Tag Archives: uno

Tutorial – Arduino and ILI9325 colour TFT LCD modules

Learn how to use inexpensive ILI9325 colour TFT LCD modules in chapter fifty of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Introduction

Colour TFT LCD modules just keep getting cheaper, so in this tutorial we’ll show you how to get going with some of the most inexpensive modules we could find. The subject of our tutorial is a 2.8″ 240 x 320 TFT module with the ILI9325 LCD controller chip. If you look in ebay this example should appear pretty easily, here’s a photo of the front and back to help identify it:

There is also the line “HY-TFT240_262k HEYAODZ110510” printed on the back of the module. They should cost less than US$10 plus shipping. Build quality may not be job number one at the factory so order a few, however considering the cost of something similar from other retailers it’s cheap insurance. You’ll also want sixteen male to female jumper wires to connect the module to your Arduino.

Getting started

To make life easier we’ll use an Arduino library “UTFT” written for this and other LCD modules. It has been created by Henning Karlsen and can be downloaded from his website. If you can, send him a donation – this library is well worth it. Once you’ve downloaded and installed the UTFT library, the next step is to wire up the LCD for a test.

Run a jumper from the following LCD module pins to your Arduino Uno (or compatible):

  • DB0 to DB7 > Arduino D0 to D7 respectively
  • RD > 3.3 V
  • RSET > A2
  • CS > A3
  • RW > A4
  • RS > A5
  • backlight 5V > 5V
  • backlight GND > GND

Then upload the following sketch – Example 50.1. You should be presented with the following on your display:

If you’re curious, the LCD module and my Eleven board draws 225 mA of current. If that didn’t work for you, double-check the wiring against the list provided earlier. Now we’ll move forward and learn how to display text and graphics.

Sketch preparation

You will always need the following before void setup():

and in void setup():

with the former command, change orientation to either LANDSCAPE to PORTRAIT depending on how you’ll view the screen. You may need further commands however these are specific to features that will be described below. The function .clrScr() will clear the screen.

Displaying Text

There are three different fonts available with the library. To use them add the following three lines before void setup():

When displaying text you’ll need to define the foreground and background colours with the following:

Where red, green and blue are values between zero and 255. So if you want white use 255,255,255 etc. For some named colours and their RGB values, click here. To select the required font, use one of the following:

Now to display the text use the function:

where text is what you’d like to display, x is the horizontal alignment (LEFT, CENTER, RIGHT) or position in pixels from the left-hand side of the screen and y is the starting point of the top-left of the text. For example, to start at the top-left of the display y would be zero. You can also display a string variable instead of text in inverted commas.

You can see all this in action with the following sketch – Example 50.2, which is demonstrated in the following video:

Furthremore, you can also specify the angle of display, which gives a simple way of displaying text on different slopes. Simply add the angle as an extra parameter at the end:

Again, see the following sketch – Example 50.2a, and the results below:

Displaying Numbers

Although you can display numbers with the text functions explained previously, there are two functions specifically for displaying integers and floats.

You can see these functions in action with the following sketch – Example 50.3, with an example of the results below:

example50p3

Displaying Graphics

There’s a few graphic functions that can be used to create required images. The first is:.

which is used the fill the screen with a certain colour. The next simply draws a pixel at a specified x,y location:

Remember that the top-left of the screen is 0,0. Moving on, to draw a single line, use:

where the line starts at x1,y1 and finishes at x2,y2. Need a rectangle? Use:

where the top-left of the rectangle is x1,y1 and the bottom-right is x2, y2. You can also have rectangles with rounded corners, just use:

instead. And finally, circles – which are quite easy. Just use:

where x,y are the coordinates for the centre of the circle, and r is the radius. For a quick demonstration of all the graphic functions mentioned so far, see Example 50.4 – and the following video:

Displaying bitmap images

If you already have an image in .gif, .jpg or .png format that’s less than 300 KB in size, this can be displayed on the LCD. To do so, the file needs to be converted to an array which is inserted into your sketch. Let’s work with a simple example to explain the process. Below is our example image:

jrt3030

Save the image of the puppy somewhere convenient, then visit this page. Select the downloaded file, and select the .c and Arduino radio buttons, then click “make file”. After a moment or two a new file will start downloading. When it arrives, open it with a text editor – you’ll see it contains a huge array and another #include statement – for example:

cfile

Past the #include statement and the array into your sketch above void setup(). After doing that, don’t be tempted to “autoformat” the sketch in the Arduino IDE. Now you can use the following function to display the bitmap on the LCD:

Where x and y are the top-left coordinates of the image, width and height are the … width and height of the image, and name is the name of the array. Scale is optional – you can double the size of the image with this parameter. For example a value of two will double the size, three triples it – etc. The function uses simple interpolation to enlarge the image, and can be a clever way of displaying larger images without using extra memory. Finally, you can also display the bitmap on an angle – using:

where angle is the angle of rotation and cx/cy are the coordinates for the rotational centre of the image.

The bitmap functions using the example image have been used in the following sketch – Example 50.5, with the results in the following video:

Unfortunately the camera doesn’t really do the screen justice, it looks much better with the naked eye.

What about the SD card socket and touch screen?

The SD socket didn’t work, and I won’t be working with the touch screen at this time.

Conclusion

So there you have it – an incredibly inexpensive and possibly useful LCD module. Thank you to Henning Karlsen for his useful library, and if you found it useful – send him a donation via his page.

LEDborder

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Review – LBE “Magpie” Arduino-compatible board

In this article we review the “Magpie” Arduino Uno-compatible board from Little Bird Electronics.

Introduction

We have a new board to review – the “Magpie” board from Little Bird Electronics in Australia. It seems that a new Arduino-compatible board enters the market every week, thanks to the open-source nature of the platform and the availability of rapid manufacturing. However the Magpie isn’t just any old Arduino Uno knock-off, it has something which helps it stand out from the crowd – status LEDs on every digital and analogue I/O pin. You can see them between the stacking header sockets and the silk-screen labels. For example:

topss

and for the curious, the bottom of the Magpie:

bottomss

At first glance you might think “why’d they bother doing that? I could just wire up some LEDs myself”. True. However having them on the board speeds up the debugging process as you can see when an output is HIGH or LOW – and in the case of an input pin, whether a current is present or not. For the curious the LEDs are each controlled by a 2N7002 MOSFET with the gate connected to the I/O pin, for example:

mosfets

An LED will illuminate as long as the gate voltage is higher than the threshold voltage – no matter the status of the particular I/O pin. And if an I/O pin is left floating it may trigger the LED if the threshold voltage is exceeded at the gate. Therefore when using the Magpie it would be a good idea to set all the pins to LOW that aren’t required for your particular sketch. Even if you remove and reapply power the floating will still be prevalent, and indicated visually – for example:

float

Nevertheless you can sort that out in void setup(), and then the benefits of the LEDs become apparent. Consider the following quick demonstration sketch:

… and the results are demonstrated in the following video:

Apart from the LEDs the Magpie offers identical function to that of an Arduino Uno R2 – except the USB microcontroller is an Atmel 16U2 instead of an 8U2, and the USB socket is a mini-USB and not the full-size type.  For the curious you can download the Magpie design files from the product page.

Conclusion

Another Arduino-compatible board. Having those LEDs on the board really does save you if in a hurry to test or check something.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

 The Magpie board used in this article was a promotional consideration supplied by Little Bird Electronics.

Introducing Goldilocks – the Arduino Uno-compatible with 1284p and uSD card

[Update 19/08/2013 – Exciting! Boards are shipping this week – review to follow!]

[Update 19/03/2013 – the project is now fully funded. Initial review here!]

Introduction

It’s a solid fact that there are quite a few variations on the typical Arduino Uno-compatible board. You can get them with onboard wireless, GSM, Zigbee and more – however all with their own issues and specific purposes. But what if you wanted a board that was physically and electrically compatible with an Arduino Uno – but with much more SRAM, more EEPROM, more flash, more speed – and then some? Well that (hopefully) will be a possibility with the introduction of the “Goldilocks” board on Pozible by Phillip Stevens.

What’s Pozible?

Pozible is the Australian version of Kickstarter. However just like KS anyone with a credit card or PayPal can pledge and support projects.

What’s a Goldilocks board?

It’s a board based around the Atmel ATmega1284p microcontroller in an Arduino Uno-compatible physical board with a microSD card socket and a few extras. The use of the ‘1284p gives us the following advantages over the Arduino Uno, including:

  • 16 kByte SRAM = 8x Uno SRAM – so that’s much more space for variables used in sketches – great for applications that use larger frame buffers such as Ethernet and image work;
  • 2 kByte EEPROM = 2 x Uno EEPROM – giving you more space for non-volatile data storage on the main board;
  • 128 kByte flash memory = 4 x Uno – giving you much, much more room for those larger sketches;
  • Two programmable USARTS – in other words, two hardware serial ports – no mucking about with SoftwareSerial and GSM or GPS shields;
  • Timer 3 – the ‘1284p microcontroller has an extra 16-bit timer – timer 3, that is not present on any other ATmega microcontroller. Timer 3 does not have PWM outputs (unlike Timer 0, Timer 1, and Timer 2), and therefore is free to use as a powerful internal Tick counter, for example in a RTOS. freeRTOS has already been modified to utilise this Timer 3;
  • JTAG interface – yes – allowing more advanced developers the opportunity to debug their code;
  • better PWM access – the 1284p brings additional 8-bit Timer 2 PWM outputs onto PD, which creates the option for 2 additional PWM options on this port. It also removes the sharing of the important 16-bit PWM pins with the SPI interface, by moving them to PD4 & PD5, thus simplifying interface assignments;
  • Extra I/O pins – the 1284p has additional digital I/O pins on the PB port. These pins could be utilised for on-board Slave Select pins (for example), without stealing on-header digital pins and freeing the Arduino Pin 10 for Shield SPI SS use exclusively;

Furthermore the following design improvements over an Arduino Uno:

  • adding through-holes for all I/O – allowing you to solder directly onto the board whilst keeping header sockets;
  • replicate SPI and I2C for ease of use;
  • microSD card socket – that’s a no-brainer;
  • link the ATmega16u2 and ATmega1284p SPI interfaces – this will allow the two devices to work in concert for demanding multi-processing applications, involving USB and other peripherals;
  • Fully independent analogue pins, including seperate AVCC and GND – helps reduce noise on the ADC channels for improved analogue measurement accuracy;
  • move the reset button to the edge of the board – another no-brainer
  • clock the board at 20 MHz – that’s an extra 4 MHz over a Uno. And the use of a through hole precision crystal (not a SMD resonator) allows the use of after market timing choices, eg 22.1184 MHz for more accurate UART timings.

What does it look like? 

At the moment the board mock-up looks like this:

If funding is successful (and we hope it will be) the Goldilocks will be manufactured by the team at Freetronics. Apart from being a world-leader in Arduino-compatible hardware and systems, they’re the people behind the hardware for Ardusat and more – so we know the Goldilocks will be in good hands.

Will it really be compatible?

Yes – the Goldilocks will be shipped pre-programmed with an Arduino compatible boot-loader, and the necessary Board description files will be available to provide a 100% compatible Arduino IDE experience.

Conclusion

If you think this kind of board would be useful in your projects, you want to support a good project – or both, head over to Pozible and make your pledge. And for the record – I’ve put my money where my mouth is 🙂

Please note that I’m not involved in nor responsible for the Goldilocks project, however I’m happy to promote it as a worthwhile endeavour. In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

First Look – the Arduino Leonardo

Introduction

Recently the Arduino Leonardo was released, and I’ve finally got my hands on one. Some have claimed that the Leonardo as the successor to the Arduino Uno board, however that is somewhat subjective.  In this article we have a look for ourselves and examine the differences between the Uno boards that we’re used to and the new Leonardo.

The board

Here it is unwrapped from the cardboard packet:

It uses the same physical footprint as the Uno, so no surprises there:

 Now to travel around the board and see what’s new. First is the microcontroller – we have the Atmel ATmega32U4:

There are several pros and cons to using the 32U4. The pros include:

  • More analogue inputs. As well as the usual A0~A5, digital pins 4,6,8,9,10 and 12 can be configured as A6~A11
  • It handles USB. So no more external USB controller MCU or the old FTDI chip. Supposedly this saves money, however the retail price in some markets don’t reflect this
  • More PWM pins – well one more. They’re now on D3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11 and 13
  • There is a little more SRAM than the Uno, it is now 2.5 kB
  • SPI has moved – they’re now wired to the ICSP pins. So you now have D10~D13 seperate to SPI
And the cons:
  • SPI has moved – they’re now wired to the ICSP pins. So if you have any shields that use SPI – too bad, they’re out. The most common example of this will be Ethernet shields – you’ll need to modify them with some jumper leads to contact the ICSP pins
  • I2C has moved over to D2+3. So if you have any shields using I2C – they’ll need to be modified
  • Less flash memory – the bootloader uses 4 kB of the 32 kB flash (the Uno used 0.5 kB)

However you can get an adaptor shield to use older Arduino shields with the Leonardo.

For MCU to Arduino pin mapping, see here. Next, for more on the USB side of things – as the 32U4 takes care of USB – take heed of the following notes from arduino.cc:

Since the Leonardo does not have a dedicated chip to handle serial communication, it means that the serial port is virtual— it’s a software routine, both on your operating system, and on the Leonardo itself. Just as your computer creates an instance of the serial port driver when you plug in any Arduino, the Leonardo creates a serial instance whenever it runs its bootloader. The Leonardo is an instance of USB’s Connected Device Class (CDC) driver.

This means that every time you reset the board, the Leonardo’s USB serial connection will be broken and re-established. The Leonardo will disappear from the list of serial ports, and the list will re-enumerate. Any program that has an open serial connection to the Leonardo will lose its connection. This is in contrast to the Arduino Uno, with which you can reset the main processor (the ATmega328P) without closing the USB connection (which is maintained by the secondaryATmega8U2 or ATmega16U2 processor).

There are some other changes to the board. Moving on, the next change is the USB socket. Do you recognise this socket?

Yes – micro USB. Thankfully (!) a growing number of mobile phones use this type for charging and USB connection, so you may already have a matching cable. Note that the Leonardo doesn’t include a cable, so if you’re an iPhone user – order yourself a cable with your Leonardo.

Next, the LEDs have been moved to the edge of the board. You can see them in the above image to the right of the USB socket. No more squinting through shields at strange angles to check the TX/RX lights. However this isn’t a new invention, our friends at Freetronics have been doing this for some time. Furthermore, the reset button has been moved to the corner for easier access.

There are also seperate connectors for the I2C bus – next to AREF, which should make modifying existing shields a little easier:

 Finally, due to the reduction in components and shift to SMD – there is what could almost be called a large waste of space on the board:

A few extra user LEDs wouldn’t have been a bad idea, or perhaps circuitry to support Li-Po rechargeable batteries. However the argument will be “that’s what a protoshield is for”. Just saying… As for the rest of the hardware, the specifications can be found here.

Finally, the Leonardo is available in two versions – with and without headers. This makes it easier to embed the Leonardo into fixed applications as you can directly solder to the various I/O pins. An alternative to this would instead be the Freetronics LeoStick, as it is much smaller yet fully compatible.

Software

First – you need to drag yourself into Arduino IDE v1.0.1. Note you can run more than one version of the IDE on the same machine if you don’t mind sharing the same preferences file. Next, the Leonardo doesn’t reset when you open the serial monitor window (from arduino.cc) –

That means you won’t see serial data that’s already been sent to the computer by the board, including, for example, most data sent in the setup() function. This change means that if you’re using any Serial print(), println() or write() statments in your setup, they won’t show up when you open the serial monitor. To work around this, you can check to see if the serial port is open like so:

Using the 32U4, you also have two serial ports. The first is the emulated one via the USB, and the second is the hardware UART on digital pins 0 and 1. Furthermore, the Leonardo can emulate a USB keyboard and mouse – however with a few caveats. There is a section on the Leonardo homepage that you should really read and take note of. But this emulation does sound interesting, and we look forward to developing some interesting tools to take use of them, so stay tuned.

Conclusion

There is nothing wrong with the Leonardo board, it works as described. However you could consider this a virtual “line in the sand”, or a new beginning. Due to the changes in the pinouts shields will need to be redesigned, and for those of you still programming in Arduino v23 – it’s time to get up to speed with v1.0.1. If you need the special USB functions, keyboard and/or mouse emulation, or are happy with the changes and can get one for less than the cost of a Uno – great.

Here’s a video from the main man Massimo Banzi:

However if you’re looking for your first Arduino board – this isn’t the board for you right now. There are too many incompatible shields out there, and the inability to cheaply replace the microcontroller will see some beginners burn out their first couple of boards rendering them useless. Get yourself an Arduino Uno or compatible board such as the Freetronics Eleven.

In conclusion, classifying the Leonardo board as good or bad is not a simple decision. It may or may not be an improvement – depending on your needs. Right now – for beginners, this is not the board for you. For those who understand the differences between a Uno and Leonardo, sure – no problem. Frankly, I would get a LeoStick instead.  At the end – it’s up to you to make an informed decision.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Arduino and FFD51 Incandescent Displays

In this article we examine another style of vintage display technology – the incandescent seven-segment digital display. We are using the FFD51 by the IEE company (data sheet.pdf) – dating back to the early 1970s. Here is a close-up of our example:

You can see the filaments for each of the segments, as well as the small coiled ‘decimal point’ filament at the top-right of the image above.  This model has pins in a typical DIP format, making use in a solderless breadboard or integration into a PCB very simple:

It operates in a similar manner to a normal light bulb – the filaments are in a vacuum, and when a current is applied the filament glows nicely. The benefit of using such as display is their brightness – they could be read in direct sunlight, as well as looking good inside.  At five volts each segment draws around 30mA. For demonstration purposes I have been running them at a lower voltage (3.5~4V), as they are old and I don’t want to accidentally burn out any of the elements.

Using these with an Arduino is very easy as they segments can be driven from a 74HC595 shift register using logic from Arduino digital out pins. (If you are unfamiliar with doing so, please read chapters four and five of my tutorial series). For my first round of experimenting, a solderless breadboard was used, along with the usual Freetronics board and some shift register modules:

Although the modules are larger than a DIP 74HC595, I like to use these instead. Once you solder in the header pins they are easier to insert and remove from breadboards, have the pinouts labelled clearly, are almost impossible to physically damage, have a 100nF capacitor for smoothing and a nice blue LED indicating power is applied.

Moving forward – using four shift register modules and displays, a simple four-digit circuit can be created. Note from the datasheet that all the common pins need to be connected together to GND. Otherwise you can just connect the outputs from the shift register (Q0~Q7) directly to the display’s a~dp pins.

Some of you may be thinking “Oh at 30mA a pin, you’re exceeding the limits of the 74HC595!”… well yes, we are. However after several hours they still worked fine and without any heat build-up. However if you displayed all eight segments continuously there may be some issues. So take care. As mentioned earlier we ran the displays at a lower voltage (3.5~4V) and they still displayed nicely. Furthermore at the lower voltage the entire circuit including the Arduino-compatible board used less than 730mA with all segments on –  for example:

 For the non-believers, here is the circuit in action:

Here is the Arduino sketch for the demonstration above:

Now for the prototype of something more useful – another clock. 🙂 Time to once again pull out my Arduino-compatible board with onboard DS1307 real-time clock. For more information on the RTC IC and getting time data with an Arduino please visit chapter twenty of my tutorials. For this example we will use the first two digits for the hours, and the last two digits for minutes. The display will then rotate to showing the numerical day and month of the year – then repeat.

Operation is simple – just get the time from the DS1307, then place the four digits in an array. The elements of the array are then sent in reverse order to the shift registers. The procedure is repeated for the date. Anyhow, here is the sketch:

and the clock in action:

So there you have it – another older style of technology dragged into the 21st century. If you enjoyed this article you may also like to read about vintage HP LED displays. Once again, I hope you found this article of interest. Thanks to the Vintage Technology Association website for background information.

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Initial Review: Akafugu Akafuino-X Microcontroller Board

Hello Readers

Time to get back to work for 2012 and in doing so we review another interesting product from a new company based in Japan – akafugu. From their website:

Akafugu Corporation is a small electronics company that operates out of Tokyo, Japan. We specialize in fun and easy to use electronic gadgets. Our goal is to provide products that not only make prototyping faster and easier, but are also perfect for incorporation in finalized products.

And with this in mind we examine the Akafuino-X microcontroller board:

akafuino-x-1

The observant among you will notice the similarity to our usual Arduino Uno and compatible boards. However there are some differences which bring changes and improvements over the original Arduino design. The biggest point of difference is the microcontroller, the Akafuino uses an Atmel XMega32A4. The benefit of this over the normal ATmega328 is:

  • Speed! 32 MHz – twice as fast as the ATmega328;
  • Two-channel DAC (digital to analogue) converter – output analogue signals between 0V and Vcc straight from the board. A library is included with the new IDE to control them. The DAC uses digital pins seven and eight;
  • Not one, two or even four, but five UARTs;
  • Two I2C buses;
  • Sixteen PWM pins – great for LED effects…

Thankfully the designers have detailed the extra I/O pins and other useful information on the rear of the board:

akafuino-x-2

Other changes include:

  • It’s a 3.3V board – so no 5V supply for you. However the inputs are tolerant to 5V;
  • On-board real time clock. You can also add an optional 32.768 kHz crystal to increase accuracy – see the space on the board near the reset pin;
  • A very refreshing red colour (note that ‘aka(i)’ ** is red in Japanese) and a happy puffer fish (‘fugu’) on the silk-screening 🙂
  • And libraries for other Akafugu products such as the TWI Display module are available.

Getting started is easy, however due to the difference in hardware the Arduino IDE needs modification. But don’t panic – instead of modifying your existing v1.0 Arduino IDE – download and install the Akafuino-X version from here and run your usual and the Akauino-X IDE on the same machine (it’s ok to do this). You should also review the usage instructions here and note that this is a derivative of the v1.0 IDE. Furthermore at the time of writing the software side of things is still in beta, and can be monitored via Github – however don’t let this put you off, as the Akafuino-X has a lot of potential.

If you find any bugs in use the issue tracker in Github to let the team know.

In the meanwhile we’ve conducted a quick speed test – by running the same sketch on an Arduino Uno and also the Akafuino-X. The test is a whole lot of multiplication, nothing too scientific. At the end the duration of the exercise is shown in milliseconds. Here’s the code:

And here are the results of running the sketch four times on each board:

speedtest

Our Akafuino-X beta only took 2704ms versus the Arduino Uno taking 4212ms. Very good so far.

Update! The team at akafugu have been experimenting with overclocking the Akafuino-X. And also check out the errata page

So there you have it, another contender in the Arduino-compatible board stakes. Considering the extra  I/O, PWM and bus connectivity the Akafuino-X is a very capable board. I look forward to the evolution of the IDE and will return with the Akafuino-X in an upcoming project. And we also have one to give away. So stay tuned! In the meanwhile the Akafuino-X and other goodies are available directly from akafugu.jp

Disclaimer – The parts reviewed in this article are a promotional consideration made available by akafugu.

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

** Yes I know it’s an i-type adjective

Tutorial: Arduino and multiple thumbwheel switches

This is an addendum to chapter forty of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – a series of articles on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here. Any files from tutorials will be found here.

Updated 24/11/2012

This article continues with the push-wheel switches introduced in chapter 40. In the previous article, we learned how to read the value of a single digit using the digital pins of our Arduino. With this instalment we will examine how to read four digits – and not waste all those digital pins in the process. Instead, we will use the Microchip MCP23017 16-bit port expander IC that communicates via the I2C bus. It has sixteen digital input/output pins that we can use to read the status of each switch.

Before moving forward, please note that some assumed knowledge is required for this article – the I2C bus (parts one and two) and the MCP23017.

We first will describe the hardware connections, and then the Arduino sketch. Recall the schematic used for the single switch example:

ex40p1_schem

When the switch was directly connected to the Arduino, we read the status of each pin to determine the value of the switch. We will do this again, on a larger scale using the MCP23017. Consider the pinout diagram:

We have 16 pins, which allows four switches to be connected. The commons for each switch still connect to 5V, and each switch contact still has a 10k pull-down resistor to GND. Then we connect the 1,2,4,8 pins of digit one to GPBA0~3; digit two’s 1,2,4,8 to GPA4~7; digit three’s 1,2,4,8 to GPB0~3 and digit four’s 1,2,4,8 to GPB4~7. For demonstration purposes we are using the Gravitech 7-segment shield as reviewed in the past.

Now how do we read the switches? All those wires may cause you to think it is difficult, but the sketch is quite simple. When we read the value of GPBA and B, one byte is returned for each bank, with the most-significant bit first. Each four bits will match the setting of the switch connected to the matching I/O pins.

For example, if we request the data for both IO banks and the switches are set to 1 2 3 4 – bank A will return 0010 0001 and bank B will return 0100 0011. We use some bitshift operations to separate each four bits into a separate variable – which leaves us with the value of each digit. For example, to separate the value of switch four, we shift the bits from bank B >> 4. This pushes the value of switch three out, and the blank bits on the left become zero. To separate the value for switch three, we use a compound bitwise & – which leaves the value of switch three.

Below is a breakdown of the binary switch values – it shows the raw GPIOA and B byte values, then each digit’s binary value, and decimal value:

So let’s see the demonstration sketch :

And for the non-believers … a video demonstration:

So there you have it. Four digits instead of one, and over the I2C bus conserving Arduino digital I/O pins. Using eight MCP23017s you could read 32 digits at once. Have fun with doing that!

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Tutorial: Maximising your Arduino’s I/O ports with MCP23017

This is chapter forty-one of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – a series of articles on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

[Updated 04/12/2014]

In this article we discuss how to use the Microchip MCP23017 16-bit serial expander with I2C serial interface. This 28-pin IC offers sixteen inputs or outputs – and up to eight of the ICs can be used on one I2C bus… offering a maximum of 128 extra I/O ports. A few people may be thinking “Why not just get an Arduino Mega2560?” – a good question. However you may have a distance between the Arduino and the end-point of the I/O pins – so with these ICs you can run just four wires instead of a lot more; save board space with custom designs, and preserve precious digital I/O pins for other uses. Plus I think the I2C bus is underappreciated! So let’s get started…

Here is our subject of the article in DIP form:

At this point you should also download yourself a copy of data sheet – it will be referred to several times, and very useful for reference and further reading. Furthermore if you are not familiar with Arduino and the I2C bus, please familiarise yourself with the I2C tutorials parts one and two. The MCP23017 can be quite simple or complex to understand, so the goal of this article is to try and make it as simple as possible. After reading this you should have the knowledge and confidence to move forward with using a MCP23017.

First, let’s look at the hardware basics of this IC. Consider the pinouts:

The sixteen I/O ports are separated into two ‘ports’ – A (on the right) and B (on the left. Pin 9 connects to 5V, 10 to GND, 11 isn’t used, 12 is the I2C bus clock line (Arduino Uno/Duemilanove analogue pin 5, Mega pin  21), and 13 is the I2C bus data line (Arduino Uno/Duemailnove analogue pin 4, Mega pin 20). External pull-up resistors should be used on the I2C bus – in our examples we use 4.7k ohm values. Pin 14 is unused, and we won’t be looking at interrupts, so ignore pins 19 and 20. Pin 18 is the reset pin, which is normally high – therefore you ground it to reset the IC. So connect it to 5V!

Finally we have the three hardware address pins 15~17. These are used to determine the I2C bus address for the chip. If you connect them all to GND, the address is 0x20. If you have other devices with that address or need to use multiple MCP23017s, see figure 1-2 on page eight of the data sheet. You can alter the address by connecting a combination of pins 15~17 to 5V (1) or GND (0). For example, if you connect 15~17 all to 5V, the control byte becomes 0100111 in binary, or 0x27 in hexadecimal.

Next, here is a basic schematic illustrating how to connect an MCP23017 to a typical Arduino board. It contains the minimum to use the IC, without any sensors or components on the I/O pins:

Now to examine how to use the IC in our sketches.

As you should know by now most I2C devices have several registers that can be addressed. Each address holds one byte of data that determines various options. So before using we need to set whether each port is an input or an output. First, we’ll examine setting them as outputs. So to set port A to outputs, we use:

Then to set port B to outputs, we use:

So now we are in void loop()  or a function of your own creation and want to control some output pins. To control port A, we use:

To control port B, we use:

… replacing ?? with the binary or equivalent hexadecimal or decimal value to send to the register.

To calculate the required number, consider each I/O pin from 7 to 0 matches one bit of a binary number – 1 for on, 0 for off. So you can insert a binary number representing the status of each output pin. Or if binary does your head in, convert it to hexadecimal. Or a decimal number. So for example, you want pins 7 and 1 on. In binary that would be 10000010, in hexadecimal that is 0x82, or 130 decimal. (Using decimals is convenient if you want to display values from an incrementing value or function result).

If you had some LEDs via resistors connected to the outputs, you would have this as a result of sending 0x82:

For example, we want port A to be 11001100 and port B to be 10001000 – so we send the following (note we converted the binary values to decimal):

… with the results as such (port B on the left, port A on the right):

Now let’s put all of this output knowledge into a more detailed example. From a hardware perspective we are using a circuit as described above, with the addition of a 560 ohm resistor followed by an LED thence to ground from on each of the sixteen outputs. Here is the sketch:

And here is the example blinking away:

Although that may have seemed like a simple demonstration, it was created show how the outputs can be used. So now you know how to control the I/O pins set as outputs. Note that you can’t source more than 25 mA of current from each pin, so if switching higher current loads use a transistor and an external power supply and so on.

Now let’s turn the tables and work on using the I/O pins as digital inputs. The MCP23017 I/O pins default to input mode, so we just need to initiate the I2C bus. Then in the void loop() or other function all we do is set the address of the register to read and receive one byte of data.

For our next example, we have our basic sketch as described at the start of this article using four normally-open buttons (once again using the ‘button board‘) which are connected to port B inputs 0~3. Consider the first five lines of void loop() in the following example:

In this example void loop() sends the GPIOB address (0x13) to the IC. Then using Wire.requestFrom() it asks for one byte of data from the IC – the contents of the register at 0x13. This byte is stored in the variable inputs. Finally if inputs is greater than zero (i.e. a button has been pressed) the result is sent to the serial monitor window and displayed in binary. We display it in binary as this represents the state of the inputs 0~7. Here is an example of pressing the buttons 1, 2, 3 then 4 – three times:

And as we are reading eight inputs at once – you can detect multiple keypresses. The following is an example of doing just that:

As you can see pressing all four buttons returned 1111, or the first and third returned 101. Each combination of highs and lows on the inputs is a unique 8-bit number that can also be interpreted in decimal or hexadecimal. And if you wanted to read all sixteen inputs at once, just request and store two bytes of data instead of one.

For our last example – a demonstration of using port A as outputs and port B as inputs. Four LEDs with matching resistors are connected to port A outputs 0~3, with the buttons connected as per example 41.2. Here is the sketch:

By now there shouldn’t be any surprises in the last example – it receives a byte that represents port B, and sends that byte out to port A to turn on the matching outputs and LEDs. For the curious, here it is in action:

So there you have it… another way to massively increase the quantity of digital I/O pins on any Arduino system by using the I2C bus. You can get the MCP23017 from Tronixlabs.

visit tronixlabs.com

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Tutorial: Arduino and Thumbwheel switches

This is chapter forty of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – a series of articles on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here. Any files from tutorials will be found here.

[Updated 20/01/13]

In this article we go back to the past via the use of push-wheel/thumbwheel switches with out Arduino systems. Here are some examples sourced from somewhere on eBay:

For the uninitiated, each switch is one vertical segment and they can be connected together to form various sizes. You can use the buttons to select from digits zero through to nine. There are alternatives available that have a wheel you can move with your thumb instead of the increase/decrease buttons. Before the days of fancy user interfaces these switches were quite popular methods for setting numerical data entry. However they are still available today, so let’s see how they work and how we can use them. The switch’s value is made available via binary-coded decimal. Consider the rear of the switch:

We have common on the left, then contacts for 1, 2, 4 and 8. If you apply a small voltage (say 5V) to common, the value of the switch can be measured by adding the values of the contacts that are in the HIGH state. For example, if you select 3 – contacts 1 and 2 will be at the voltage at common. The values between zero and nine can be represented as such:

bcdtable

By now you should realise that it would be easy to read the value of a switch – and you’re right, it is. We can connect 5V to the common,  the outputs to digital input pins of our Arduino boards, then use digitalRead() to determine the value of each output. In the sketch we use some basic mathematics to convert the BCD value to a decimal number. So let’s do that now.

From a hardware perspective, we need to take into account one more thing – the push-wheel switch behaves electrically like four normally-open push buttons. This means we need to use pull-down resistors in order to have a clear difference between high and low states. So the schematic for one switch would be (click image to enlarge):

ex40p1_schem

Now it is a simple matter to connect the outputs labelled 1, 2, 4, and 8 to (for example) digital pins 8, 9, 10 and 11. Connect 5V to the switch ‘C’ point, and GND to … GND. Next, we need to have a sketch that can read the inputs and convert the BCD output to decimal. Consider the following sketch:

The function readSwitch()  is the key. It calculates the value of the switch by adding the numerical representation of each switch output and returns the total as its result. For this example we used a numerical display shield that is controlled by the NXP SAA1064. If you don’t have one, that’s ok – the results are also sent to the serial monitor. Now, let’s see it in action:

Ok it doesn’t look like much, but if you need numerical entry it saves a lot of physical space and offers a precise method of entry.

So there you have it. Would you actually use these in a project? For one digit – yes. For four? Probably not – perhaps it would be easier to use a 12-digit keypad. There’s an idea…  But for now I hope you enjoyed reading this as much as I did writing it for you.

Update! See the addendum for using four switches at once to read four-digit numbers here

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Tutorial: Arduino and the NXP SAA1064 4-digit LED display driver

Learn how to use the NXP SAA1064 LED display driver IC in chapter thirty-nine of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – a series of articles on the Arduino universe.

Updated 19/01/2013

In this article we investigate controlling the NXP (formerly Philips) SAA1064 4-digit LED display driver IC with Arduino and the I2C bus interface. If you are not familiar with using the I2C bus, please read my tutorials (parts one and two) before moving on. Although the SAA1064 is not the newest on the market, it is still popular, quite inexpensive and easy to source. Furthermore as it is controlled over the I2C bus – you don’t waste any digital I/O pins on your Arduino, and you can also operate up to four SAA1064s at once (allowing 16 digits!). Finally, it has a constant-current output – keeping all the segments of your LED display at a constant brightness (which is also adjustable).  So let’s get started…

Here is an example of the SAA1064 in SOIC surface mount packaging:

It measures around 15mm in length. For use in a solderless breadboard, I have soldered the IC onto a through-hole adaptor:

The SAA1064 is also available in a regular through-hole DIP package. At this point, please download the data sheet (.pdf) as you will need to refer to it during the article. Next, our LED display examples. We need common-anode displays, and for this article we use two Agilent HDSP521G two-digit modules (data sheet [.pdf]) as shown below:

For the uninitiated – a common anode display has all the segments’ anodes connected together, with the cathodes terminated separately. For example, our LED displays are wired as such:

Notice the anodes for the left digit are pin 14, and the right digit pin 13. A device that is connected to all the cathodes (e.g. our SAA1064) will control the current flow through each element – thereby turning each segment on (and controlling the brightness) or off. Our SAA1064 is known as a current-sink as the current flows through the LED, and then sinks into the IC.

Now, let’s get it connected. There is an excellent demonstration circuit on page twelve of the data sheet that we will follow for our demonstrations:

It looks pretty straight-forward, and it is. The two transistors are standard NPN-type, such as PN2222. The two transistors are used to each turn on or off a pair of digits – as the IC can only drive digits 1+3 or 2+4 together. (When presented in real life the digits are numbered 4-3-2-1). So the pairs are alternatively turned on and off at a rapid rate, which is controlled by the capacitor between pin 2 and GND. The recommended value is 2.7 nF. At the time of writing, I didn’t have that value in stock, so chose a 3.3 nF instead. However due to the tolerance of the ceramic capacitor it was actually measured to be 2.93 nF:

So close enough to 2.7 nF will be OK. The other capacitor shown between pins 12 and 13 is a standard 0.1 uF smoothing capacitor. Pin 1 on the SAA1064 is used to determine the I2C bus address – for our example we have connected it straight to GND (no resistors at all) resulting in an address of 0x70. See the bottom page five of the data sheet for other address options. Power for the circuit can be taken from your Arduino’s 5V pin – and don’t forget to connect the circuit GND to Arduino GND. You will also use 4.7k ohm pull-up resistors on the SDA and SCL lines of the I2C bus.

The last piece of the schematic puzzle is how to connect the cathodes of the LED displays to the SAA1064. Display pins 14 and 13 are the common anodes of the digits.

The cathodes for the left-hand display module:

  • LED display pins 4, 16, 15, 3, 2, 1, 18 and 17 connect to SAA1064 pins 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16 and 15 respectively (that is, LED pin 4 to IC pin 22, etc.);
  • LED display pins 9, 11, 10, 8, 6, 5, 12 and 7 also connect to SAA1064 pins 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16 and 15 respectively.
The cathodes for the right-hand display module:
  • LED display pins 4, 16, 15, 3, 2, 1, 18 and 17 connect to SAA1064 pins 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 respectively;
  • LED display pins  9, 11, 10, 8, 6, 5, 12 and 7 also connect to SAA1064 pins 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 respectively.
Once your connections have been made, you could end up with spaghetti junction like this…
Now it is time to consider the Arduino sketch to control out SAA1064. Each write request to the SAA1064 requires several bytes. We either send a control command (to alter some of the SAA1064 parameters such as display brightness) or a display command (actually display numbers). For our example sketches the I2C bus address “0x70 >> 1” is stored in the byte variable saa1064. First of all, let’s look at sending commands, as this is always done first in a sketch to initiate the SAA1064 before sending it data.
As always, we send the address down the I2C bus to awaken the SAA1064 using

Then the next byte is the instruction byte. If we send zero:

… the IC expects the next byte down the bus to be the command byte. And finally our command byte:

The control bits are described on page six of the data sheet. However – for four-digit operation bits 0, 1 and 2 should be 1; bit 3 should be 0; and bits 4~6 determine the amount of current allowed to flow through the LED segments. Note that they are cumulative, so if you set bits 5 and 6 to 1 – 18 mA of current will flow. We will demonstrate this in detail later on.

Next, to send actual numbers to be displayed is slightly different. Note that the digits are numbered (from left to right) 4 3 2 1. Again, we first send the address down the I2C bus to awaken the SAA1064 using

Then the next byte is the instruction byte. If we send 1, the next byte of data will represent digit 1. If that follows with another byte, it will represent digit 2. And so on. So to send data to digit 1, send

Although sending binary helps with the explanation, you can send decimal equivalents. Next, we send a byte for each digit (from right to left). Each bit in the byte represents a single LED element of the digit as well as the decimal point. Note how the elements are labelled (using A~G and DP) in the following image:

The digit bytes describe which digit elements to turn on or off. The bytes are described as such: Bpgfedcba. (p is the decimal point). So if you wanted to display the number 7, you would send B00000111 – as this would turn on elements a, b and c. To add the decimal point with 7 you would send B10000111. You can also send the byte as a decimal number. So to send the digit 7 as a decimal, you would send 7 – as 00000111 in base-10 is 7. To include the decimal point, send 135 – as 100000111 in base-10 is 135. Easy! You can also create other characters such as A~F for hexadecimal. In fact let’s do that now in the following example sketch:

In the function initDisplay() you can see an example of using the instruction then the control byte. In the function clearDisplay() you can see the simplest form of sending digits to the display – we send 0 for each digit to turn off all elements in each digit. The bytes that define the digits 0~9 and A~F are stored in the array digits[]. For example, the digit zero is 63 in decimal, which is B00111111 in binary – which turns on elements a,b,c,d,e and f. Finally, notice the second loop in displayDigits() – 128 is added to each digit value to turn on the decimal point. Before moving on, let’s see it in action:

Our next example revisits the instruction and control byte – we change the brightness of the digits by setting bits 4~6 in the control byte. Each level of brightness is separated into a separate function, and should be self-explanatory. Here is the sketch:

And again, see it in action:

For our final example, there is a function displayInteger(a,b) which can be used to easily display numbers from 0~9999 on the 4-digit display. The parameter a is the number to display, and b is the leading-zero control – zero – off, one – on. The function does some maths on the integet to display and separates the digits for each column, then sends them to the SAA1064 in reverse order. By now you should be able to understand the following sketch:

And the final example in action:

So there you have it – another useful IC that can be used in conjunction with our Arduino systems to make life easier and reduce the required digital output pins.

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