check the polarised components are in correctly, double-check your soldering and then reinsert the IC, shield and battery and try again. If that fails, support is available on the Snootlab website, and there is also a customer forum in French (use Google Translate). However as noted previously the team at Snootlab converse in excellent English and have been easy to contact via email if you have any questions. Stay tuned for the final Snootlab product review.

Snootlab products including the Snootlab Mémoire are available directly from their website. High-resolution images available on flickr.

As always, thank you for reading and I look forward to your comments and so on. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Please subscribe using one of the methods at the top-right of this web page to receive updates on new posts, follow on twitterfacebook, or join our Google Group.

[Disclaimer – the products reviewed in this article are promotional considerations made available by Snootlab]

Posted in arduino, ds1307, education, kit review, snootlabComments (0)


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