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0.96" 80 x 160 Full Color IPS LCD Module from PMD Way with free delivery worldwide

Tutorial – Using the 0.96″ 80 x 160 Full Color IPS LCD Module with Arduino

The purpose of this guide is to get your 0.96″ color LCD display successfully operating with your Arduino, so you can move forward and experiment and explore further types of operation with the display. This includes installing the Arduino library, making a succesful board connection and running a demonstration sketch.

Although you can use the display with an Arduino Uno or other boad with an ATmega328-series microcontroller – this isn’t recommended for especially large projects. The library eats up a fair amount of flash memory – around 60% in most cases.

So if you’re running larger projects we recommend using an Arduino Mega or Due-compatible board due to the increased amount of flash memory in their host microcontrollers.

Installing the Arduino library

So let’s get started. We’ll first install the Arduino library then move on to hardware connection and then operating the display.

(As the display uses the ST7735S controller IC, you may be tempted to use the default TFT library included with the Arduino IDE – however it isn’t that reliable. Instead, please follow the instructions below). 

First – download the special Arduino library for your display and save it into your Downloads or a temp folder.

Next – open the Arduino IDE and select the Sketch > Include Library > Add .ZIP library option as shown below:

libraryinstall

A dialog box will open – navigate to and select the zip file you downloaded earlier. After a moment or two the IDE will then install the library.

Please check that the library has been installed – to do this, select the Sketch > Include Library option in the IDE and scroll down the long menu until you see “ER-TFTM0.96-1” as shown below:

libraryinstalled

Once that has been successful, you can wire up your display.

Connecting the display to your Arduino

The display uses the SPI data bus for communication, and is a 3.3V board. You can use it with an Arduino or other 5V board as the logic is tolerant of higher voltages.

Arduino to Display

GND ----- GND (GND)
3.3V ---- Vcc (3.3V power supply)
D13 ----- SCL (SPI bus clock)
D11 ----- SDA (SPI bus data out from Arduino)
D10 ----- CS (SPI bus "Chip Select")
D9 ------ DC (Data instruction select pin)
D8 ------ RES (reset input)

If your Arduino has different pinouts than the Uno, locate the SPI pins for your board and modify as appropriate.

Demonstration sketch

Open a new sketch in the IDE, then copy and paste the following sketch into the IDE:

// https://pmdway.com/products/0-96-80-x-160-full-color-lcd-module
#include <UTFT.h>

// Declare which fonts we will be using
extern uint8_t SmallFont[];

// Initialize display
// Library only supports software SPI at this time
//NOTE: support  DUE , MEGA , UNO 
//SDI=11  SCL=13  /CS =10  /RST=8  D/C=9
UTFT myGLCD(ST7735S_4L_80160,11,13,10,8,9);    //LCD:  4Line  serial interface      SDI  SCL  /CS  /RST  D/C    NOTE:Only support  DUE   MEGA  UNO

// Declare which fonts we will be using
extern uint8_t BigFont[];

int color = 0;
word colorlist[] = {VGA_WHITE, VGA_BLACK, VGA_RED, VGA_BLUE, VGA_GREEN, VGA_FUCHSIA, VGA_YELLOW, VGA_AQUA};
int  bsize = 4;

void drawColorMarkerAndBrushSize(int col)
{
  myGLCD.setColor(VGA_BLACK);
  myGLCD.fillRect(25, 0, 31, 239);
  myGLCD.fillRect(myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-31, 161, myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-1, 191);
  myGLCD.setColor(VGA_WHITE);
  myGLCD.drawPixel(25, (col*30)+15);
  for (int i=1; i<7; i++)
    myGLCD.drawLine(25+i, ((col*30)+15)-i, 25+i, ((col*30)+15)+i);
  
  if (color==1)
    myGLCD.setColor(VGA_WHITE);
  else
    myGLCD.setColor(colorlist[col]);
  if (bsize==1)
    myGLCD.drawPixel(myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-15, 177);
  else
    myGLCD.fillCircle(myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-15, 177, bsize);
    
  myGLCD.setColor(colorlist[col]);
}
void setup()
{
  randomSeed(analogRead(0));
  
// Setup the LCD
  myGLCD.InitLCD();
  myGLCD.setFont(SmallFont);
}

void loop()
{
  int buf[158];
  int x, x2;
  int y, y2;
  int r;

// Clear the screen and draw the frame
  myGLCD.clrScr();

  myGLCD.setColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 0, 159, 13);
  myGLCD.setColor(64, 64, 64);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 114, 159, 127);
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 255, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.print("pmdway.com.", CENTER, 1);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(64, 64, 64);
  myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
  myGLCD.print("pmdway.com", LEFT, 114);


  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.drawRect(0, 13, 159, 113);

// Draw crosshairs
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.drawLine(79, 14, 79, 113);
  myGLCD.drawLine(1, 63, 158, 63);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);
 
  for (int i=9; i<150; i+=10)
    myGLCD.drawLine(i, 61, i, 65);
  for (int i=19; i<110; i+=10)
    myGLCD.drawLine(77, i, 81, i);
    

// Draw sin-, cos- and tan-lines  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,255,255);
  myGLCD.print("Sin", 5, 15);
  for (int i=1; i<158; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.drawPixel(i,63+(sin(((i*2.27)*3.14)/180)*40));
  }
  
  myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
  myGLCD.print("Cos", 5, 27);
  for (int i=1; i<158; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.drawPixel(i,63+(cos(((i*2.27)*3.14)/180)*40));
  }

  myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
  myGLCD.print("Tan", 5, 39);
  for (int i=1; i<158; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.drawPixel(i,63+(tan(((i*2.27)*3.14)/180)));
  }

  delay(2000);

  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.drawLine(79, 14, 79, 113);
  myGLCD.drawLine(1, 63, 158, 63);

 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  

// Draw a moving sinewave
  x=1;
  for (int i=1; i<(158*20); i++) 
  {
    x++;
    if (x==159)
      x=1;
    if (i>159)
    {
      if ((x==79)||(buf[x-1]==63))
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
      else
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
      myGLCD.drawPixel(x,buf[x-1]);
    }
    myGLCD.setColor(0,255,255);
    y=63+(sin(((i*2.5)*3.14)/180)*(40-(i / 100)));
    myGLCD.drawPixel(x,y);
    buf[x-1]=y;
  }

  delay(2000);
 
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  

// Draw some filled rectangles
  for (int i=1; i<6; i++)
  {
    switch (i)
    {
      case 1:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,255);
        break;
      case 2:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
        break;
      case 3:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,255,0);
        break;
      case 4:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
        break;
      case 5:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
        break;
    }
    myGLCD.fillRect(39+(i*10), 23+(i*10), 59+(i*10), 43+(i*10));
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);   

// Draw some filled, rounded rectangles
  for (int i=1; i<6; i++)
  {
    switch (i)
    {
      case 1:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,255);
        break;
      case 2:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
        break;
      case 3:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,255,0);
        break;
      case 4:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
        break;
      case 5:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
        break;
    }
    myGLCD.fillRoundRect(99-(i*10), 23+(i*10), 119-(i*10), 43+(i*10));
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);

 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  
// Draw some filled circles
  for (int i=1; i<6; i++)
  {
    switch (i)
    {
      case 1:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,255);
        break;
      case 2:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
        break;
      case 3:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,255,0);
        break;
      case 4:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
        break;
      case 5:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
        break;
    }
    myGLCD.fillCircle(49+(i*10),33+(i*10), 15);
  }

  delay(2000);
    
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    

// Draw some lines in a pattern
  myGLCD.setColor (255,0,0);
  for (int i=14; i<113; i+=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(1, i, (i*1.44)-10, 112);
  }
  myGLCD.setColor (255,0,0);
  for (int i=112; i>15; i-=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(158, i, (i*1.44)-12, 14);
  }
  myGLCD.setColor (0,255,255);
  for (int i=112; i>15; i-=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(1, i, 172-(i*1.44), 14);
  }
  myGLCD.setColor (0,255,255);
  for (int i=15; i<112; i+=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(158, i, 171-(i*1.44), 112);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    

// Draw some random circles
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=22+random(116);
    y=35+random(57);
    r=random(20);
    myGLCD.drawCircle(x, y, r);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    
  

// Draw some random rectangles
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=2+random(156);
    y=16+random(95);
    x2=2+random(156);
    y2=16+random(95);
    myGLCD.drawRect(x, y, x2, y2);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    

// Draw some random rounded rectangles
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=2+random(156);
    y=16+random(95);
    x2=2+random(156);
    y2=16+random(95);
    myGLCD.drawRoundRect(x, y, x2, y2);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  
 
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=2+random(156);
    y=16+random(95);
    x2=2+random(156);
    y2=16+random(95);
    myGLCD.drawLine(x, y, x2, y2);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  
 
  for (int i=0; i<5000; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    myGLCD.drawPixel(2+random(156), 16+random(95));
  }

  delay(2000);

  myGLCD.fillScr(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.fillRoundRect(10, 17, 149, 72);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 255, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.print("That's it!", CENTER, 20);
  myGLCD.print("Restarting in a", CENTER, 45);
  myGLCD.print("few seconds...", CENTER, 57);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 255, 0);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.print("Runtime: (msecs)", CENTER, 103);
  myGLCD.printNumI(millis(), CENTER, 115);

  delay (5000);   
}

 

Once you’re confident with the physical connection, upload the sketch. It should result with output as shown in the video below:

Now that you have succesfully run the demonstration sketch – where to from here?

The library used is based on the uTFT library by Henning Karlsen. You can find all the drawing and other commands in the user manual – so download the pdf and enjoy creating interesting displays.

This post brought to you by pmdway.com – everything for makers and electronics enthusiasts, with free delivery worldwide.

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LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino

Tutorial – LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino

In this tutorial we look at how to use the neat LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino from PMD Way. That’s a bit of a mouthful, however the shield does offer the following:

  • four digit, seven-segment LED display
  • DS1307 real-time clock IC
  • three buttons
  • four LEDs
  • a active buzzer
  • a light-dependent resistor (LDR)
  • and a thermistor for measuring ambient temperature

led-real-time-clock-temperature-sensor-shield-arduino-pmdway-1

The shield also arrives fully-assembled , so you can just plug it into your Arduino Uno or compatible board. Neat, beginners will love that. So let’s get started, by showing how each function can be used – then some example projects. In no particular order…

The buzzer

A high-pitched active buzzer is connected to digital pin D6 – which can be turned on and off with a simple digitalWrite() function. So let’s do that now, for example:

void setup() {
  // buzzer on digital pin 6
  pinMode(6, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
  digitalWrite(6, HIGH);   // turn the buzzer on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(1000);                       // wait for a second
  digitalWrite(6, LOW);    // turn the buzzer off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(1000);                       // wait for a second
}

If there is a white sticker over your buzzer, remove it before uploading the sketch. Now for a quick video demonstration. Turn down your volume before playback.

The LEDs

Our shield has four LEDs, as shown below:

led-real-time-clock-temperature-sensor-shield-arduino-pmdway-LEDs

They’re labelled D1 through to D4, with D1 on the right-hand side. They are wired to digital outputs D2, D3, D4 and D5 respectively. Again, they can be used with digitalWrite() – so let’s do that now with a quick demonstration of some blinky goodness. Our sketch turns the LEDs on and off in sequential order. You can change the delay by altering the variable x:

void setup() {
  // initialize digital pin LED_BUILTIN as an output.
  pinMode(2, OUTPUT); // LED 1
  pinMode(3, OUTPUT); // LED 2
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT); // LED 3
  pinMode(5, OUTPUT); // LED 4
}

int x = 200;

void loop() {
  digitalWrite(2, HIGH);    // turn on LED1
  delay(x);
  digitalWrite(2, LOW);    // turn off LED1. Process repeats for the other three LEDs
  digitalWrite(3, HIGH);
  delay(x);
  digitalWrite(3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(4, HIGH);
  delay(x);
  digitalWrite(4, LOW);
  digitalWrite(5, HIGH);
  delay(x);
  digitalWrite(5, LOW);
}

And in action:

The Buttons

It is now time to pay attention to the three large buttons on the bottom-left of the shield. They look imposing however are just normal buttons, and from right-to-left are connected to digital pins D9, D10 and D11:

LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino from PMD Way

They are, however, wired without external pull-up or pull-down resistors so when initialising them in your Arduino sketch you need to activate the digital input’s internal pull-up resistor inside the microcontroller using:

pinMode(pin, INPUT_PULLUP);

Due to this, buttons are by default HIGH when not pressed. So when you press a button, they return LOW. The following sketch demonstrates the use of the buttons by lighting LEDs when pressed:

void setup() {
  // initalise digital pins for LEDs as outputs
  pinMode(2, OUTPUT); // LED 1
  pinMode(3, OUTPUT); // LED 2
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT); // LED 3

  // initalise digital pins for buttons as inputs
  // and initialise internal pullups
  pinMode(9, INPUT_PULLUP); // button K1
  pinMode(10, INPUT_PULLUP); // button K2
  pinMode(11, INPUT_PULLUP); // button K3
}

void loop()
{
  if (digitalRead(9) == LOW)
  {
    digitalWrite(2, HIGH);
    delay(10);
    digitalWrite(2, LOW);
  }

  if (digitalRead(10) == LOW)
  {
    digitalWrite(3, HIGH);
    delay(10);
    digitalWrite(3, LOW);
  }

  if (digitalRead(11) == LOW)
  {
    digitalWrite(4, HIGH);
    delay(10);
    digitalWrite(4, LOW);
  }
}

You can see these in action via the following video:

The Numerical LED Display

Our shield has a nice red four-digit, seven-segment LED clock display. We call it a clock display as there are colon LEDs between the second and third digit, just as a digital clock would usually have:

LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino from PMD Way with free delivery worldwide

The display is controlled by a special IC, the Titan Micro TM1636:

TM1636 Numerical LED Display Driver IC from PMD Way with free delivery worldwide

The TM1636 itself is an interesting part, so we’ll explain that in a separate tutorial in the near future. For now, back to the shield.

To control the LED display we need to install an Arduino library. In fact the shield needs four, so you can install them all at once now. Download the .zip file from here. Then expand that into your local download directory – it contains four library folders. You can then install them one at a time using the Arduino IDE’s Sketch > Include library > Add .zip library… command:

LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino from PMD Way with free delivery worldwide

The supplied library offers five functions used to control the display.

.num(x);

…this displays a positive integer (whole number) between 0 and 9999.

.display(p,d);

… this shows a digit d in location p (locations from left to right are 3, 2, 1, 0)

.time(h,m)

… this is used to display time data (hours, minutes) easily. h is hours, m is minutes

.pointOn();
.pointOff();

… these turn the colon on … and off. And finally:

.clear();

… which clears the display to all off. At the start of the sketch, we need to use the library and initiate the instance of the display by inserting the following lines:

#include <TTSDisplay.h>
TTSDisplay rtcshield;

Don’t panic – the following sketch demonstrates the five functions described above:

#include <TTSDisplay.h>
TTSDisplay rtcshield;

int a = 0;
int b = 0;

void setup() {}

void loop()
{
  // display some numbers
  for (a = 4921; a < 5101; a++)
  {
    rtcshield.num(a);
    delay(10);
  }

  // clear display
  rtcshield.clear();

  // display individual digits
  for (a = 3; a >= 0; --a)
  {
    rtcshield.display(a, a);
    delay(1000);
    rtcshield.clear();
  }
  for (a = 3; a >= 0; --a)
  {
    rtcshield.display(a, a);
    delay(1000);
    rtcshield.clear();
  }

  // turn the colon and off
  for (a = 0; a < 5; a++)
  {
    rtcshield.pointOn();
    delay(500);
    rtcshield.pointOff();
    delay(500);
  }

  // demo the time display function
  rtcshield.pointOn();
  rtcshield.time(11, 57);
  delay(1000);
  rtcshield.time(11, 58);
  delay(1000);
  rtcshield.time(11, 59);
  delay(1000);
  rtcshield.time(12, 00);
  delay(1000);
}

And you can see it in action through the video below:

The LDR (Light Dependent Resistor)

LDRs are useful for giving basic light level measurements, and our shield has one connected to analog input pin A1. It’s the two-legged item with the squiggle on top as shown below:

led-real-time-clock-temperature-sensor-shield-arduino-pmdway-LDR

The resistance of LDRs change with light levels – the greater the light, the less the resistance. Thus by measuring the voltage of a current through the LDR with an analog input pin – you can get a numerical value proportional to the ambient light level. And that’s just what the following sketch does:

#include <TTSDisplay.h>
TTSDisplay rtcshield;

int a = 0;

void setup() {}
void loop()
{
  // read value of analog input
  a = analogRead(A1);
  // show value on display
  rtcshield.num(a);
  delay(100);
}

The Thermistor

A thermistor is a resistor whose resistance is relative to the ambient temperature. As the temperature increases, their resistance decreases. It’s the black part to the left of the LDR in the image below:

led-real-time-clock-temperature-sensor-shield-arduino-pmdway-LDR

We can use this relationship between temperature and resistance to determine the ambient temperature. To keep things simple we won’t go into the theory – instead, just show you how to get a reading.

The thermistor circuit on our shield has the output connected to analog input zero, and we can use the library installed earlier to take care of the mathematics. Which just leaves us with the functions.

At the start of the sketch, we need to use the library and initiate the instance of the thermistor by inserting the following lines:

#include <TTSTemp.h>
TTSTemp temp;

… then use the following which returns a positive integer containing the temperature (so no freezing cold environments):

.get();

For our example, we’ll get the temperature and show it on the numerical display:

#include <TTSDisplay.h>
#include <TTSTemp.h>

TTSTemp temp;
TTSDisplay rtcshield;

int a = 0;

void setup() {}

void loop() {

  a = temp.get();
  rtcshield.num(a);
  delay(500);
}

And our thermometer in action. No video this time… a nice 24 degrees C in the office:

led-real-time-clock-temperature-sensor-shield-arduino-pmdway-thermometer

The Real-Time Clock 

Our shield is fitted with a DS1307 real-time clock IC circuit and backup battery holder. If you insert a CR1220 battery, the RTC will remember the settings even if you remove the shield from the Arduino or if there’s a power blackout, board reset etc:

LED Real Time Clock Temperature Sensor Shield for Arduino from PMD Way with free delivery worldwide

The DS1307 is incredibly popular and used in many projects and found on many inexpensive breakout boards. We have a separate tutorial on how to use the DS1307, so instead of repeating ourselves – please visit our specific DS1307 Arduino tutorial, then return when finished.

Where to from here? 

We can image there are many practical uses for this shield, which will not only improve your Arduino coding skills but also have some useful applications. An example is given below, that you can use for learning or fun.

Temperature Alarm

This projects turns the shield into a temperature monitor – you can select a lower and upper temperature, and if the temperature goes outside that range the buzzer can sound until you press it.

Here’s the sketch:

#include <TTSDisplay.h>
#include <TTSTemp.h>

TTSTemp temp;
TTSDisplay rtcshield;

boolean alarmOnOff = false;
int highTemp = 40;
int lowTemp = 10;
int currentTemp;

void LEDsoff()
{
  // function to turn all alarm high/low LEDs off
  digitalWrite(2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(4, LOW);
}

void setup() {
  // initalise digital pins for LEDs and buzzer as outputs
  pinMode(2, OUTPUT); // LED 1
  pinMode(3, OUTPUT); // LED 2
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT); // LED 3
  pinMode(5, OUTPUT); // LED 4
  pinMode(6, OUTPUT); // buzzer

  // initalise digital pins for buttons as inputs
  // and initialise internal pullups
  pinMode(9, INPUT_PULLUP); // button K1
  pinMode(10, INPUT_PULLUP); // button K2
  pinMode(11, INPUT_PULLUP); // button K3
}

void loop()
{
  // get current temperature
  currentTemp = temp.get();

  // if current temperature is within set limts
  // show temperature on display

  if (currentTemp >= lowTemp || currentTemp <= highTemp)
    // if ambient temperature is less than high boundary
    // OR if ambient temperature is grater than low boundary
    // all is well
  {
    LEDsoff(); // turn off LEDs
    rtcshield.num(currentTemp);
  }

  // if current temperature is above set high bounday, show red LED and
  // show temperature on display
  // turn on buzzer if alarm is set to on (button K3)

  if (currentTemp > highTemp)
  {
    LEDsoff(); // turn off LEDs
    digitalWrite(4, HIGH); // turn on red LED
    rtcshield.num(currentTemp);
    if (alarmOnOff == true) {
      digitalWrite(6, HIGH); // buzzer on }
    }
  }

  // if current temperature is below set lower boundary, show blue LED and
  // show temperature on display
  // turn on buzzer if alarm is set to on (button K3)

  if (currentTemp < lowTemp)
  {
    LEDsoff(); // turn off LEDs
    digitalWrite(2, HIGH); // turn on blue LED
    rtcshield.num(currentTemp);
    if (alarmOnOff == true)
    {
      digitalWrite(6, HIGH); // buzzer on }
    }
  }
  // --------turn alarm on or off-----------------------------------------------------
  if (digitalRead(11) == LOW) // turn alarm on or off
  {
    alarmOnOff = !alarmOnOff;
    if (alarmOnOff == 0) {
      digitalWrite(6, LOW); // turn off buzzer
      digitalWrite(5, LOW); // turn off alarm on LED
    }
    // if alarm is set to on, turn LED on to indicate this
    if (alarmOnOff == 1)
    {
      digitalWrite(5, HIGH);
    }
    delay(300); // software debounce
  }
  // --------set low temperature------------------------------------------------------
  if (digitalRead(10) == LOW) // set low temperature. If temp falls below this value, activate alarm
  {
    // clear display and turn on blue LED to indicate user is setting lower boundary
    rtcshield.clear();
    digitalWrite(2, HIGH); // turn on blue LED
    rtcshield.num(lowTemp);

    // user can press buttons K2 and K1 to decrease/increase lower boundary.
    // once user presses button K3, lower boundary is locked in and unit goes
    // back to normal state

    while (digitalRead(11) != LOW)
      // repeat the following code until the user presses button K3
    {
      if (digitalRead(10) == LOW) // if button K2 pressed
      {
        --lowTemp; // subtract one from lower boundary
        // display new value. If this falls below zero, won't display. You can add checks for this yourself :)
        rtcshield.num(lowTemp);
      }
      if (digitalRead(9) == LOW) // if button K3 pressed
      {
        lowTemp++; // add one to lower boundary
        // display new value. If this exceeds 9999, won't display. You can add checks for this yourself :)
        rtcshield.num(lowTemp);
      }
      delay(300); // for switch debounce
    }
    digitalWrite(2, LOW); // turn off blue LED
  }
  // --------set high temperature-----------------------------------------------------
  if (digitalRead(9) == LOW) // set high temperature. If temp exceeds this value, activate alarm
  {

    // clear display and turn on red LED to indicate user is setting lower boundary
    rtcshield.clear();
    digitalWrite(4, HIGH); // turn on red LED
    rtcshield.num(highTemp);

    // user can press buttons K2 and K1 to decrease/increase upper boundary.
    // once user presses button K3, upper boundary is locked in and unit goes
    // back to normal state

    while (digitalRead(11) != LOW)
      // repeat the following code until the user presses button K3
    {
      if (digitalRead(10) == LOW) // if button K2 pressed
      {
        --highTemp; // subtract one from upper boundary
        // display new value. If this falls below zero, won't display. You can add checks for this yourself :)
        rtcshield.num(highTemp);
      }
      if (digitalRead(9) == LOW) // if button K3 pressed
      {
        highTemp++; // add one to upper boundary
        // display new value. If this exceeds 9999, won't display. You can add checks for this yourself :)
        rtcshield.num(highTemp);
      }
      delay(300); // for switch debounce
    }
    digitalWrite(4, LOW); // turn off red LED
  }
}

Operating instructions:

  • To set lower temperature, – press button K2. Blue LED turns on. Use buttons K2 and K1 to select temperature, then press K3 to lock it in. Blue LED turns off.
  • To set upper temperature – press button K1. Red LED turns on. Use buttons K2 and K1 to select temperature, then press K3 to lock it in. Red LED turns off.
  • If temperature drops below lower or exceeds upper temperature, the blue or red LED will come on.
  • You can have the buzzer sound when the alarm activates – to do this, press K3. When the buzzer mode is on, LED D4 will be on. You can turn buzzer off after it activates by pressing K3.
  • Display will show ambient temperature during normal operation.

You can see this in action via the video below:

Conclusion

This is a fun and useful shield – especially for beginners. It offers a lot of fun and options without any difficult coding or soldering – it’s easy to find success with the shield and increase your motivation to learn more and make more.

You can be serious with a clock, or annoy people with the buzzer. And at the time of writing you can have one for US$14.95, delivered. So go forth and create something.

A little research has shown that this shield was based from a product by Seeed, who discontinued it from sale. I’d like to thank them for the library.

This post brought to you by pmdway.com – everything for makers and electronics enthusiasts, with free delivery worldwide.

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